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  4. Etomidate Found Effective in Severe Cushing’s Syndrome

    In April 2017, the patient arrived at the emergency room with sepsis — a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection — that originated in the gut.

    Because ketoconazole had failed to lower cortisol levels, the patient started receiving infused etomidate, an inhibitor of the enzyme 11‐beta‐hydroxylase that prevents cortisol synthesis.

    This treatment was stopped one day before the bilateral removal of the adrenal glands as a definitive treatment for the elevated production of cortisol.

    Read more at https://cushieblog.com/2018/05/18/etomidate-found-effective-in-severe-cushings-syndrome/

  5. Register now for the 10th Annual Johns Hopkins Pituitary Patient Day

    Saturday, October 13, 2018, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

    More info at https://cushieblogger.com/2018/05/18/tenth-annual-johns-hopkins-pituitary-patient-day/

     

     

     

  6. until
    Join us on Saturday, October 13, 2018 10th Annual Johns Hopkins Pituitary Patient Day Saturday, October 13, 2018, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Location: Johns Hopkins Mt. Washington Conference Center 5801 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 map and directions Attendance and parking are free, but seating is limited. Reserve your space now: Please R.S.V.P. by email (preferred) to PituitaryDay@jhmi.edu or by calling 410-670-7259. Agenda 9:00 - 9:25 a.m.: Registration 9:25 - 9:30 a.m.: Welcome and acknowledgments (Roberto Salvatori, M.D.) 9:30 - 10:00 a.m.: Symptoms of Pituitary Tumors: Acromegaly, Cushing, and Non-Functioning Masses (Roberto Salvatori, M.D.) 10:00 - 10:30 a.m.: Effects of Pituitary Tumors on Vision (Amanda Henderson, M.D.) 10:30 - 11:00 a.m.: A Patient's Story (to be announced) 11:00 - 11:30 a.m.: The Nose: the Door to Access the Pituitary Gland (Murray Ramanathan, M.D.) 11:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.: Surgery for Pituitary Tumors: Images from the Operating Room (Gary Gallia, M.D., Ph.D.) 12:00 - 12:30 p.m.: Radiation Therapy for Cushing, Acromegaly and Non-Functioning Tumors: When Needed, A Good Option (Kristin Redmond, M.D.) 12:30 - 1:25 p.m.: Lunch 1:30 - 3:00 p.m. Round Table Discussions: Acromegaly Cushing Disease Non-Functioning Adenomas Craniopharyngiomas and Rathke's Cysts
  7. Based on long-term patient outcomes, researchers were able to identify six categories of common diagnostic and surgical failures. They include:

    • persistently high cortisol levels despite the successful removal of lesions
    • the failure of tumor resection
    • recurrence of disease
    • a failure to identify the source of ACTH secretion
    • the absence of identifiable lesions during exploratory surgery
    • concurrent tumors.

    Read more at https://cushieblog.com/2018/05/16/study-describes-6-common-surgical-failures-in-cushings-disease-treatment/

  8. MaryO

    PTSD and Cushings

    Since you asked this as a guest question, I posted it on one of the Cushing's blogs, too. Someone answered:
  9. Every ache or pain or out of the ordinary experience triggers anxiety. I am 7 years post op. I don’t have panic attacks per se, but I do get upset and frightened. These feelings also occur when the doctor sends me for routine testing just to make sure there is no relapse...

    In the comments area of https://cushieblogger.com/2018/05/11/guest-question-ptsd-and-cushings/

  10. MaryO

    Happy Mother's Day!

  11. Relacorilant, an investigational therapy developed by Corcept Therapeutics, may effectively manage the effects of excess cortisol in patients with Cushing’s syndrome, interim data from an ongoing Phase 2 trial show.

    In particular, the treatment significantly improved sugar tolerance and the levels of osteocalcin, a bone growth biomarker  commonly suppressed by excess cortisol.

    Read more at https://cushieblog.com/2018/05/12/relacorilant-effectively-manages-cortisol-effects-in-cushings-patients/

  12. I’m wondering if anyone post surgery is dealing with PTSD, specifically feeling like you are re-experiencing Cushings when you are having anxiety. I’m almost 3 years post surgery and have regular panic attacks where I feel like I am re-living having the disease

    Please either respond here or in the comments at https://cushieblogger.com/2018/05/11/guest-question-ptsd-and-cushings/

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  13. Shaw

    PTSD and Cushings

    Oh boy me too. I was paranoid for the first few years and anxious because I always thought Cushing's was coming back. Luckily I had family and a doctor who understood where I was coming from so I could test anytime I wanted to. It took a long time for me to remember things like women have PMS at times and that has nothing to do with Cushing's. I will say I only worried when I wasn't feeling great, when I feel good it never crosses my mind and these days I'm much better at not worrying or feeling anxiety about it.
  14. Guest

    PTSD and Cushings

    I’m wondering if anyone post surgery is dealing with PTSD, specifically feeling like you are re-experiencing Cushings when you are having anxiety. I’m almost 3 years post surgery and have regular panic attacks where I feel like I am re-living having the disease
  15. Today I challenge a wonderful woman who I really admire Mary Kelly O'Connor who can disregard if she's already been tagged or doesn't want to take part (completely understand as I know these posts can be annoying) but I just wanted to select you because as the founder of the website www.cushings-help.com that saved my life when I was diagnosed and I made some wonderful life-long friends all across the World as a result. I am so glad I found that website and the beautiful souls that shared their stories and wealth of knowledge.

    Read more at https://cushieblogger.com/testimonial/diane/

  16. Sadly, we lost another Cushing’s patient on Friday, May 9, 2014.  Melinda was a member of the Cushing’s Help message boards since Jun 24,  2007.

    She was only 25 and left behind a young son and many loving family members.

    Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2015/05/09/in-memory-of-melinda-smith-1988-2014/

  17. MaryO

    In Memory: Melinda Smith

    Sadly, we lost another Cushing’s patient on Friday, May 9, 2014. Melinda was a member of the Cushing’s Help message boards since Jun 24, 2007. She was only 25 and left behind a young son and many loving family members. Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2015/05/09/in-memory-of-melinda-smith-1988-2014/
  18. MaryO

    In Memory: Gregory J. Bart Jr.

    He died of a presumed heart attack. September 19, 2015 he said 'I was diagnosed hypertensive way back when I was 20. The condition remained for years, and became more acute with my cushings pit tumor. I still have high blood pressure, partially teated with three meds. I'll have to consult my doc and see if this may also be an issue.' More information at https://cushingsbios.com/2016/05/08/in-memory-gregory-j-bart-jr-may-7-2016/
  19. Summer is from Fresno CA.  She had pituitary surgery  1-24-17 and had a lot of trouble weaning off steroids post-op.

    Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2018/05/06/summer-j-summer84-pituitary-bio/

  20. Jane is from California.  She  76 years old and was recently diagnosed with Cushing's Syndrome after years and years and years of suffering symptoms.

    Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2018/05/05/sjw-jane-w-adrenal-bio/

  21. Adrenocortical carcinoma is a malignant tumor that develops in the cortex of the adrenal gland. It usually is identified by increased amounts of hormones that are produced by the adrenal glands, like cortisol.

    This tumor type is very rare in children, representing fewer than two in every 1,000 pediatric tumors.

    Read more at https://cushieblog.com/2018/05/05/rare-malignant-tumor-of-adrenal-gland-led-to-cushings-girls-death/

  22. In rare cases, Cushing’s syndrome may be caused by cortisol-secreting masses in both adrenal glands, a case report shows.

    Read more at https://cushieblog.com/2018/05/04/cushings-patient-exhibits-cortisol-secreting-lesions-in-both-adrenal-glands/

  23. Pam is from Ypsilanti, Michigan.  She is the mother of an 18 year old daughter who she suspects has Cushing's.

    Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2018/05/04/pam-m-mapgirl23-undiagnosed-bio/

  24. I’m in Indiana as well and undergoing testing now to confirm Cushing’s but I’m not impressed with the Endo my family doctor referred me to....

    In the comments area of https://cushingsbios.com/2018/01/20/stacy-b-pituitary-adrenal-bio/

  25. Mary Kelly O'Connor, you are an inspiration to so many! Thank you for all you have done and continue to do for our community!

    More at https://cushieblogger.com/testimonial/autumn/

  26. In Memory of Patti, 

    May 2, 2002

    From the Message Boards: ” I loved her, she was a great friend. She died of adrenal cortical carcinoma.”

    Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2015/05/02/in-memory-patti/

  27. Presented By Daniel Prevedello, MD Professor, Department of Neurological Surgery Director, Minimally Invasive Cranial Surgery Program Co-Director, Comprehensive Skull Base Center at The James Director, Pituitary Surgery Program The Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University After registering you will receive a confirmation email with details about joining the webinar. Contact us at webinar@pituitary.org with any questions or suggestions. Date: May 8, 2018 Time: 3:00 - 4:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time, 6:00 - 7:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time Webinar Information: Learning Objectives: Understand the importance of gland function preservation during pituitary surgery. Understand the importance of preserving nose function related to the approach. Understand the importance of team work in pituitary surgery Presenter Bio Dr. Prevedello is a professor in the Department of Neurological Surgery, and the director for the Minimally Invasive Cranial Surgery Program. He is one of only a few neurosurgeons in the world who have performed more than 1,000 Endoscopic Endonasal Approach (EEA) cases. EEA is a minimally invasive surgery technique that gives surgeons access to the base of the skull, intracranial cavity and top of the spine by operating through the nose and paranasal sinuses. Dr. Prevedello was rated in the top 10 percent of physicians in the nation for patient satisfaction in 2016 and 2017. Dr. Prevedello’s current research focus is on developing minimally invasive approaches to the brain and skull base that will result in the best surgical tumor resection possible with the least amount of disruption to normal tissue. Finding a patient treatment option that reduces the amount of long-term consequences for patients and their families is always his top priority. Dr. Prevedello's medical journey began in Brazil, where he attended medical school and finished his residency in 2005. He completed fellowships in neuroendocrine and pituitary surgery at the University of Virginia, and another in skull base and cerebrovascular surgery at the University of Pittsburgh.
  28. Presented By Daniel Prevedello, MD Professor, Department of Neurological Surgery Director, Minimally Invasive Cranial Surgery Program Co-Director, Comprehensive Skull Base Center at The James Director, Pituitary Surgery Program The Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University After registering you will receive a confirmation email with details about joining the webinar. Contact us at webinar@pituitary.org with any questions or suggestions. Date: May 8, 2018 Time: 3:00 - 4:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time, 6:00 - 7:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time Webinar Information: Learning Objectives: Understand the importance of gland function preservation during pituitary surgery. Understand the importance of preserving nose function related to the approach. Understand the importance of team work in pituitary surgery Presenter Bio Dr. Prevedello is a professor in the Department of Neurological Surgery, and the director for the Minimally Invasive Cranial Surgery Program. He is one of only a few neurosurgeons in the world who have performed more than 1,000 Endoscopic Endonasal Approach (EEA) cases. EEA is a minimally invasive surgery technique that gives surgeons access to the base of the skull, intracranial cavity and top of the spine by operating through the nose and paranasal sinuses. Dr. Prevedello was rated in the top 10 percent of physicians in the nation for patient satisfaction in 2016 and 2017. Dr. Prevedello’s current research focus is on developing minimally invasive approaches to the brain and skull base that will result in the best surgical tumor resection possible with the least amount of disruption to normal tissue. Finding a patient treatment option that reduces the amount of long-term consequences for patients and their families is always his top priority. Dr. Prevedello's medical journey began in Brazil, where he attended medical school and finished his residency in 2005. He completed fellowships in neuroendocrine and pituitary surgery at the University of Virginia, and another in skull base and cerebrovascular surgery at the University of Pittsburgh.
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