Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

Our Picks

Top content from across the community, hand-picked by us.

Can someone please offer help, ive been suffering for a year and just got blood results today with a high cortisol reading. My doctor said that my contraceptive pill could have caused this, however, I am not on the regular pill but on the POP progesteron only pill.

Is anyone aware of if this raises cortisol levels the same way the regular combined pill does?

Any help would be so very much appreciated!

 

Please respond here, on the message boards, or in the original post.

 

Thanks!
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Mr. Goacher's Son returns after 13 years to tell more of this story. Family's Despair over Rare Disease
Exclusive By Benjamin Parkes
THE family of a Chippenham man who died of a rare hormonal disorder have told of the despair his illness caused before it was diagnosed.
 
An inquest held in Flax Bourton on Tuesday ruled that John Goacher, 51, of Stonelea Close, died of natural causes on May 18 last year, after having surgery at Frenchay Hospital in Bristol.
 
The operation was intended to ease the symptoms of Cushing's Disease, which included obesity, a rounded face, increased fat around the neck and thinning arms and legs.
    • Like
  • 13 replies

Dexamethasone, a cheap and widely used steroid, has become the first drug shown to be able to save lives among Covid-19 patients in what scientists hailed as a “major breakthrough”.

Results of trials announced on Tuesday showed dexamethasone, which is used to reduce inflammation in other diseases, reduced death rates by around a third among the most severely ill Covid-19 patients admitted to hospital.

 




The results suggest the drug should immediately become standard care in patients with severe cases of the pandemic disease, said the researchers who led the trials.

“This is a result that shows that if patients who have Covid-19 and are on ventilators or are on oxygen are given dexamethasone, it will save lives, and it will do so at a remarkably low cost,” said Martin Landray, an Oxford University professor co-leading the trial, known as the RECOVERY trial.

“It’s going to be very hard for any drug really to replace this, given that for less than 50 pounds ($63.26), you can treat eight patients and save a life,” he told reporters in an online briefing.

His co-lead investigator, Peter Horby, said dexamethasone was “the only drug that’s so far shown to reduce mortality - and it reduces it significantly.”

“It is a major breakthrough,” he said. “Dexamethasone is inexpensive, on the shelf, and can be used immediately to save lives worldwide.”

 



There are currently no approved treatments or vaccines for Covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus which has killed more than 431,000 globally.

Saving ‘countless lives’

The RECOVERY trial compared outcomes of around 2,100 patients who were randomly assigned to get the steroid, with those of around 4,300 patients who did not get it.

The results suggest that one death would be prevented by treatment with dexamethasone among every eight ventilated Covid-19 patients, Landray said, and one death would be prevented among every 25 Covid-19 patients that received the drug and are on oxygen.
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Presented by Georgios A. Zenonos, MD

Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery
Associate Director, Center for Skull Base Surgery
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh PA, 15217
Presbyterian Hospital, Suite B400
 Register Now! 

 




After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. 

Date: Wednesday July 1, 2020

Time: 3:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time, 6:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
    • Like
  • 0 replies

https://doi.org/10.1016/S2213-8587(20)30215-1

Over the past few months, COVID-19, the pandemic disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, has been associated with a high rate of infection and lethality, especially in patients with comorbidities such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and immunodeficiency syndromes.

These cardiometabolic and immune impairments are common comorbidities of Cushing's syndrome, a condition characterised by excessive exposure to endogenous glucocorticoids. In patients with Cushing's syndrome, the increased cardiovascular risk factors, amplified by the increased thromboembolic risk, and the increased susceptibility to severe infections, are the two leading causes of death.

.....


In conclusion, COVID-19 might have specific clinical presentation, clinical course, and clinical complications in patients who also have Cushing's syndrome during the active hypercortisolaemic phase, and therefore careful monitoring and specific consideration should be given to this special, susceptible population. Moreover, the use of medical therapy as a bridge treatment while waiting for the pandemic to abate should be considered.
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Cushing's disease (CD) presents a marked female preponderance, but whether this skewed gender distribution has any relevance to the presentation and outcome of CD is not known.

The aim of the present study was the comparison of clinical features, biochemical indices of hypercortisolism, and surgical outcome among male and female patients with CD. The study population comprised 280 patients with CD (233 females, 47 males) collected by the Italian multicentre study.

Epidemiological data, frequency of clinical signs and symptoms, urinary free cortisol (UFC), plasma ACTH and cortisol levels, responses to dynamic testing, and surgical outcome were compared in female and male patients.

...

No difference in ACTH and cortisol responses to CRH, gradient at inferior petrosal sinus sampling, and cortisol inhibition after low-dose dexamethasone was recorded between sexes. In contrast, the sensitivity of the high-dose dexamethasone test was significantly lower in male than in female patients.

Of particular interest, symptoms indicative of hypercatabolic state were more frequent in male patients; indeed, males presented a higher prevalence of osteoporosis, muscle wasting, striae, and nephrolitiasis. Conversely, no symptom was more frequent in female patients with CD.

Patients with myopathy, hypokalemia, and purple striae presented significantly higher UFC levels, compared with patients without these symptoms. Lastly, in male patients, pituitary imaging was more frequently negative and immediate and late surgical outcome less favorable.

In conclusion, CD appeared at a younger age and with a more severe clinical presentation in males, compared with females, together with more pronounced elevation of cortisol and ACTH levels...
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Braun LT, Fazel J, Zopp S



Journal of Bone and Mineral Research


|



May 22, 2020








 







This study was attempted to assess bone mineral density and fracture rates in 89 patients with confirmed Cushing's syndrome at the time of diagnosis and 2 years after successful tumor resection. Researchers ascertained five bone turnover markers at the time of diagnosis, 1 and 2 years postoperatively. Via chemiluminescent immunoassays, they assessed bone turnover markers osteocalcin, intact procollagen‐IN‐propeptide, alkaline bone phosphatase, CrossLaps, and TrAcP 5b in plasma or serum. For comparison, they studied 71 gender‐, age‐, and BMI‐matched patients in whom Cushing's syndrome had been excluded. The outcomes of this research exhibit that the phase immediately after surgical remission from endogenous CS is defined by a high rate of bone turnover resulting in a striking net increase in bone mineral density in the majority of patients.

Read the full article on Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including:

Who should get an adrenalectomy?


How do you optimally replace adrenal hormones?


What laboratory tests are needed to monitor replacement?


When and how do you stress dose?


What about subcut cortisol versus cortisol pumps?


Patient Melissa will lead a Q and A


Sunday • May 17 • 6 PM PST
Click here on start your meeting or
https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=mb896b9ec88bc4e1163cf4194c55b248f
 
OR
Join by phone: (855) 797-9485
 
 
<br clear="ALL">
      Meeting Number (Access Code): 802 841 537 Your phone/computer will be muted on entry. 
Slides will be available on the day of the talk here
There will be plenty of time for questions using the chat button. Meeting Password: addison
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Hello Mary & dear Cushies!!

I’ve just discovered this article two months ago and I was very pleased to speak directly to Dr. Gerardo Burton.

He and his team developed a drug (21OH-6OP) which is a SPECIFIC antagonist for cortisol receptors, unlikely mifepristone which inhibits cortisol AND progesterone with so many undesired adverse effects.

Unfortunately the pharmaceutical company didn’t choose this drug to start the clinical trials and so it is resting in Dr. Burton’s lab.... since 2007.

The great humanity in Dr. Burton drop tears into my eyes when he told me that he would like that his whole work could help at least somebody to improve their quality of life. 

As a Cushing’s disease survivor ten years ago ... and now with a relapse of Cushing’s syndrome I keep wondering how is it possible that Dr. Burton’s work remains unknown,  wasted, buried and in oblivion.

For any of us either with Cushing’s Disease or Syndrome this drug is like the light at the end of the tunnel... I wish I could explain all this as clearly as I intended... and the reason why I post this topic is because I promised Dr. Burton I would try to help him to make his work known specially for all of us... and if somebody can help with a FDA contact and make this story known to them... that would be of so much help!!!

Thank to all of you for reading this, my best wishes for all... stay safe this pandemic

Regards from Querétaro, México

 Mayela 

https://www.intramed.net/contenidover.asp?contenidoid=48298 
    • Wow!
    • Like
  • 2 replies

Hi wondered if anyone could help me out - been suffering with these symptoms lately and wondered if cortisol could be the issue 

 

- Thinning legs 

- Fat building in the trunk (abdomen and chest)

- Seemingly more fat under my chin 

- Excessive fatigue even after a nights sleep 

- Weak muscles - mainly back /arms and shoulders 

- muscle wasting 

- Feeling very low and anxious 

 

Thanks in advance , 
  • 1 reply



Abstract

Background

Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery (ETS) for the resection of pituitary adenoma has become more common throughout the past decade. Although most patients have a short postoperative hospitalization, others require a more prolonged stay. We aimed to identify predictors for prolonged hospitalization in the setting of ETS for pituitary adenomas.

Methods

A retrospective chart review as performed on 658 patients undergoing ETS for pituitary adenoma at a single tertiary care academic center from 2005 to 2019. Length of stay (LoS) was defined as date of surgery to date of discharge. Patients with LoS in the top 10th percentile (prolonged LoS [PLS] >4 days, N = 72) were compared with the remainder (standard LoS [SLS], N = 586).

Results

The average age was 54 years and 52.5% were male. The mean LoS was 2.1 days vs 7.5 days (SLS vs PLS). On univariate analysis, atrial fibrillation (p = 0.002), hypertension (p = 0.033), partial tumor resection (p < 0.001), apoplexy (p = 0.020), intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid (ioCSF) leak (p = 0.001), nasoseptal flap (p = 0.049), postoperative diabetes insipidus (DI) (p = 0.010), and readmission within 30 days (p = 0.025) were significantly associated with PLS. Preoperative continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) (odds ratio, 15.144; 95% confidence interval, 2.596‐88.346; p = 0.003) and presence of an ioCSF leak (OR, 10.362; 95% CI, 2.143‐50.104; p = 0.004) remained significant on multivariable analysis.

Conclusion

For patients undergoing ETS for pituitary adenomas, an ioCSF leak or preoperative use of CPAP predicted PLS. Additional common reasons for PLS included postoperative CSF leak (10 of 72), management of DI or hypopituitarism (15 of 72), or reoperation due to surgical or medical complications (14 of 72).

 
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Presented by


Jamie J. Van Gompel, M.D., B.S., Professor in Neurosurgery and Otolaryngology specializing in endoscopic/open skull base focusing on Pituitary tumors as well as Epilepsy at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, USA

and
Garret W. Choby, M.D., a fellowship-trained rhinologist and endoscopic skull base surgeon practicing at the Mayo Clinic.

Objectives:




-          Understand the additional considerations that are key to performing endonasal surgery during the COVID pandemic
-          Identify the practice changes that are allowing pituitary surgery to proceed safely
-          Characterize the nasal cavity and nasopharynx as a reservoir for the coronavirus
-          Identify the risk of undergoing pituitary surgery during the Covid -19 pandemic




Register Now! 



 




After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. 

Date: Monday, May 11, 2020

Time: 4:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time  - 5:15 PM Pacific Daylight Time
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Presented by

Nelson M. Oyesiku, MD, PhD, FACS
Professor of Neurosurgery and Medicine
Vice-Chairman, Neurosurgery Residency Program Director
Emory University School of Medicine

Register Now!

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

 

Date: Sunday, May 10, 2020

Time: 11:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time to 12:15 PM Pacific Daylight Time/ 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including:

Who should get an adrenalectomy?


How do you optimally replace adrenal hormones?


What laboratory tests are needed to monitor replacement?


When and how do you stress dose?


What about subcut cortisol versus cortisol pumps?


Patient Melissa will lead a Q and A



Sunday • May 17 • 6 PM PST
Click here on start your meeting or
https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=mb896b9ec88bc4e1163cf4194c55b248f

OR
Join by phone: (855) 797-9485

<br clear="ALL">
      Meeting Number (Access Code): 802 841 537 Your phone/computer will be muted on entry.
Slides will be available on the day of the talk here
There will be plenty of time for questions using the chat button. Meeting Password: addison
For more information, email us at mail@goodhormonehealth.com
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Cushing syndrome, a rare endocrine disorder caused by abnormally excessive amounts of the hormone cortisol, has a new pharmaceutical treatment to treat cortisol overproduction.

Osilodrostat (Isturisa) is the first FDA approved drug who either can’t undergo pituitary gland surgery or have undergone the surgery but still have the disease. The oral tablet functions by blocking the enzyme responsible for cortisol synthesis, 11-beta-hydroxylase.

“Until now, patients in need of medications…have had few approved options, either with limited efficacy or with too many adverse effects. With this demonstrated effective oral treatment, we have a therapeutic option that will help address patients' needs in this underserved patient population," said Maria Fleseriu, MD, FACE, professor of medicine and neurological surgery and director of the Pituitary Center at Oregon Health Sciences University.

Cushing disease is caused by a pituitary tumor that releases too much of the hormone that stimulates cortisol production, adrenocorticotropin. This causes excessive levels of cortisol, a hormone responsible for helping to maintain blood sugar levels, regulate metabolism, help reduce inflammation, assist in memory formulation, and support fetus development during pregnancy.

The condition is most common among adults aged 30-50 and affects women 3 times more than men.

Cushing disease can lead to a number of medical issues including high blood pressure, obesity, type 2 diabetes, blood clots in the arms and legs, bone loss and fractures, a weakened immune system, and depression. Patients with Cushing disease may also have thin arms and legs, a round red full face, increased fat around the neck, easy bruising, striae (purple stretch marks), or weak muscles.

Side effects of osilodrostat occurring in more than 20% of patients are...
    • Like
  • 0 replies

My GP has suspected Cushings for a while now. I have the extreme fatigue, muscle weakness, round face, facial flushing, Buffalo hump, weight gain right in midsection - all the alleged tale-tell signs. However, I’ve had to urine tests and one blood test and they are always normal. I’m seeing a third endo now and she agrees with my GP and plans to do another series of blood tests. I guess my question is has anyone else out there ever had initial normal cortisol test results only to later find out it’s Cushings? 
  • 9 replies

Endocrinologists have underlined the importance that physicians consider "a stress dose" of glucocorticoids in the event of severe COVID-19 infection in endocrine, and other, patients on long-term steroids.

 

People taking corticosteroids on a routine basis for a variety of underlying inflammatory conditions, such as asthma, allergies, and arthritis, are at elevated risk of being infected with, and adversely affected by, COVID-19. 

 

This also applies to a rarer group of patients with adrenal insufficiency and uncontrolled Cushing syndrome, as well as secondary adrenal insufficiency occurring in hypopituitarism, who also rely on glucocorticoids for day-to-day living.

 

In the event of COVID-19, all of these individuals may be unable to mount a normal stress response, and "in the case of adrenal suppression...such patients may run into severe difficulties, particularly if on intensive care units," warns Paul Stewart, MD, University of Leeds, UK, and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

 

As such, it is vitally important to recognize that "Injectable supplemental glucocorticoid therapy in this setting can reverse the risk of potentially fatal adrenal failure and should be considered in every case," Stewart and colleagues emphasize in a newly published editorial in JCEM.

 

They note this advice must be considered alongside World Health Organization (WHO) guidance against prescribing therapeutic glucocorticoids to treat complications of COVID-19, based on prior experience in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, as well as those affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS).
    • Like
  • 0 replies

With the novel COVID-19 virus continuing to spread, it is crucial to adhere to the advice from experts and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to help reduce risk of infection for individuals and the population at large. This is particularly important for people with adrenal insufficiency and people with uncontrolled Cushing’s Syndrome.

Studies have reported that individuals with adrenal insufficiency have an increased rate of respiratory infection-related deaths, possibly due to impaired immune function. As such, people with adrenal insufficiency should observe the following recommendations:

Maintain social distancing to reduce the risk of contracting COVID-19


Continue taking medications as prescribed


Ensure appropriate supplies for oral and injectable steroids at home, ideally a 90-day preparation


In the case of hydrocortisone shortages, ask your pharmacist and physician about replacement with different strengths of hydrocortisone tablets that might be available. Hydrocortisone (or brand name Cortef) tablets have 5 mg, 10 mg or 20 mg strength




In cases of acute illness, increase the hydrocortisone dose per instructions and call the physician’s office for more details


Follow sick day rules for increasing oral glucocorticoids or injectables per your physician’s recommendations


In general, patients should double their usual glucocorticoid dose in times of acute illness


In case of inability to take oral glucocorticoids, contact your physician for alternative medicines and regimens...
    • Like
  • 0 replies

So, with the reality that social distancing is a must, how are you all handling that emotionally?

How do you stay connected and not isolated?

Do you have a plan? 

I've made one for my piano studio but I don't really have one for my family other than stocking up on food, sorta.  I already had a lot of hand sanitizer thanks to the piano students and my need to inject growth hormone every day.

If you want to chat, let me know and we can get it done.

 
    • Like
  • 0 replies

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Isturisa (osilodrostat) oral tablets for adults with Cushing's disease who either cannot undergo pituitary gland surgery or have undergone the surgery but still have the disease. Cushing's disease is a rare disease in which the adrenal glands make too much of the cortisol hormone. Isturisa is the first FDA-approved drug to directly address this cortisol overproduction by blocking the enzyme known as 11-beta-hydroxylase and preventing cortisol synthesis.

"The FDA supports the development of safe and effective treatments for rare diseases, and this new therapy can help people with Cushing's disease, a rare condition where excessive cortisol production puts them at risk for other medical issues," said Mary Thanh Hai, M.D., acting director of the Office of Drug Evaluation II in the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. "By helping patients achieve normal cortisol levels, this medication is an important treatment option for adults with Cushing's disease."

Cushing's disease is caused by a pituitary tumor that releases too much of a hormone called adrenocorticotropin, which stimulates the adrenal gland to produce an excessive amount of cortisol. The disease is most common among adults between the ages of 30 to 50, and it affects women three times more often than men. Cushing's disease can cause significant health issues, such as high blood pressure, obesity, type 2 diabetes, blood clots in the legs and lungs, bone loss and fractures, a weakened immune system and depression. Patients may have thin arms and legs, a round red full face, increased fat around the neck, easy bruising, striae (purple stretch marks) and weak muscles. 
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Along with all of you, NADF is monitoring this outbreak by paying close attention to CDC and FDA updates. We have also asked our Medical Advisor to help answer your important questions as they come up.

We asked Medical Director Paul Margulies, MD, FACE, FACP to help us with this question:

Question: Does Adrenal Insufficiency cause us to have a weakened immune system and therefore make us more susceptible?

Response: Individuals with adrenal insufficiency on replacement doses of glucocorticoids do not have a suppressed immune system. The autoimmune mechanism that causes Addison’s disease does not cause an immune deficiency that would make one more likely to get an infection. The problem is with the individual’s ability to deal with the stress of an infection once it develops. Those with adrenal insufficiency fall into that category. When sick with a viral infection, they can have a more serious illness, and certainly require stress dose steroids to help to respond to the illness. If someone with adrenal insufficiency contracts the coronavirus, it is more likely to lead to the need for supportive care, including hospitalization.

This information from the CDC Website provides important information regarding Prevention & Treatment.  You can find this information here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/prevention-treatment.html

 

From https://www.nadf.us/
    • Like
  • 0 replies

The Barrow Pituitary Center is dedicated to educating patients, caregivers, and loved ones by providing information which is current and non-biased. Experts at this conference will address management of the emotional and physical elements of living with pituitary disorders. We hope attendees will leave empowered to make better informed decisions about their healthcare and achieve their goals for a long and fruitful life.

Saturday, March 14, 2020
8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
$30 per person

    • Like
  • 0 replies

Presented by

Varun Kshettry, MD
Director, Advanced Endoscopic & Microscopic Neurosurgery
Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

Register Now

After registering you will receive a confirmation email with details about joining the webinar.

 

Date: Tuesday, February 18, 2020 
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Pacific Standard Time, 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Eastern Standard Time

Learning Objectives:

Discuss patient expectations for pituitary surgery and recovery
Discuss best practices to minimize risk of complications
What questions to ask your medical providers
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Published: 13 January 2020

Abstract

Background

Primary aldosteronism (PA) plus subclinical Cushing’s syndrome (SCS), PASCS, has occasionally been reported. We aimed to clinically characterize patients with PASCS who are poorly profiled.

Methods

A population-based, retrospective, single-center, observational study was conducted in 71 patients (age, 58.2 ± 11.2 years; 24 males and 47 females) who developed PA (n = 45), SCS (n = 12), or PASCS (n = 14). The main outcome measures were the proportion of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), serum potassium concentration, and maximum tumor diameter (MTD) on the computed tomography (CT) scans.

Results

The proportion of DM patients was significantly greater in the PASCS group than in the PA group (50.0% vs. 13.9%, p <  0.05), without a significant difference between the PASCS and SCS groups. Serum potassium concentration was significantly lower in the PASCS group than in the SCS group (3.2 ± 0.8 mEq/L vs. 4.0 ± 0.5 mEq/L; p <  0.01), without a significant difference between the PASCS and PA groups. Among the 3 study groups of patients who had a unilateral adrenal tumor, MTD was significantly greater in the PASCS group than in the PA group (2.7 ± 0.1 cm vs. 1.4 ± 0.1 cm; p <  0.001), without a significant difference between the PASCS and SCS groups.

Conclusions

Any reference criteria were not obtained that surely distinguish patients with PASCS from those with PA or SCS. However, clinicians should suspect the presence of concurrent SCS in patients with PA when detecting a relatively large adrenal tumor on the CT scans.

    • Like
  • 0 replies

Houston Methodist neurosurgeons and neuroscientists are looking at a new way to classify pituitary tumors that could lead to more precise and accurate diagnosing for patients in the future.

Found in up to 10% of the population, pituitary tumors, also called adenomas, are noncancerous growths on the pituitary gland and very common. Although these pituitary tumors are benign in nature, they pose a major health challenge in patients.

The new tests being investigated at Houston Methodist not only have the potential to lead to better diagnoses for patients with pituitary adenomas, but also for many other types of brain tumors in the future. The findings, which were published Jan. 28 in Scientific Reports, an online journal from Nature Publishing Group, describe a new way being looked at to study the blood of patients with pituitary tumors to determine exactly what tumor type they have and whether they might respond to medical treatment rather than surgery.

"Often called the 'master gland,' the pituitary gland controls the entire endocrine system and regulates various body functions by secreting hormones into the bloodstream to control such things as metabolism, growth and development, reproduction and sleep," said corresponding author Kumar Pichumani, Ph.D., a research physicist at the Houston Methodist Research Institute. "When pituitary adenomas occur, they may secrete too much of one or more hormones that could lead to a variety of issues, ranging from infertility and sexual dysfunction to vision problems and osteoporosis, among many other health problems."

Neurosurgeon David S. Baskin, M.D., director of the Kenneth R. Peak Center for Brain and Pituitary Tumor Treatment and Research in the Department of Neurosurgery at Houston Methodist Hospital, collaborated with Pichumani on this study. He said some pituitary tumors can be treated with medication rather than surgery, but a precise diagnosis of the type of tumor someone has and what hormone it's secreting is essential for proper treatment. This is sometimes very difficult to do based on standard endocrine hormone testing.
    • Like
  • 0 replies

×
×
  • Create New...