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MaryO

~Chief Cushie~
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MaryO last won the day on May 25

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About MaryO

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  • Birthday September 22

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    Female
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    Northern Virginia
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    My family, computers, music, reading, ice cream, handbells, the Internet, Chinese Food, chocolate, watching ice skating competitions, napping, piano duets, Kindle, iPad...in no particular order.

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  1. Braun LT, Fazel J, Zopp S Journal of Bone and Mineral Research | May 22, 2020 This study was attempted to assess bone mineral density and fracture rates in 89 patients with confirmed Cushing's syndrome at the time of diagnosis and 2 years after successful tumor resection. Researchers ascertained five bone turnover markers at the time of diagnosis, 1 and 2 years postoperatively. Via chemiluminescent immunoassays, they assessed bone turnover markers osteocalcin, intact procollagen‐IN‐propeptide, alkaline bone phosphatase, CrossLaps, and TrAcP 5b in plasma or serum. For comparison, they studied 71 gender‐, age‐, and BMI‐matched patients in whom Cushing's syndrome had been excluded. The outcomes of this research exhibit that the phase immediately after surgical remission from endogenous CS is defined by a high rate of bone turnover resulting in a striking net increase in bone mineral density in the majority of patients. Read the full article on Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.
  2. Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including: Who should get an adrenalectomy? How do you optimally replace adrenal hormones? What laboratory tests are needed to monitor replacement? When and how do you stress dose? What about subcut cortisol versus cortisol pumps? Patient Melissa will lead a Q and A Sunday • May 17 • 6 PM PST Click here on start your meeting or https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=mb896b9ec88bc4e1163cf4194c55b248f OR Join by phone: (855) 797-9485 Meeting Number (Access Code): 802 841 537 Your phone/computer will be muted on entry. Slides will be available on the day of the talk here There will be plenty of time for questions using the chat button. Meeting Password: addison
  3. Thank you so much, Mayela - I'll definitely check this out. We need all the help we can get and I'm glad that Dr. Burton is trying to help Cushing's patients. 13 years is a long time to withhold a potentially helpful drug. I'm so sorry you're having a relapse Are you planning another pituitary surgery, BLA or something else?
  4. Those are all definitely symptoms of Cushing's...and excess cortisol. I think I had every one of them while I was being diagnosed. Have you taken steroids, especially often? They can cause these symptoms. Definitely mention these symptoms to your doctor. Please keep us posted.
  5. MaryO

    Naturopath

    Heidi, my first instinct was to say no but I did a search of the boards and found 177 posts on this topic so some people have actually gone this route. If you join the boards, you can read those responses. My reasoning for saying no was that if you have Cushing's, it is generally caused by a tumor and surgery is the only way to deal with the tumor. If Cushing's is caused by taking steroids, weaning off the steroids can sometimes help. Have you been diagnosed with Cushing's? If so, do you know what type? Best of luck to you!
  6. First published:03 May 2020 Read the entire article at https://doi.org/10.1002/alr.22540 Potential conflict of interest: None disclosed. Presented at the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Rhinologic Society, on September 14, 2019, in New Orleans, LA. Abstract Background Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery (ETS) for the resection of pituitary adenoma has become more common throughout the past decade. Although most patients have a short postoperative hospitalization, others require a more prolonged stay. We aimed to identify predictors for prolonged hospitalization in the setting of ETS for pituitary adenomas. Methods A retrospective chart review as performed on 658 patients undergoing ETS for pituitary adenoma at a single tertiary care academic center from 2005 to 2019. Length of stay (LoS) was defined as date of surgery to date of discharge. Patients with LoS in the top 10th percentile (prolonged LoS [PLS] >4 days, N = 72) were compared with the remainder (standard LoS [SLS], N = 586). Results The average age was 54 years and 52.5% were male. The mean LoS was 2.1 days vs 7.5 days (SLS vs PLS). On univariate analysis, atrial fibrillation (p = 0.002), hypertension (p = 0.033), partial tumor resection (p < 0.001), apoplexy (p = 0.020), intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid (ioCSF) leak (p = 0.001), nasoseptal flap (p = 0.049), postoperative diabetes insipidus (DI) (p = 0.010), and readmission within 30 days (p = 0.025) were significantly associated with PLS. Preoperative continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) (odds ratio, 15.144; 95% confidence interval, 2.596‐88.346; p = 0.003) and presence of an ioCSF leak (OR, 10.362; 95% CI, 2.143‐50.104; p = 0.004) remained significant on multivariable analysis. Conclusion For patients undergoing ETS for pituitary adenomas, an ioCSF leak or preoperative use of CPAP predicted PLS. Additional common reasons for PLS included postoperative CSF leak (10 of 72), management of DI or hypopituitarism (15 of 72), or reoperation due to surgical or medical complications (14 of 72). From https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/alr.22540?af=R
  7. Presented by Jamie J. Van Gompel, M.D., B.S., Professor in Neurosurgery and Otolaryngology specializing in endoscopic/open skull base focusing on Pituitary tumors as well as Epilepsy at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, USA and Garret W. Choby, M.D., a fellowship-trained rhinologist and endoscopic skull base surgeon practicing at the Mayo Clinic. Objectives: - Understand the additional considerations that are key to performing endonasal surgery during the COVID pandemic - Identify the practice changes that are allowing pituitary surgery to proceed safely - Characterize the nasal cavity and nasopharynx as a reservoir for the coronavirus - Identify the risk of undergoing pituitary surgery during the Covid -19 pandemic Register Now! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. Date: Monday, May 11, 2020 Time: 4:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time - 5:15 PM Pacific Daylight Time
  8. Presented by Jamie J. Van Gompel, M.D., B.S., Professor in Neurosurgery and Otolaryngology specializing in endoscopic/open skull base focusing on Pituitary tumors as well as Epilepsy at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, USA and Garret W. Choby, M.D., a fellowship-trained rhinologist and endoscopic skull base surgeon practicing at the Mayo Clinic. Objectives: - Understand the additional considerations that are key to performing endonasal surgery during the COVID pandemic - Identify the practice changes that are allowing pituitary surgery to proceed safely - Characterize the nasal cavity and nasopharynx as a reservoir for the coronavirus - Identify the risk of undergoing pituitary surgery during the Covid -19 pandemic Register Now! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. Date: Monday, May 11, 2020 Time: 4:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time - 5:15 PM Pacific Daylight Time
  9. Presented by Nelson M. Oyesiku, MD, PhD, FACS Professor of Neurosurgery and Medicine Vice-Chairman, Neurosurgery Residency Program Director Emory University School of Medicine Register Now! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. Date: Sunday, May 10, 2020 Time: 11:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time to 12:15 PM Pacific Daylight Time/ 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time
  10. Presented by Nelson M. Oyesiku, MD, PhD, FACS Professor of Neurosurgery and Medicine Vice-Chairman, Neurosurgery Residency Program Director Emory University School of Medicine Register Now! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. Date: Sunday, May 10, 2020 Time: 11:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time to 12:15 PM Pacific Daylight Time/ 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time
  11. Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including: Who should get an adrenalectomy? How do you optimally replace adrenal hormones? What laboratory tests are needed to monitor replacement? When and how do you stress dose? What about subcut cortisol versus cortisol pumps? Patient Melissa will lead a Q and A Sunday • May 17 • 6 PM PST Click here on start your meeting or https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=mb896b9ec88bc4e1163cf4194c55b248f OR Join by phone: (855) 797-9485 Meeting Number (Access Code): 802 841 537 Your phone/computer will be muted on entry. Slides will be available on the day of the talk here There will be plenty of time for questions using the chat button. Meeting Password: addison For more information, email us at mail@goodhormonehealth.com
  12. Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including: Who should get an adrenalectomy? How do you optimally replace adrenal hormones? What laboratory tests are needed to monitor replacement? When and how do you stress dose? What about subcut cortisol versus cortisol pumps? Patient Melissa will lead a Q and A Sunday • May 17 • 6 PM PST Click here on start your meeting or https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=mb896b9ec88bc4e1163cf4194c55b248f OR Join by phone: (855) 797-9485 Meeting Number (Access Code): 802 841 537 Your phone/computer will be muted on entry. Slides will be available on the day of the talk here There will be plenty of time for questions using the chat button. Meeting Password: addison For more information, email us at mail@goodhormonehealth.com
  13. MaryO

    Normal Cortisol tests

    More responses: And
  14. Cushing syndrome, a rare endocrine disorder caused by abnormally excessive amounts of the hormone cortisol, has a new pharmaceutical treatment to treat cortisol overproduction. Osilodrostat (Isturisa) is the first FDA approved drug who either can’t undergo pituitary gland surgery or have undergone the surgery but still have the disease. The oral tablet functions by blocking the enzyme responsible for cortisol synthesis, 11-beta-hydroxylase. “Until now, patients in need of medications…have had few approved options, either with limited efficacy or with too many adverse effects. With this demonstrated effective oral treatment, we have a therapeutic option that will help address patients' needs in this underserved patient population," said Maria Fleseriu, MD, FACE, professor of medicine and neurological surgery and director of the Pituitary Center at Oregon Health Sciences University. Cushing disease is caused by a pituitary tumor that releases too much of the hormone that stimulates cortisol production, adrenocorticotropin. This causes excessive levels of cortisol, a hormone responsible for helping to maintain blood sugar levels, regulate metabolism, help reduce inflammation, assist in memory formulation, and support fetus development during pregnancy. The condition is most common among adults aged 30-50 and affects women 3 times more than men. Cushing disease can lead to a number of medical issues including high blood pressure, obesity, type 2 diabetes, blood clots in the arms and legs, bone loss and fractures, a weakened immune system, and depression. Patients with Cushing disease may also have thin arms and legs, a round red full face, increased fat around the neck, easy bruising, striae (purple stretch marks), or weak muscles. Side effects of osilodrostat occurring in more than 20% of patients are adrenal insufficiency, headache, nausea, fatigue, and edema. Other side effects can include vomiting, hypocortisolism (low cortisol levels), QTc prolongation (heart rhythm condition), elevations in adrenal hormone precursors (inactive substance converted into hormone), and androgens (hormone that regulated male characteristics). Osilodrostat’s safety and effectiveness was evaluated in a study consisting of 137 patients, of which about 75% were women. After a 24-week period, about half of patients had achieved normal cortisol levels; 71 successful cases then entered an 8-week, double-blind, randomized withdrawal study where 86% of patients receiving osilodrostat maintained normal cortisol levels, compared with 30% who were taking a placebo. In January 2020, the European Commission also granted marketing authorization for osilodrostat. From https://www.ajmc.com/newsroom/patients-with-cushing-have-new-nonsurgical-treatment-option
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