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    Are Sleep Apnea and Snoring the causes of your Weight Gain and Fatigue? Dr. Theodore Friedman hosts Jay Khorsandi, DDS from Snore Experts for a fascinating webinar on the relationship between Sleep Apnea, Snoring, Weight Gain and Daytime Fatigue. Topics to be discussed include: • Why does poor sleep lead to weight gain and fatigue? • Why are home sleep monitors better than in lab monitors? • What are the treatments for Sleep Apnea and Snoring? • Will the treatments lead to weight loss and more energy? • Dr. Friedman will also add some comments about the endocrine effects of poor sleep. Sunday • June 24th • 6 PM PST Click to start webinar at https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconcierg…/j.php… OR Join by phone: (855) 797-9485 Meeting Number (Access Code): 287 844 283 Your phone/computer will be muted on entry. There will be plenty of time for questions using the chat button. Meeting Password: dreams For more information, email Dr. Friedman at mail@goodhormonehealth.com
  4. Yesterday
  5. Comment added to Guest Question:  Is Itching Common with Cushing’s Syndrome?

    Were your itching, flushing and elevated BP episodes (cyclic) or there all of the time?

    In the comments area of https://cushieblogger.com/2018/05/30/guest-question-is-itching-common-with-cushings-syndrome/

  6. What Do You Think?

    A “friend” pushed me and I hit my head on a radiator and broke it and a few months after a tumor grew. I’ve been having symptoms ever since. Could I go after here and get compensation for medical care I need now?

    in the comments area of http://cushieblog.com/2016/12/21/pituitary-dysfunction-as-a-result-of-traumatic-brain-injury

  7. USC's 7 Tesla MRI scanner first to identify Cushing's disease in US patient

    A noninvasive 7 Tesla MRI scanner at University of Southern California is the first 7T scanner to be used on a patient with Cushing's disease in the U.S., according to a USC news release.  

    When a brain tumor was found to be "MRI-negative" in a 28-year-old female patient, physicians at the USC's Pituitary Center were unsatisfied with the results. After deciding to use the Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute's (INI) new ultrahigh field 7 Tesla MRI scanner to localize the tumor, the patient was officially diagnosed with Cushing's disease and researchers were finally able to be see the tumor that would've otherwise appeared hidden in a standard MRI.  

    Read more at https://www.healthimaging.com/topics/neuroimaging/uscs-7-tesla-mri-scanner-first-identify-cushings-disease-us-patient

  8. Last week
  9. Cushing’s disease patients who exhibit nodules or masses in their lungs should be thoroughly investigated to exclude fungal infection with Cryptococcus neoformans, a study from China suggests.

    While rare, the infection can be life-threatening, showing a particularly worse prognosis in patients with fluid infiltration in their lungs or with low white blood cell counts in their blood.

    Read more at https://cushieblog.com/2018/06/16/cushings-patients-at-risk-of-life-threatening-pulmonary-fungal-infection/

  10. To all my Cushie friends who are still dealing with this horrible disease, keep fighting, don’t ever give up, you will get better.  I told a very close friend of mine the other day, if I had the power I would heal everyone you today.  Cushing’s is a horrible disease, and unless you have been through it there is no way anyone could ever understand it. 

    Read more at https://cushieblogger.com/2017/11/14/letter-to-cushies/

  11. Ectopic ACTH-producing thymic carcinoid tumors are rare, but often behave aggressively with local invasion and distant metastasis. We herein report a case of ACTH-producing thymic typical carcinoid tumor with lymph node metastasis treated by surgery and postoperative radiation therapy.

    Read more at https://cushieblog.com/2018/06/13/cushings-syndrome-caused-by-acth-producing-thymic-typical-carcinoid-with-local-invasion-and-regional-lymph-node-metastasis-a-case-report/

  12. MaryO

    In Memory: Diana Crosley

    Diana Lynn Alexander Crosley, age 58, of Sidney, passed away peacefully on Wednesday, June 18, 2014, at 10:10 p.m. at her residence surrounded by her loving family. Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2015/06/18/in-memory-diana-crosley-2/
  13. MaryO

    In Memory ~ Sarah Fraik

    Sarah had recently had surgery to remove a tumor from her pituitary gland in the hopes of treating her Cushing’s Disease. She died on June 13, 2011 after a brief illness at the age of 28. Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2013/09/14/sarah-fraik/
  14. In Memory ~ Sarah Fraik

    Sarah had recently had surgery to remove a tumor from her pituitary gland in the hopes of treating her Cushing’s Disease.  She died on June 13, 2011 after a brief illness at the age of 28.

    Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2013/09/14/sarah-fraik/

  15. Earlier
  16. Radiation to the Whole Pituitary Compartment Effective at Controlling Cushing’s

    Radiation therapy targeting the entire sella — the compartment where the pituitary gland resides at the base of the brain — is effective at controlling Cushing’s disease and should be considered for patients with suspected invasive adenoma tumors, a new study shows.

    Read more at https://cushieblog.com/2018/06/02/radiation-to-the-whole-pituitary-compartment-effective-at-controlling-cushings/

  17. Thanks, Gig! I also got this answer from another Cushie:
  18. Yes!!! I itched a lot, had red face all the time. Also experienced a lot of nausea, Emetrol helped.
  19. Sharon, I'm not sure of the answer to this question, but I have occasional itching. Mine started in perimenopause and it was helped by first taking estrogen pills, then weaning off them and onto soy shakes. When I became menopausal, the itching seemed to have stopped but it's returned in recent years. Only occasionally, but about every month I get intense random itching. Benadryl helps. Because of the seemingly cyclical pattern to the itching, I asked my endo about it and he said I should get my liver tested. (I didn't. I just put up with the itching when it happens). So I don't know the answer to this question but know that you're not alone! Best of luck to you.
  20. Is itching common with Cushing’s Syndrome? Is it common to feel somewhat good for a day and then have itching, high blood pressure, nausea, flushed red face?
  21. MaryO

    Vision issues Post surgery!

    Steve, I might be in the same boat. My vision seems to come and go but I figured it was just me getting older. I'm post-op nearly 30 years.
  22. Guest

    Vision issues Post surgery!

    I have been a recovering Cushings patient for 20 years, I still get all of the vision issues that I had before surgery, it comes and goes, normally last a month or 2 then goes away for a while. Is anyone else having the same issues? Thanks Steve
  23. Guest

    Developing Cushings?

    Hello! I have been on hydrocortisone for almost two years from LOW-functioning adrenal glands. At first, the medication helped me (my blood pressure was so low, I was dizzy, sickly, couldn't bathe, needed help to the restroom, couldn't eat, heart racing, trouble breathing, and more). It helped me get out of bed again....temporarily. It helped a little with the shortness of breath. It helped me with my racing heart and blood pressure. I was on it about 8 months and then I started developing my symptoms all over again. I'm pretty much bedridden. I know I need to get off the steroids because docs have been saying that pretty much ever since I was put on it. They were so worried about me being on it and now I can understand why. I feel WORSE. Do you know if Cushings can come from taking steroid medication long term? I am developing a buffalo hump and I am feeling so ill every day. I want to wean from the meds, as I feel they are making me worse, but any weaning has resulted in worsened symptoms (that have already worsened). I am 26 year old female. I was a half-marathon runner/athlete at age 22, then a year later after my cousin's death, my health rapidly declined. Stress got to me and I became sicker and sicker, leading to weakened adrenals and the need for hydrocortisone. I just want to FEEL 26. I don't think I HAVE cushing's because my blood pressure is still low or low normal when checking. I have definitely gained weight (70 pounds since the steroids) and have a round face. Any thoughts? Thank you very much.
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    Thursday May 31, 2018 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM EDT Presented by Yuval Eisenberg, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine University of Illinois, at Chicago (UIC) Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism Webinar Description Learning Objectives: 1) Review the functions of oxytocin in humans 2) Describe areas of active research on oxytocin effects 3) Review the relevant oxytocin and hypopituitarism literature Presenter Bio Dr. Yuval Eisenberg is an endocrinologist at the University of Illinois, at Chicago (UIC). Dr. Eisenberg studied Medicine at Rush Medical College in Chicago and then did his internship, residency and fellowship at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is certified in Internal Medicine and Endocrinology. Dr. Yuval Eisenberg strives to connect with his patients and provide top quality medical care. He believes strongly that a good patient/doctor relationship is the backbone for successful medical practice. His goal with each visit is to listen, inquire, and educate and to assist you with making important medical decisions. Although his main focus is General Endocrinology, Dr. Eisenberg has a specialized interest in pituitary and adrenal disorders. Dr. Eisenberg's research interest in in the hormone oxytocin and how it might affect patients with pituitary hormone deficiencies (hypopituitarism). Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8391851366080015362?utm_source=newsletter_271&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=webinar-announcement-webinar-oxytocin-and-hypopituitarism-a-missing-forgotten-hormone
  25. Thursday May 31, 2018 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM EDT Presented by Yuval Eisenberg, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine University of Illinois, at Chicago (UIC) Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism Webinar Description Learning Objectives: 1) Review the functions of oxytocin in humans 2) Describe areas of active research on oxytocin effects 3) Review the relevant oxytocin and hypopituitarism literature Presenter Bio Dr. Yuval Eisenberg is an endocrinologist at the University of Illinois, at Chicago (UIC). Dr. Eisenberg studied Medicine at Rush Medical College in Chicago and then did his internship, residency and fellowship at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is certified in Internal Medicine and Endocrinology. Dr. Yuval Eisenberg strives to connect with his patients and provide top quality medical care. He believes strongly that a good patient/doctor relationship is the backbone for successful medical practice. His goal with each visit is to listen, inquire, and educate and to assist you with making important medical decisions. Although his main focus is General Endocrinology, Dr. Eisenberg has a specialized interest in pituitary and adrenal disorders. Dr. Eisenberg's research interest in the hormone oxytocin and how it might affect patients with pituitary hormone deficiencies (hypopituitarism). Register at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8391851366080015362?utm_source=newsletter_271&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=webinar-announcement-webinar-oxytocin-and-hypopituitarism-a-missing-forgotten-hormone
  26. When classifying patients by tumor size, however, researchers found that patients with macroadenomas — tumors larger than 10 mm — had higher rates of remission and lower recurrence rates after endoscopic surgery. Patients with microadenomas (tumors smaller than 10 mm) had comparable outcomes with either technique.

    Read more at https://cushieblog.com/2018/05/26/endoscopic-surgery-should-be-standard-for-cushings-patients-with-large-tumors/

  27. Etomidate Found Effective in Severe Cushing’s Syndrome

    In April 2017, the patient arrived at the emergency room with sepsis — a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection — that originated in the gut.

    Because ketoconazole had failed to lower cortisol levels, the patient started receiving infused etomidate, an inhibitor of the enzyme 11‐beta‐hydroxylase that prevents cortisol synthesis.

    This treatment was stopped one day before the bilateral removal of the adrenal glands as a definitive treatment for the elevated production of cortisol.

    Read more at https://cushieblog.com/2018/05/18/etomidate-found-effective-in-severe-cushings-syndrome/

  28. Register now for the 10th Annual Johns Hopkins Pituitary Patient Day

    Saturday, October 13, 2018, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

    More info at https://cushieblogger.com/2018/05/18/tenth-annual-johns-hopkins-pituitary-patient-day/

     

     

     

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    Join us on Saturday, October 13, 2018 10th Annual Johns Hopkins Pituitary Patient Day Saturday, October 13, 2018, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Location: Johns Hopkins Mt. Washington Conference Center 5801 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 map and directions Attendance and parking are free, but seating is limited. Reserve your space now: Please R.S.V.P. by email (preferred) to PituitaryDay@jhmi.edu or by calling 410-670-7259. Agenda 9:00 - 9:25 a.m.: Registration 9:25 - 9:30 a.m.: Welcome and acknowledgments (Roberto Salvatori, M.D.) 9:30 - 10:00 a.m.: Symptoms of Pituitary Tumors: Acromegaly, Cushing, and Non-Functioning Masses (Roberto Salvatori, M.D.) 10:00 - 10:30 a.m.: Effects of Pituitary Tumors on Vision (Amanda Henderson, M.D.) 10:30 - 11:00 a.m.: A Patient's Story (to be announced) 11:00 - 11:30 a.m.: The Nose: the Door to Access the Pituitary Gland (Murray Ramanathan, M.D.) 11:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.: Surgery for Pituitary Tumors: Images from the Operating Room (Gary Gallia, M.D., Ph.D.) 12:00 - 12:30 p.m.: Radiation Therapy for Cushing, Acromegaly and Non-Functioning Tumors: When Needed, A Good Option (Kristin Redmond, M.D.) 12:30 - 1:25 p.m.: Lunch 1:30 - 3:00 p.m. Round Table Discussions: Acromegaly Cushing Disease Non-Functioning Adenomas Craniopharyngiomas and Rathke's Cysts
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