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peaches

ChattyCushie
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peaches last won the day on August 27 2010

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About peaches

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  1. I get over here every now and then. How have you been?

  2. I just stopped by to see if you were still around here! I need to come back more often!!

  3. Well day two and I already caved. I had one medium diet Ginger Ale which I craved until I got one. This is gonna be tough!
  4. No offense here. I really didn't post the article with the intention to correlate aspartame with weight gain/loss. It was more for the effects of aspartame on the endocrine system. I never researched endocrine disruptor's prior to my surgery, maybe I have become a bit OCD with eliminating pesticides, soaps, laundry detergent ( Don't worry I'm not avoiding bathing I buy paraben free chemical free and make my own laundry soap), now it's on to certain foods. I never realized how many chemicals contribute to endocrine disorders. I know I can't eliminate all of them but aspartame will be one. It's killing me because my hubs drinks Coke Zero and it's sitting in my fridge as I type I tried sparkling water La Cruix and it is defiantly going to take some getting use to! I can't have fruit juice because I am also trying to eat a yeast free diet for a while, I like water and green tea so I will manage.
  5. http://www.laleva.cc/food/aspartame_awareness.html
  6. I am guilty of drinking sometimes 4 liters of Coke Zero in a 24 hour period. I have often wondered if aspartame in these drinks can damage the endocrine system. If I think back to my high school day when I was skinny I can remember starting to pile on the weight after consuming Diet Dr.Pepper, could have been my diet but I doubt it. It wasn't enough weight to be alarmed but it was enough to gain a pant size. Below is an interesting article on the effects of aspertame on the nuclei that transmits signals to the hypothalamus. http://dorway.com/dorwblog/doctors-speak-out/aspartame-msg-other-excitotoxins-the-hypothalamus/ Aspartame, MSG, Excitotoxins & the Hypothalamus By Russell L. Blaylock, M.D. The hypothalamus is a small area of the brain, no larger than the fingernail, that despite its small size, is responsible for controlling some of the most vital neural systems in the body. The wiring of the hypothalamus is some of the most complex in the nervous system, with connections not only to the pituitary, but also to the limbic system (emotional control system), hippocampus, striatum and brain stem. Through these connections it regulates emotions, autonomic control ( parasympathetic and sympathetic), hunger and satiety, immunity, memory input, and anger control. Disruptions in this vital piece of brain can result in anything from minor behavioral problems or endocrine malfunctions to major disruptions in sexual functions, obesity, immune suppression and endocrine gland failure. Newer findings indicate that the hypothalamus is involved in several endocrine syndromes, neurological diseases and even psychiatric disorders. As early as 1976, it was shown that aspartame feeding in mice could produce lesions in the hypothalamus of newborns. It should be realized that these are lesions (injuries) that can be seen through an ordinary light microscope. While the lesions produced by aspartame doses equiavlent to MSG will produce smaller lesions, they are significant none the less. Defenders of the safety of aspartame and MSG often report studies that have shown no damage to the hypothalamus when seen under the light microscope. Several studies have shown that the neurons can be injured without such visible physical damage being present. The effects may be physiological and biochemical without physical changes in the neuron. Within the hypothalamus there are a number of collections of neurons called nuclei. The arcuate nucleus is consistently the most sensitive of these nuclei to MSG and aspartame toxicity. We know that this nucleus regulates growth hormone secretion, by way of the pituitary. But, what is less well appreciated is the fact that this nucleus has intimate connections to the other nuclei, such as the supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus. Indeed, when animals are given doses of MSG or aspartame, these nuclei are injured as well. Several studies have shown shrinkage of the pituitary, thyroid, adrenals and gonads in animals exposed to high concentrations of these excitotoxins. In addition, a consistent finding is gross obesity in animals exposed to these excitotoxins early in life. Some have raised the question concerning the connection between a high intake of food borne excitotoxins and the dramatic rise in childhood obesity over the past two decades. In animals made obese by damaging hypothalamic nuclei, one frequently sees accompanying violent outburst. We also know that directly injecting micromolar quantities of MSG into certain hypothalamic nuclei can precipitate an explosion of violence in experimental animals. The hypothalamus is one of the areas of the brain not protected by the blood- brain barrier. This is of special concern during childhood, since exposure to high intakes of excitotoxins, such as aspartame, can alter the development of the hypothalamus, leading to sexual maldevelopment and endocrine problems that will appear later in life. For example, we know that infant animals exposed to excitotoxins will have fewer offspring and the offspring will be smaller than normal. When the hypothalamus is exposed to excitotoxins early in life, the neural connections are often misdirected. Something I have called, mis-wiring of the brain. What this means is that a mis-wired hypothalamus will not react normally to the internal and external environmental cues that normally control our endocrine system. This could lead to infertility, hypothyroidism, adrenal hypoactivity, growth retardation and even emotional or intellectual problems later in life. All of these have been reported in studies using excitotoxin models. Many other problems have been traced to excitotoxin damage to the hypothalamus. For example, it is known that exposure of infants to high dose excitotoxins can result in immune system impairment throughout life. This would translate into more infections, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Recently, Trocho and co-workers discovered that the methanol in aspartame appears to attach to the DNA of cells after it is metabolized to formaldehyde, and is not only very difficult to remove, but results in numerous DNA deletion injuries. This could increase cancer risk as well as risk of other degenerative diseases, such as lupus, diabetes and Alzheimer?s disease. It is now known that glutamate ( and therefore aspartate) is the major neurotransmitter in the hypothalamus and therefore excess concentrations may affect all of the various nuclei in the hypothalamus. This means that virtually every function of the hypothalamus is vulnerable to excitotoxin damage, both subtle and acutely dramatic, depending on the dose. In normal everyday life we are exposed to numerous excitotoxins added to foods and drinks, in the form of MSG, cysteine and aspartame. Several studies have shown that these toxic doses are synergistic, that is, they are more than just the sum effect of each excitotoxin. Therefore, a meal of MSG laden soup, a diet cola and foods with hydrolyzed vegetable protein and natural flavoring, could easily damage the hypothalamus, as well as other portions of the nervous system. During pregnancy, the deleterious effects could be even more devastating, since it will affect the development of the brain itself. Another possibility, is the effect of excitotoxins on the sympathetic nervous system-controlling centers in the hypothalamus. Over stimulation could result in cardiac electrical abnormalities leading to sudden death. This has been demonstrated by hypothalalamic stimulation experiments. There have been clinical reports of cardiac related emergency room visits following a meal high in excitotoxin additives. Sudden deaths following such meals have also been reported. Since most hospitals rarely consider this in their differential diagnosis, we have no accurate data as to the number of ER visits and deaths related to this event. I suspect the numbers would be quite high. In conclusion, there is compelling evidence to indicate that food additive excitotoxins, such as aspartame, pose a serious danger to our well being, especially so in the case of children and the elderly. It has been demonstrated that excitotoxins in the diet can dramatically elevate free radical generation for prolonged periods of time and that once induced, it triggers a viscous cycle that ends in neuron death. Most authorities now agree that elevated free radical generation is associated with virtually all degenerative diseases as well as most injuries and toxins. It makes little sense to expose the general public to a product that we know increases free radical generation so dramatically and is associated with laboratory proven injuries to the nervous system. Russell L. Blaylock, M.D. Neurosurgeon 9 Lakeland Circle, Suite A Jackson, Ms 39216
  7. http://www.arthritistrust.org/Articles/Fungal-Mycotoxin%20Connection.pdf Top ten foods to avoid: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/11/05/toxic-foods.aspx Foods OK to eat to rid yourself of Fungi: http://knowthecause.com/Resources/tabid/56/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/184/categoryId/55/What-is-the-Phase-One-diet.aspx
  8. Come on Gracie, walking on dirt floors and milking cows sounds fun You would think that our ever changing environment would concern endocrinologist enough to be open to ALL possibilities!
  9. http://www.greenfacts.org/en/endocrine-dis...-disruptors.htm http://www.womentowomen.com/detoxification...disruptors.aspx The most common endocrine disruptor chemicals While we realize that the alphabet-and-number soup of all these chemicals can be quite confusing, even for those of us with a science background, we thought we would list some of the major offenders. Please feel free to skip this section if you prefer not to dwell on the negative. We include it because we believe information is power. * Bisphenol?A: A synthetic substance widely used to make polycarbonated plastics found in food and drink containers, the lining of tin cans, toys, baby bottles, dental sealants, flame retardants, and plastic wraps. This chemical easily leaches out into food and water. * Phthalates: Synthetic substances added to plastics to make them softer, more flexible and resilient. They also extend staying power. They are found in IV tubing, vinyl flooring, glues, inks, pesticides, detergents, plastic bags, food packaging, children?s toys, shower curtains, soaps, shampoos, perfumes, hair spray and nail polish. For more information, please refer to our article on holistic skincare. * Parabens: Compounds used as preservatives in thousands of cosmetic, food and pharmaceutical products. * PBDE?s (polybrominated diphenyl ethers): Found in flame retardants used on furniture, curtains, mattresses, carpets, television and computer castings. Categorized as a persistent organic pollutant (POP), this substance is stored in animal fats and thus found in dairy products, meat, fish, and human breast milk, and has been banned in several countries. It has also been detected in house dust. * PCB?s (polychlorinated biphenyls): Another group of highly toxic synthetic chemical compounds found on the list of POP?s, once used widely as insulation fluid in electrical transformers, lubricating oil in pipelines, and components of plastics and mixed with adhesives, paper, inks, paints and dyes. Since 1976 PCB?s have been banned in new products, but they are highly stable compounds that degrade very slowly, and these chemicals still persist. * Dioxin: Dioxin is a general name applied to a group of hundreds of chemicals that are highly persistent in the environment. The most toxic compound is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, or TCDD. Dioxin is formed as an unintentional by-product of many industrial processes involving chlorine such as waste incineration, chemical and pesticide manufacturing, and pulp and paper bleaching. Small molecules are diffused into the atmosphere, then land on soil, where they are eaten by soil microbes. From there they pass up the food chain into meat, fish, and dairy products and breast milk. We absorb 90% of the dioxin in our bodies through food sources, though you won?t find it listed on any label. Levels have been decreasing since the 1990?s with environmental measures, but it is still probably the most prevalent toxic chemical in our environment. * Pesticides and herbicides: In particular, atrazine, simazine, and heptachlor and other organophosphates and organochlorines have been found to be toxic to the nervous system and to show damaging reproductive (e.g., decreasing sperm motility) and developmental effects. * Heavy metals: Cadmium and arsenic are two heavy metals in widespread use whose endocrine disrupting mechanisms of action have been described. Mercury and lead are also implicated, and more studies are underway on heavy metals. Very interesting.
  10. Hope your post op is going well!!!

  11. Thank you again for the time you have taken with me.

    xoxo

  12. Makes me wonder as well. I had a progesterone only IUD and that is when my symptoms started but who knows. Could this be why more and more women are being diagnosied with Cushings? here is a short article: http://www.find-health-articles.com/rec_pu...-s-syndrome.htm
  13. http://www.drugs.com/sfx/medroxyprogestero...tml#system_6203 Medroxyprogesterone Side Effects Brand Names: Provera, Depo-Provera, depo-subQ provera 104, Depo-SubQ Provera 104 Please note - some side effects for Medroxyprogesterone may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). Ads by Google SEROQUEL ? Facts (quetiapine fumarate) Get The Facts And See Prescribing Information www.SEROQUELFACTS.com Side Effects Research Side Effects. Understand Side Effects Better! OnlineWide.com/Side-Effects For the consumer Medroxyprogesterone Medroxyprogesterone Injectable Suspension Medroxyprogesterone Injectable Suspension (subcutaneous) For the professional Medroxyprogesterone By body system Endocrine side effects Metabolic side effects Genitourinary side effects Oncologic side effects Cardiovascular side effects Musculoskeletal side effects Dermatologic side effects Nervous system side effects Gastrointestinal side effects Hepatic side effects Hematologic side effects Hypersensitivity side effects Local side effects Ocular side effects Psychiatric side effects Side Effects of Medroxyprogesterone - for the consumer Medroxyprogesterone All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome when using Medroxyprogesterone: Acne; changes in menstrual flow, including breakthrough bleeding, spotting, or missed periods; dizziness; drowsiness; fever; headache; hot flashes; nausea; nervousness; pain; rash; sleeplessness; stomach pain; weakness; weight gain or loss. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Medroxyprogesterone: Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); chest pain; depression; lumps in the breast or under the armpits; partial or complete loss of vision or changes in vision; shortness of breath; slurred speech; sudden loss of coordination; sudden or severe headache; swelling of fingers or ankles; tenderness, pain, or swelling of the calf; weakness, numbness, or pain in the arms or legs; yellowing of the skin or eyes. Medroxyprogesterone Injectable Suspension All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome when using Medroxyprogesterone Injectable Suspension: Acne; dizziness; drowsiness; fever; headache; hot flashes; nausea; nervousness; pain, redness, and swelling at injection site; sleeplessness; weakness. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Medroxyprogesterone Injectable Suspension: Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); blood clots; changes in menstrual flow, including breakthrough bleeding, spotting, or missed periods; chest pain; mental or mood changes; partial or complete loss of vision or changes in vision; severe dizziness or fainting; severe stomach pain; shortness of breath; slurred speech; sudden loss of coordination; sudden or severe headache or vomiting; swelling of fingers or ankles; unusual weight gain or loss; weakness, numbness, or pain in the arms or legs; yellowing of the skin or eyes. Medroxyprogesterone Injectable Suspension (subcutaneous) All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome when using Medroxyprogesterone Injectable Suspension (subcutaneous): Acne; changes in menstrual flow, including breakthrough bleeding, spotting, or missed periods; dizziness; drowsiness; fever; headache; hot flashes; nausea; nervousness; pain; rash; sleeplessness; stomach pain; weakness; weight gain or loss. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Medroxyprogesterone Injectable Suspension (subcutaneous): Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); blood clots; chest pain; depression; partial or complete loss of vision or changes in vision; shortness of breath; slurred speech; sudden loss of coordination; sudden or severe headache; swelling of fingers or ankles; weakness, numbness, or pain in the arms or legs; yellowing of the skin or eyes. Top For the professional Medroxyprogesterone See BOXED WARNINGS, WARNINGS, and PRECAUTIONS. Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. The following adverse reactions have been reported in women taking progestins, including Medroxyprogesterone acetate tablets, without concomitant estrogens treatment: 1. Genitourinary System Abnormal uterine bleeding (irregular, increase, decrease), change in menstrual flow, breakthrough bleeding, spotting, amenorrhea, changes in cervical erosion and cervical secretions. 2. Breasts Breast tenderness, mastodynia or galactorrhea has been reported. 3. Cardiovascular Thromboembolic disorders including thrombophlebitis and pulmonary embolism have been reported. 4. Gastrointestinal Nausea, cholestatic jaundice. 5. Skin Sensitivity reactions consisting of urticaria, pruritus, edema and generalized rash have occurred. Acne, alopecia and hirsutism have been reported. 6. Eyes Neuro-ocular lesions, for example, retinal thrombosis, and optic neuritis. 7. Central Nervous System Mental depression, insomnia, somnolence, dizziness, headache, nervousness. 8. Miscellaneous Hypersensitivity reactions (for example, anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions, angioedema), rash (allergic) with and without pruritus, change in weight (increase or decrease), pyrexia, edema/fluid retention, fatigue, decreased glucose tolerance. The following additional adverse reactions have been reported with estrogen and/or progestin therapy. 1. Genitourinary System Abnormal uterine bleeding/spotting, or flow; breakthrough bleeding; spotting; dysmenorrheal/pelvic pain; increase in size of uterine leiomyomata; vaginitis, including vaginal candidiasis; change in amount of cervical secretion; changes in cervical ectropion; ovarian cancer; endometrial hyperplasia; endometrial cancer. 2. Breasts Tenderness, enlargement, pain, nipple discharge, galactorrhea; fibrocystic breast changes; breast cancer. 3. Cardiovascular Deep and superficial venous thrombosis; pulmonary embolism; thrombophlebitis; myocardial infarction; stroke; increase in blood pressure. 4. Gastrointestinal Nausea, vomiting; abdominal cramps, bloating; cholestatic jaundice; increased incidence of gallbladder disease; pancreatitis; enlargement of hepatic hemangiomas. 5. Skin Chloasma or melasma that may persist when drug is discontinued; erythema multiforme; erythema nodosum; hemorrhagic eruption; loss of scalp hair; hirsutism; pruritus, rash. 6. Eyes Retinal vascular thrombosis, intolerance to contact lenses. 7. Central Nervous System Headache; migraine; dizziness; mental depression; chorea; nervousness; mood disturbances; irritability; exacerbation of epilepsy, dementia. 8. Miscellaneous Increase or decrease in weight; reduced carbohydrate tolerance; aggravation of porphyria; edema; arthalgias; leg cramps; changes in libido; urticaria, angioedema, anaphylactoid/anaplylactic reactions; hypocalcemia; exacerbation of asthma; increased triglycerides. Top By body system Endocrine side effects Cushing's syndrome is uncommon and appears to be associated with a long duration of therapy and moderate to high doses of medroxyprogesterone. Doses used for hormonal replacement therapy and for long-term contraception are not associated with Cushing's syndrome. Medroxyprogesterone has mild glucocorticoid activity. In cases of medroxyprogesterone-induced Cushing's syndrome, low cortisol and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) levels with a reduced pituitary-adrenal reserve have been documented. Acute adrenal insufficiency may ensue following withdrawal of medroxyprogesterone. Endocrine side effects have included breast tenderness, galactorrhea with or without hyperprolactinemia, prevention of lactation, hirsutism, and Cushing's syndrome.
  14. I haven't seen your smiling face around. Just curious how you are doing after your surgery?

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