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Lorri

Over 2000 Posts
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About Lorri

  • Rank
    Member of the 1000 Post
  • Birthday 09/16/1963

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    http://lorrilee3@yahoo.com
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  • Location
    Toney, AL
  1. Psstt!!! Hey chickie! I wub u!

  2. If anyone else is having a problem this is what I did. I copied and pasted it to get it to come up. http://cushie-blogger.blogspot.com/2008/09...lyte-chart.html
  3. Mary, I can't get either to work for me. Hugs, Lorri
  4. Hey Queen Dork of the Universe (as you call yourself). You are in my thoughts and prayers and I can't wait to talk to you when you get home!! I love you and miss you too! Get well!!

  5. Mar, Oh girl!!! I am so excited for you!!! I wish you the best of luck with the show, I know you will be great!! I hate that I can never listen to it live or call in, but you know my heart is there with you!! Luv you, Lorri
  6. Flavoring Food May Promote Weight Loss http://www.everydayhealth.com/publicsite/S...Health_20080619 Published: 06/16/08 MONDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Boosting the flavor of your food with calorie-free seasonings and sweeteners may help you feel fuller faster and decrease the amount you eat, according to a U.S. study that suggests this may be a new way to help people lose weight. The study of "tastants" -- substances that can stimulate the sense of taste -- included 2,436 overweight or obese people who were asked to sprinkle a variety of savory or sweet crystals on their food before eating their meals. They used the salt-free savory crystals on salty foods and used the sugar-free sweet crystals on sweet or neutral-tasting foods. The participants didn't know what the flavors of the crystals were, other than salty or sweet. The hidden flavors of the savory tastants were cheddar cheese, onion, horseradish, ranch dressing, taco, and parmesan. The flavors of the sweet tastants were cocoa, spearmint, banana, strawberry, raspberry and malt. A control group of 100 people didn't use tastants. Both groups continued their normal diet and exercise habits during the study. At the start of the study, the treatment group had an average weight of 208 pounds and an average body mass index (BMI) of 34, which is considered obese. After six months of using the tastants, the 1,436 people in the treatment group who completed the study lost an average of 30.5 pounds, and their BMI decreased by an average of five points. In the control group, the average weight loss was two pounds, and the average BMI decrease was 0.3. The findings were to be presented at the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in San Francisco. The people in the treatment group may have lost more weight than those in the control group, because the tastants made them feel full faster, and they ate less, suggested study author Dr. Alan Hirsh, founder and neurologic director of the Smell & Taste Treatment and Research Foundation in Chicago. Another possibility is that the tastants improved the flavor of bland but healthy foods such as tofu and some vegetables, resulting in healthier eating habits. Tastants aren't commercially available, but people can use techniques of enhancing their senses of smell and taste to help them lose weight, Hirsch said. "Sniff your food before you eat it. Chew it a lot. Choose low-calorie foods and season them," he said. In another study to be presented at the Endocrine Society meeting, researchers found that three months of aerobic exercise decreased body fat and calorie intake in overweight and obese people. These changes were linked to increased levels of a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), said the team from the University of Chile Clinical Hospital in Santiago. BDNF's main role is to promote the growth and survival of nerve cells, but recent research has shown that BDNF also is related to obesity and metabolism. This study included 15 overweight or obese men and women, ages 26 to 51, who did a three-month program of aerobic exercise on a treadmill and bicycle. They were told they could continue to eat their usual number of calories. At the end of the study, the participants had decreased BMI, waist circumference, and blood pressure, and reported consuming fewer calories than at the start of the study. They also had increased levels of BDNF. The higher the concentration of BDNF, the fewer calories participants consumed and the greater the weight loss. This suggests that BDNF acts as an appetite suppressant, the researchers said. They noted that identifying markers such as BDNF may help health care providers determine which patients will benefit from exercise.
  7. Low-Salt Diet May Not Be Best for Heart Published: 06/04/08 WEDNESDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- Surprising new research suggests that a diet low in salt may be worse for your heart than eating lots of salt, but don't start eating potato chips just yet. "No one should run out and buy a salt shaker to try to improve their cardiovascular health. But we think it's reasonable to say that different people have different needs," said study author Dr. Hillel W. Cohen, an associate professor of epidemiology and population health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. The study, published online in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, doesn't confirm that a low-salt diet itself is bad for the heart. But it does say that people who eat the least salt suffer from the highest rates of death from cardiac disease. "Our findings suggest that one cannot simply assume, without evidence, that lower salt diets 'can't hurt,' " Cohen said. Cohen and his colleagues looked at a federal health survey of about 8,700 Americans between 1988 and 1994. All were over 30, and none were on special low-salt diets. The researchers then checked to see what happened to the volunteers by the year 2000. Even after the researchers adjusted their statistics to account for the effect of cardiac risk factors like smoking and diabetes, the 25 percent of the population who ate the least salt were 80 percent more likely to die of cardiac disease than the 25 percent who ate the most salt. Cohen doesn't discount that salt could be bad for some people. However, "the main argument for reducing salt in prevention of heart disease has been that there's a relationship between higher sodium and higher blood pressure," he said. "There have been many studies of this relationship, but when one actually looks at the numbers, the average blood pressure difference associated with quite a bit of sodium intake is very modest." He questions telling healthy people to cut down on salt, especially when modest changes may have no effect. "For most people, especially those whose blood pressure is normal, why are you telling them they shouldn't have salt?" The study was not designed to detect a direct cause-and-effect relationship between consumption of salt and cardiac death. Instead, it only looked at a potential link. It's possible that salt consumption could reflect some other factor that's playing a greater role, although Cohen said the researchers tried to account for that possibility. Existing disease could be a hidden factor, said Howard Sesso, an assistant professor of medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. According to him, the study authors may not have been able to account for every survey participant who reduced salt intake because of heart disease, high blood pressure or diabetes. Overall, Sesso said, research about the hazards of salt remains mixed. "Patients with normal blood pressure can continue to consume salt, but in moderation and keeping in mind that it is the entire dietary portfolio that matters most."
  8. Hey girlfriend!! Love ya!!!

  9. SFAM...Sister's From Another Mother!!! Hi Sis, just wanted you to know you are the greatest!! Have a great YEAR!! This will be the one for you!!! Love you bunches, Lorri

  10. LOVELOVELOVELOVELOVELOVELOVELOVELOVELOVELOVELOVELOVELOVELOVELOVE!!!

  11. When I went to camp cushie and the last few days was taking the dex pills, I was bouncing off the walls and having the time of my life. My cushie partner did not have the same reaction and we both suppressed. I think it just depends on the person. But I loved it!!! I got to site see and it was pain free. Hugs, Lorri
  12. Way to go Cindy!! What a wonderful man IMCC is to us. I'm truly sorry for all that you are dealing with, but thankful that you are willing to share the information for other cushies. Who knows, we question God "WHY"! Maybe this is your why!!! Love you, Lorri
  13. Terry, I wanted to wish you a great interview and show. I know you will be wonderful and I hope I can hear it one day. I can't listen live because of the time it's on I'm in commute from work. But good luck and I'll have to listen to the recorded version. You have a lot to offer. Break a leg, Hugs, Lorri
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