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  4. Update on the Treatment of Pituitary Diseases:
    Emerging Therapies

    This course is suited for medical professionals, patients, and caregivers to improve patient care and outcomes through evidence-based discussion of clinical practice guidelines and emerging therapies in order to assess and update current practices to promote earlier diagnosis and treatment of pituitary diseases. 

    https://cushieblogger.com/2019/01/16/update-on-the-treatment-of-pituitary-diseases-emerging-therapies/

  5. until
    Friday April 12, 2019 8:30am – 4:30pm Zuckerman Research Center 417 E. 68th St. New York, NY Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center This course is suited for medical professionals, patients, and caregivers to improve patient care and outcomes through evidence-based discussion of clinical practice guidelines and emerging therapies in order to assess and update current practices to promote earlier diagnosis and treatment of pituitary diseases. The multidisciplinary nature of the course will allow the dissemination of knowledge across the variety of practitioners caring for pituitary patients, as well as for patients and caregivers. After completion of this educational activity, participants will be up-to-date on the latest in ongoing care and clinical management of patients with pituitary conditions. The patient breakout sessions will provide pituitary patients the ability to review treatment options, learn about ongoing clinical trials, and discuss their comprehensive care with providers and other patients. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center is providing this course to pituitary patients and caregivers free of charge. To register to attend, please email cme@mskcc.org . (Please note: Registration is required in order to attend.) Medical Professionals who wish to attend must register online: mskcc.org/PituitaryCourse . View Course Flyer
  6. Last week
  7. New Cushie added to the Cushing's MemberMap.

     Holly W is from Harper, TX  She is not yet diagnosed with Cushing's.

    See the map at https://goo.gl/EKpyqr

  8. Another comment added to Stefanie, Pituitary Bio

    I was also diagnosed in 2012 and has surgery in 2013. I continue on meds and have many health issues still. I haven’t had a full recovery and dramatic weight loss or anything. I’m now starting to regret surgery as it has left me very limited in what I can do. I was far more mobile before. I miss my life. I’ve lost everything since having surgery!..

    Read more in the comments area of  https://cushingsbios.com/2019/01/11/stefanie-pituitary-bio/

  9. Comment added to Stefanie, Pituitary Bio

    I, too, was diagnosed with a pituitary tumor and subsequently had surgery to remove it. I still struggle day to day with many issues…word finding, comprehension, emotions. I also struggle with finding Cushings disease support groups in our area.

    In the comments at https://cushingsbios.com/2019/01/11/stefanie-pituitary-bio/

  10. A simple test that measures free cortisol levels in saliva at midnight — called a midnight salivary cortisol test — showed good diagnostic performance for Cushing’s syndrome among a Chinese population, according to a recent study. The test was better than the standard urine free cortisol levels and may be an alternative for people with end-stage kidney disease, in whom measuring cortisol in urine is challenging. The study, “Midnight salivary cortisol for the diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome in a Chinese population,” was published in Singapore Medical Journal. Cushing’s syndrome, defined by excess cortisol levels, is normally diagnosed by measuring the amount of cortisol in bodily fluids. Traditionally, urine free cortisol has been the test of choice, but this method is subject to complications ranging from improper collection to metabolic differences, and its use is limited in people with poor kidney function. Midnight salivary cortisol is a test that takes into account the normal fluctuation of cortisol levels in bodily fluids. Cortisol peaks in the morning and declines throughout the day, reaching its lowest levels at midnight. In Cushing’s patients, however, this variation ceases to exist and cortisol remains elevated throughout the day. Midnight salivary cortisol was first proposed in the 1980s as a noninvasive way to measure cortisol levels, but its efficacy and cutoff value for Cushing’s disease in the Chinese population remained unclear. Researchers examined midnight salivary cortisol, urine free cortisol, and midnight serum cortisol in Chinese patients suspected of having Cushing’s syndrome and in healthy volunteers. These measurements were then combined with imaging studies to make a diagnosis. Overall, the study included 29 patients with Cushing’s disease, and 19 patients with Cushing’s syndrome — 15 caused by an adrenal mass and four caused by an ACTH-producing tumor outside the pituitary. Also, 13 patients excluded from the suspected Cushing’s group were used as controls and 21 healthy volunteers were considered the “normal” group. The team found that the mean midnight salivary cortisol was significantly higher in the Cushing’s group compared to both control and normal subjects. Urine free cortisol and midnight serum cortisol were also significantly higher than those found in the control group, but not the normal group. The optimal cutoff value of midnight salivary cortisol for diagnosing Cushing’s was 1.7 ng/mL, which had a sensitivity of 98% — only 2% are false negatives — and a specificity of 100% — no false positives. While midnight salivary cortisol levels correlated with urine free cortisol and midnight serum cortisol — suggesting that all of them can be useful diagnostic markers for Cushing’s — the accuracy of midnight salivary cortisol was better than the other two measures. Notably, in one patient with a benign adrenal mass and impaired kidney function, urine free cortisol failed to reach the necessary threshold for a Cushing’s diagnosis, but midnight salivary and serum cortisol levels both confirmed the diagnosis, highlighting how midnight salivary cortisol could be a preferable diagnostic method over urine free cortisol. “MSC is a simple and non-invasive tool that does not require hospitalization. Our results confirmed the accuracy and reliability of [midnight salivary cortisol] as a diagnostic test for [Cushing’s syndrome] for the Chinese population,” the investigators said. The team also noted that its study is limited: the sample size was quite small, and Cushing’s patients tended to be older than controls, which may have skewed the results. Larger studies will be needed to validate these results in the future. From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2019/01/10/midnight-salivary-cortisol-test-helps-diagnose-cushings-chinese-study-shows/
  11. Stefanie, Pituitary Bio

    Stefanie is from Michigan  She  was diagnosed in 2012 and had pituitary surgery done 2013. She is currently on medications.

    Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2019/01/11/stefanie-pituitary-bio/

  12. until
    13th Annual Conference for Adults with Endocrine Disorders in Partnership with Barrow Neurological Institute Pituitary Center February 28th, 2019 - March 3rd, 2019 Phoenix, Arizona Schedule of Events Thursday 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm Welcome Reception, Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown Friday 9:00 am - 4:00 pm Exhibitors, Barrow Pituitary Center 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center 12:00 am - 1:00 pm Lunch (included) 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm Group outing to Scottsdale Waterfront Saturday 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center 12:00 am - 1:00 pm Lunch (included) 1:00 pm - 3:30 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center Sunday 9:00 am - 1:30 pm Educational Segments, Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown ********************************************************** Friday Educational Segments at Barrow Pituitary Center 10:00 am Managing Cushings: Navigating Through the Maze, Yuen or 10:00 am Managing AGHD: Daily and Beyond, Knecht 11:00 am Hypothalamic Obesity: Not Just Calories In, Calories Out, Connor 12:00 pm LUNCH (included) 1:00 pm Me, Myself and My Adrenal Insufficiency, Yuen 2:00 pm Navigating the Medical Maze, Herring Saturday Educational Segments at Barrow Pituitary Center 10:00 am Beyond AGHD and Cushings: Familial and Genetic Factors, Stratakis 11:00 am Q&A, Stratakis 12:00 pm LUNCH (included) 1:00 pm Tools for Coping with my Endocrine Disorder, Jonas 2:00 pm Finnigan and Friends: A Year in AI Training, Palmer 2:30 pm Quality of Life Study, Cushings, Edgar & Keil or 2:30 pm Life is What You Make Of It, Jones Sunday Educational Segments at Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown 9:00 am Preventing Muscle Wasting and Nutrition, Fine 10:00 am Nuances of Treating Hypothyroidism, Friedman 11:00 am Macrilen Stimulation Test for Growth Hormone Deficiency, Friedman 11:45 am The New and The Old for Diagnosing Cushing's Syndrome, Friedman 12:30 pm Ask the Wiz, Friedman Location Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center Goldman Auditorium and Sonntag Pavilion 350 W. Thomas Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85013 Transportation will be provided on Friday and Saturday between the Wyndham Hotel to Barrow for an hour prior to the segments and an hour after close of the segments. The hotel is approximately 1/2 mile away from Barrow Pituitary Center if you choose to walk or travel there on your own. Hotel Room Rates and Reservations Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown 3600 N. 2nd Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85013 $109 per night + tax. Includes free wifi, parking and buffet breakfast To make hotel reservations call 602-604-4900 and ask for The MAGIC Foundation guest room block. Refrigerators are first come so be sure to request one when making your reservation. Airport Transportation Transportation is not provided to/from the hotel from the airport. The Wyndham is approximately 9 miles from the airport. Preferred airport is Phoenix, AZ - PHX - Sky Harbor Intl. Deadline to Register and book your hotel is January 28, 2019 View the entire PDF Program
  13. MaryO

    Last Day to Register

    13th Annual Conference for Adults with Endocrine Disorders in Partnership with Barrow Neurological Institute Pituitary Center February 28th, 2019 - March 3rd, 2019 Phoenix, Arizona Schedule of Events Thursday 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm Welcome Reception, Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown Friday 9:00 am - 4:00 pm Exhibitors, Barrow Pituitary Center 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center 12:00 am - 1:00 pm Lunch (included) 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm Group outing to Scottsdale Waterfront Saturday 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center 12:00 am - 1:00 pm Lunch (included) 1:00 pm - 3:30 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center Sunday 9:00 am - 1:30 pm Educational Segments, Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown ********************************************************** Friday Educational Segments at Barrow Pituitary Center 10:00 am Managing Cushings: Navigating Through the Maze, Yuen or 10:00 am Managing AGHD: Daily and Beyond, Knecht 11:00 am Hypothalamic Obesity: Not Just Calories In, Calories Out, Connor 12:00 pm LUNCH (included) 1:00 pm Me, Myself and My Adrenal Insuffiency, Yuen 2:00 pm Navigating the Medical Maze, Herring Saturday Educational Segments at Barrow Pituitary Center 10:00 am Beyond AGHD and Cushings: Familial and Genetic Factors, Stratakis 11:00 am Q&A, Stratakis 12:00 pm LUNCH (included) 1:00 pm Tools for Coping with my Endocrine Disorder, Jonas 2:00 pm Finnigan and Friends: A Year in AI Training, Palmer 2:30 pm Quality of Life Study, Cushings, Edgar & Keil or 2:30 pm Life is What You Make Of It, Jones Sunday Educational Segments at Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown 9:00 am Preventing Muscle Wasting and Nutrition, Fine 10:00 am Nuances of Treating Hypothyroidism, Friedman 11:00 am Macrilen Stimulation Test for Growth Hormone Defiency, Friedman 11:45 am The New and The Old for Diagnosing Cushing's Syndrome, Friedman 12:30 pm Ask the Wiz, Friedman Location Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center Goldman Auditorium and Sonntag Pavilion 350 W. Thomas Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85013 Transportation will be provided on Friday and Saturday between the Wyndham Hotel to Barrow for an hour prior to the segments and an hour after close of the segments. The hotel is approximately 1/2 mile away from Barrow Pituitary Center if you choose to walk or travel there on your own. Hotel Room Rates and Reservations Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown 3600 N. 2nd Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85013 $109 per night + tax. Includes free wifi, parking and buffet breakfast To make hotel reservations call 602-604-4900 and ask for The MAGIC Foundation guest room block. Refrigerators are first come so be sure to request one when making your reservation. Airport Transportation Transportation is not provided to/from the hotel from the airport. The Wyndham is approximately 9 miles from the airport. Preferred airport is Phoenix, AZ - PHX - Sky Harbor Intl. Deadline to Register and book your hotel is January 28, 2019 View the entire PDF Program
  14. Earlier
  15. Nicola C (Nikkikicks), Undiagnosed Bio

    Nicola is from Denver, Colorado  She was in a car accident in 7/17 and had prednisone.  That is when her symptoms started.

    Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2019/01/09/nicola-c-nikkikicks-undiagnosed-bio/

  16. Comment added to Nicole, Undiagnosed Bio

    Your case is every similar to mine. I wasn’t a dancer but I did play multiple sports in high school and played college basketball. I saw doctor Yuen at Swedish as well and many more doctors as well. I have never got my case or my symptoms solved. Over 4 years of doctors and testing. They found I had a pituitary tumor and mildly high cortisol in my 24 hour Urine test with high levels of testostine...

    Read more in the comments at https://cushingsbios.com/2017/07/13/nicole-undiagnosed-bio/

  17. Comment added to Brian R, MENS Bio

    Thanks for sharing your story. In February it will be 6 years since I’ve had my pituitary surgery. My health is constantly up and down as well. I was just wondering if you’re treated for depression or anxiety at all? Also, have you found any exercises or physical therapy to be helpful? ...

    Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2018/12/15/brian-r-mens-bio/

  18. In Memory: Lori Holt

    During the first few days of September 2007, Lori had surgery to remove her adrenal gland.
    She experienced extreme difficulty post surgery and never recovered.

    Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2015/01/06/in-memory-lori-holt/

  19. In Memory: Jill's Father

    January 5, 2005

    Jill wrote: 'In December 2004 my dad who had addison's for over 30 years had a triple bypass surgery 6 days before Christmas. The surgery was an amazine success and it was predicted he would be home before Christmas. Day 2 following surgery the hospital neglected to give him his steriods for his Addison's for 22 hours, which they were completely aware that he had...'

    Read more at  https://cushingsbios.com/2016/04/29/in-memory-jills-father-january-5-2005/

  20. New Helpful Doctor added to New Jersey

    James K. Liu, MD
    Professor of Neurosurgery
    Director of Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery
    Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School
    RWJ Barnabas Health

    Read more at https://cushieblogger.com/2019/01/05/helpful-doctors-new-jersey/

     

  21. MaryO

    In Memory: Jill's Father

    January 5, 2005 Jill wrote: 'In December 2004 my dad who had addison's for over 30 years had a triple bypass surgery 6 days before Christmas. The surgery was an amazine success and it was predicted he would be home before Christmas. Day 2 following surgery the hospital neglected to give him his steriods for his Addison's for 22 hours, which they were completely aware that he had...' Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2016/04/29/in-memory-jills-father-january-5-2005/
  22. Webinar:Treatment Strategies for Prolactinomas

    Learning Objectives:

    • To understand the medical therapies for prolactinomas
    • To understand the roles of surgery for prolactinomas
    • To understand the roles of radiation for prolactinomas

    Read more at https://cushieblogger.com/2019/01/04/webinartreatment-strategies-for-prolactinomas/

  23. Presented by: James K. Liu, MD Professor of Neurosurgery Director of Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School RWJ Barnabas Health After registering you will receive a confirmation email with information about joining the webinar. Register here Date: January 9, 2019 Time: 3:00PM- 4:00 PM Pacific Standard Time, 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM Eastern Standard Time Learning Objectives: To understand the medical therapies for prolactinomas To understand the roles of surgery for prolactinomas To understand the roles of radiation for prolactinomas Presenter Bio: Dr. James K. Liu is the Director of Cerebrovascular, Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery at the Rutgers Neurological Institute of New Jersey, and Professor of Neurological Surgery at Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School. He is board certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery, and has a robust pituitary tumor practice at University Hospital and Saint Barnabas Medical Center. Dr. Liu graduated summa cum laude from UCLA with Phi Beta Kappa honors, and obtained his MD from New York Medical College with AOA honors. After completing a neurosurgery residency at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, he was awarded the Dandy Clinical Fellowship by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and obtained advanced fellowship training in Skull Base, Cerebrovascular Surgery & Neuro-oncology at the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. Dr. Liu is renowned for his comprehensive treatment of complex brain tumors and skull base lesions, including pituitary tumors, acoustic neuromas,meningiomas, craniopharyngiomas, chordomas, and jugular foramen tumors. His robust clinical practice encompasses both traditional open and minimally invasive endoscopic endonasal skull base approaches. He also specializes in microsurgery of cerebrovascular diseases including aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), cavernous malformations, and carotid artery stenosis. He also has expertise in cerebrovascular bypass procedures for moya moya disease, carotid artery occlusion, vertebral artery occlusion, complex aneurysms and skull base tumors, as well as endoscopic-assisted microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm. As one of the most active researchers in his field, Dr. Liu has published extensively with over 250 peer-reviewed publications and 25 textbook chapters. He has taught many hands-on cadaver dissection courses in skull base surgery and has lectured extensively nationally and internationally throughout North America, Latin America, Europe, and Asia. Dr. Liu's research is focused on the development of innovative and novel skull base and endoscopic techniques, quantitative surgical neuroanatomy, microsurgical and microvascular anastomosis skills training, virtual surgical simulation, pituitary tumor biology, and clinical outcomes after skull base and cerebrovascular surgery. Dr. Liu is an active member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, North American Skull Base Society, Pituitary Network Association, The Facial Pain (Trigeminal Neuralgia) Association, AANS/CNS Cerebrovascular Section, Tumor Section. He serves on the medical advisory board of the Acoustic Neuroma Association of New Jersey, and is the current Secretary-Treasurer of the International Meningioma Society.
  24. Presented by: James K. Liu, MD Professor of Neurosurgery Director of Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School RWJ Barnabas Health After registering you will receive a confirmation email with information about joining the webinar. Register here Date: January 9, 2019 Time: 3:00PM- 4:00 PM Pacific Standard Time, 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM Eastern Standard Time Learning Objectives: To understand the medical therapies for prolactinomas To understand the roles of surgery for prolactinomas To understand the roles of radiation for prolactinomas Presenter Bio: Dr. James K. Liu is the Director of Cerebrovascular, Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery at the Rutgers Neurological Institute of New Jersey, and Professor of Neurological Surgery at Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School. He is board certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery, and has a robust pituitary tumor practice at University Hospital and Saint Barnabas Medical Center. Dr. Liu graduated summa cum laude from UCLA with Phi Beta Kappa honors, and obtained his MD from New York Medical College with AOA honors. After completing a neurosurgery residency at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, he was awarded the Dandy Clinical Fellowship by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and obtained advanced fellowship training in Skull Base, Cerebrovascular Surgery & Neuro-oncology at the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. Dr. Liu is renowned for his comprehensive treatment of complex brain tumors and skull base lesions, including pituitary tumors, acoustic neuromas,meningiomas, craniopharyngiomas, chordomas, and jugular foramen tumors. His robust clinical practice encompasses both traditional open and minimally invasive endoscopic endonasal skull base approaches. He also specializes in microsurgery of cerebrovascular diseases including aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), cavernous malformations, and carotid artery stenosis. He also has expertise in cerebrovascular bypass procedures for moya moya disease, carotid artery occlusion, vertebral artery occlusion, complex aneurysms and skull base tumors, as well as endoscopic-assisted microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm. As one of the most active researchers in his field, Dr. Liu has published extensively with over 250 peer-reviewed publications and 25 textbook chapters. He has taught many hands-on cadaver dissection courses in skull base surgery and has lectured extensively nationally and internationally throughout North America, Latin America, Europe, and Asia. Dr. Liu's research is focused on the development of innovative and novel skull base and endoscopic techniques, quantitative surgical neuroanatomy, microsurgical and microvascular anastomosis skills training, virtual surgical simulation, pituitary tumor biology, and clinical outcomes after skull base and cerebrovascular surgery. Dr. Liu is an active member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, North American Skull Base Society, Pituitary Network Association, The Facial Pain (Trigeminal Neuralgia) Association, AANS/CNS Cerebrovascular Section, Tumor Section. He serves on the medical advisory board of the Acoustic Neuroma Association of New Jersey, and is the current Secretary-Treasurer of the International Meningioma Society.
  25. MaryO

    In Memory: Lori Holt

    During the first few days of September 2007, Lori had surgery to remove her adrenal gland. She experienced extreme difficulty post surgery and never recovered. Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2015/01/06/in-memory-lori-holt/
  26. A man with Cushing’s disease  - caused by an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma - who later developed metastases in the central nervous system without Cushing’s recurrence, was successfully treated over eight years.. https://goo.gl/gmP8rS

  27. A man with Cushing’s disease — caused by an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma — who later developed metastases in the central nervous system without Cushing’s recurrence, was successfully treated over eight years with radiation and chemotherapy, according to a case report. The report, “Long-term survival following transformation of an adrenocorticotropic hormone secreting pituitary macroadenoma to a silent corticotroph pituitary carcinoma: Case report,” was published in the journal World Neurosurgery. Pituitary carcinomas make up only 0.1-0.2% of all pituitary tumors and are characterized by a primary pituitary tumor that metastasizes into cranial, spinal, or systemic locations. Fewer than 200 cases have been reported in the literature. Most of these carcinomas secrete hormones, with ACTH being the most common. Though the majority of ACTH-secreting carcinomas present with Cushing’s disease, about one-third do not show symptoms of the condition and have normal serum cortisol and ACTH levels. These are called silent corticotroph adenomas and are considered more aggressive. A research team at the University of Alabama at Birmingham presented the case of a 51-year-old Caucasian man with ACTH-dependent Cushing’s disease. He had undergone an incomplete transsphenoidal (through the nose) resection of an ACTH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma – larger than 10 mm in size – and radiation therapy the year before. At referral in August 1997, the patient had persistent high cortisol levels and partial hypopituitarism, or pituitary insufficiency. He exhibited Cushing’s symptoms, including facial reddening, moon facies, weight gain above the collarbone, “buffalo hump,” and abdominal stretch marks. About two years later, the man was weaned off ketoconazole — a medication used to lower cortisol levels — and his cortisol levels had been effectively reduced. He also had no physical manifestations of Cushing’s apart from facial reddening. In May 2010, the patient reported two episodes of partial seizures, describing two spells of right arm tingling, followed by impaired peripheral vision. Imaging showed a 2.1-by-1-cm mass with an associated cyst within the brain’s right posterior temporal lobe, as well as a 1.8-by-1.2-cm mass at the cervicomedullary junction, which is the region where the brainstem continues as the spinal cord. His right temporal cystic mass was then removed by craniotomy. A histopathologic analysis was consistent with pituitary carcinoma. Cell morphology was generally similar to the primary pituitary tumor, but cell proliferation was higher. Physical exams showed no recurrence of Cushing’s disease and 24-hour free urinary cortisol was within the normal range. His cervicomedullary metastasis was treated with radiation therapy in July 2010. He took the oral chemotherapy temozolomide until August 2011, and Avastin (bevacizumab, by Genentech) was administered from September 2010 to November 2012. At present, the patient continues to undergo annual imaging and laboratory draws. He receives treatment with hydrocortisone, levothyroxine — synthetic thyroid hormone — and testosterone replacement with androgel. His most recent exam showed no progression over eight years of a small residual right temporal cyst, a residual mass along the pituitary stalk — the connection between the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland — and a small residual mass at the cervicomedullary junction. Lab results continue to show no Cushing’s recurrence. “Our case is the first to document a patient who initially presented with an endocrinologically active ACTH secreting pituitary adenoma and Cushing’s disease who later developed cranial and spinal metastases without recurrence of Cushing’s disease and transformation to a silent corticotroph pituitary carcinoma,” the scientists wrote. They added that the report is also the first documenting “8 years of progression-free survival in a patient with pituitary carcinoma treated with radiotherapy, [temozolomide] and bevacizumab.” Adapted from https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2019/01/03/successful-treatment-pituitary-carcinoma-radiation-chemo-case-report/
  28. Caryl, Undiagnosed Bio

    Caryl is from Philippines.  She is not yet diagnosed with Cushing's but her OB-GYN told her she has PCOS.  She has several other Cushing's symptoms.

    Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2018/12/31/caryl-undiagnosed-bio/

  29. Comment added to Rachel, Undiagnosed Bio

    Hi Rachel, I’m 27 and share very similar symptoms with you. I luckily have a great primary care doc who I can talk to about this during my next appt. I’d love to compare notes! Feel free to reach out.

    Read the original bio at https://cushingsbios.com/2017/04/03/rachel-undiagnosed-bio/

  30. A 42-year-old woman who presented to hospital with acute vision loss in her right eye was diagnosed with a benign tumour in her adrenal gland. Writing in BMJ Case Reports, clinicians described how the patient presented with a visual acuity of 6/36 in her right eye and 6/6 in her left eye. Investigations revealed an exudative retinal detachment in her right eye as well as a pigment epithelial detachment. The patient had multifocal central serous retinopathy in both eyes. The woman, who had hypertension and diabetes, was diagnosed with Cushing syndrome and a right adrenal adenoma was also discovered. During a treatment period that spanned several years, the patient received an adrenalectomy followed by a maintenance dose of steroids. The patient subsequently developed central serous retinopathy again which the clinicians believe might be related to steroid use. The authors advised “careful deliberation” in prescribing a maintenance dose of steroids following removal of the adrenal glands because of the potential link to retinopathy. From https://www.aop.org.uk/ot/science-and-vision/research/2018/12/17/vision-loss-the-first-sign-of-adrenal-tumour-in-42-year-old-patient
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