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Found 8 results

  1. Written by Kathleen Doheny with Maria Fleseriu, MD, FACE, and Vivien Herman-Bonert, MD Cushing's disease, an uncommon but hard to treat endocrine disorder, occurs when a tumor on the pituitary gland, called an adenoma—that is almost always benign—leads to an overproduction of ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone), which is responsible for stimulating the release of cortisol, also known as the stress hormone. Until now, surgery to remove the non-cancerous but problematic tumor has been the only effective treatment. Still, many patients will require medication to help control their serum cortisol levels, and others cannot have surgery or would prefer to avoid it. Finally, a drug proves effective as added on or alternative to surgery in managing Cushing's disease. Photo; 123rf New Drug Offers Alternative to Surgery for Cushing's Disease Now, there is good news about long-term positive results achieved with pasireotide (Signifor)—the first medication to demonstrate effectiveness in both normalizing serum cortisol levels and either shrinking or slowing growth of tumors over the long term.1,2 These findings appear in the journal, Clinical Endocrinology, showing that patients followed for 36 months as part of an ongoing study had improved patient outcomes for Cushing’s disease.2 "What we knew before this extension study was—the drug will work in approximately half of the patients with mild Cushing's disease," says study author Maria Fleseriu, MD, FACE, director of the Northwest Pituitary Center and professor of neurological surgery and medicine in the division of endocrinology, diabetes and clinical nutrition at the Oregon Health and Sciences University School of Medicine. “Pasireotide also offers good clinical benefits," says Dr. Fleseriu who is also the president of the Pituitary Society, “which includes improvements in blood pressure, other signs and symptoms of Cushing’s symptom], and quality of life.”2 What Symptoms Are Helped by Drug for Cushing's Disease? Among the signs and symptoms of Cushing’s disease that are lessened with treatment are:3 Changes in physical appearance such as wide, purple stretch marks on the skin (eg, chest, armpits, abdomen, thighs) Rapid and unexplained weight gain A more full, rounder face Protruding abdomen from fat deposits Increased fat deposits around the neck area The accumulation of adipose tissue raises the risk of heart disease, which adds to the urgency of effective treatment. In addition, many individuals who have Cushing’s disease also complain of quality of life issues such as fatigue, depression, mood and behavioral problems, as well as poor memory.2 As good as the results appear following the longer term use of pasireotide,2 Dr. Fleseriu admits that in any extension study in which patients are asked to continue on, there are some built-in limitations, which may influence the findings. For example, patients who agree to stay on do so because they are good responders, meaning they feel better, so they’re happy to stick with the study. “Fortunately, for the patients who have responded to pasireotide initially, this is a drug that can be continued as there are no new safety signals with longer use," Dr. Fleseriu tells EndocrineWeb, "and when the response at the start is good, very few patients will lose control of their urinary free cortisol over time. That's a frequent marker used to monitor patient's status. For those patients with large tumors, almost half of them had a significant shrinkage, and all the others had a stable tumor size." What Are the Reasons to Consider Drug Treatment to Manage Cushing’s Symptoms The extension study ''was important because we didn't have any long-term data regarding patient response to this once-a-month treatment to manage Cushing's disease," she says. While selective surgical removal of the tumor is the preferred treatment choice, the success rate in patients varies, and Cushing's symptoms persist in up to 35% of patients after surgery. In addition, recurrent rates (ie, return of disease) range from 13% to 66% after individuals experience different durations remaining in remission.1 Therefore, the availability of an effective, long-lasting drug will change the course of therapy for many patients with Cushing’s disease going forward. Not only will pasireotide benefit patients who have persistent and recurrent disease after undergoing surgery, but also this medication will be beneficial for those who are not candidates for surgery or just wish to avoid having this procedure, he said. Examining the Safety and Tolerability of Pasireotide This long-acting therapy, pasireotide, which is given by injection, was approved in the US after reviewing results of a 12-month Phase 3 trial.1 In the initial study, participants had a confirmed pituitary cause of the Cushing's disease. After that, the researchers added the optional 12-month open-label, extension study, and now patients can continue on in a separate long-term safety study. Those eligible for the 12-month extension had to have mean urinary free cortisol not exceeding the upper limit of normal (166.5 nanomoles per 24 hour) and/or be considered by the investigator to be getting substantial clinical benefit from treatment with long-action pasireotide, and to demonstrate tolerability of pasireotide during the core study.1 Of the 150 in the initial trial, 81 participants, or 54% of the patients, entered the extension study. Of those, 39 completed the next phase, and most also enrolled in another long-term safety study—these results not yet available).2 During the core study, 1 participants were randomly assigned to 10 or 30 mg of the drug every 28 days, with doses based on effectiveness and tolerability. When they entered the extension, patients were given the same dose they received at month.1,2 Study Outcomes Offer Advantages in Cushing’s Disease Of those who received 36 months of treatment with pasireotide, nearly three in four (72.2%) had controlled levels of urinary free cortisol at this time point.2 Equally good news for this drug was that tumors either shrank or did not grow. Of those individuals who started the trial with a measurable tumor (adenoma) as well as those with an adenoma at the two year mark (35 people), 85.7% of them experienced a reduction of 20% or more or less than a 20% change in tumor volume. No macroadenomas present at the start of the study showed a change of more than 20% at either month 24 or 36.2 Improvements in blood pressure, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference continued throughout the extension study.1 Those factors influence CVD risk, the leading cause of death in those with Cushing's.4 As for adverse events, most of the study participants, 91.4%, did report one or more complaint during the extension study—most commonly, it was high blood sugar, which was reported by nearly 40% of participants.2. This is not surprising when you consider that most (81.5%) of the individuals participating in the extension trial entered with a diagnosis of diabetes or use of antidiabetic medication, and even more of them (88.9%) had diabetes at the last evaluation.1 This complication indicates the need for people with Cushing’s disease to check their blood glucose, as appropriate. Do You Have Cushing’s Disese? Here's What You Need to Know Women typically develop Cushing’s disease more often than men. What else should you be aware of if you and your doctor decide this medication will help you? Monitoring is crucial, says Dr. Fleseriu, as you will need to have your cortisol levels checked, and you should be on alert for any diabetes signals, which will require close monitoring and regular follow-up for disease management. Another understanding gained from the results of this drug study: "This medication works on the tumor level," she says. "If the patient has a macroadenoma (large tumor), this would be the preferred treatment." However, it should be used with caution in those with diabetes given the increased risk of experiencing high blood sugar. The researchers conclude that "the long-term safety profile of pasireotide was very favorable and consistent with that reported during the first 12 months of treatment. These data support the use of long-acting pasireotide as an effective long-term treatment option for some patients with Cushing's Disease."1 Understanding Benefits of New Drug to Treat Cushing's Diseease Vivien S. Herman-Bonert, MD, an endocrinologist and clinical director of the Pituitary Center at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, agreed to discuss the study findings, after agreeing to review the research for EndocrineWeb. As to who might benefit most from monthly pasireotide injections? Dr. Herman-Bonert says, "any patient with Cushing's disease that requires long-term medical therapy, which includes patients with persistent or recurrent disease after surgery." Certainly, anyone who has had poor response to any other medical therapies for Cushing's disease either because they didn't work well enough or because the side effects were too much, will likely benefit a well, she adds. Among the pluses that came out of the study, she says, is that nearly half of the patients had controlled average urinary free cortisol levels after two full years, and 72% of the participants who continued on with the drug for 36 months were able to remain in good urinary cortisol control .1 As the authors stated, tumor shrinkage was another clear benefit of taking long-term pasireotide. That makes the drug a potentially good choice for those even with large tumors or with progressive tumor growth, she says. It’s always good for anyone with Cushing’s disease to have an alterative to surgery, or a back-up option when surgery isn’t quite enough, says Dr. Herman-Bonert. The best news for patients is that quality of life scores improved,1 she adds. Dr Herman-Bonert did add a note of caution: Although the treatment in this study is described as ''long-term, patients will need to be on this for far longer than 2 to 3 years," she says. So, the data reported in this study may or may not persist, and we don’t yet know what the impact will be 10 or 25 years out. Also, the issue of hyperglycemia-related adverse events raises a concern, given the vast majority (81%) of patients who have both Cushing’s disease and diabetes. Most of those taking this drug had a dual diagnosis—having diabetes, a history of diabetes, or taking antidiabetic medicine. If you are under care for diabetes and you require treatment for Cushing’s disease, you must be ver mindful that taking pasireotide will likely lead to high blood sugar spikes, so you should plan to address this with your healthcare provider. Dr. Fleseriu reports research support paid to Oregon Health & Science University from Novartis and other 0companies and consultancy fees from Novartis and Strongbridge Biopharma. Dr. Herman-Bonert has no relevant disclosures. The study was underwritten by Novartis Pharma AG, the drug maker. From https://www.endocrineweb.com/news/pituitary-disorders/62449-cushings-disease-monthly-injection-good-alternative-surgery
  2. For patients with persistent or recurring Cushing’s disease, monthly pasireotide therapy was safe and effective, leading to normal urinary free cortisol levels in 47% of patients after 2 years, according to findings published in Clinical Endocrinology. Maria Fleseriu “The management of Cushing’s syndrome, and particularly Cushing’s disease, remains challenging,” Maria Fleseriu, MD, FACE, professor of neurological surgery and professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology, diabetes and clinical nutrition in the School of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University and director of the OHSU Northwest Pituitary Center, told Endocrine Today. “Long-acting pasireotide provided sustained biochemical improvements and clinical benefit in a significant proportion of patients with Cushing’s disease who elected to continue in this extension study. There were many adverse events reported overall, but no new safety signals emerging over long-term treatment.” In the last decade, medical treatment for Cushing’s disease has progressed from a few steroidogenesis inhibitors to three novel drug groups: new inhibitors for steroidogenic enzymes with possibly fewer adverse effects, pituitary-directed drugs that aim to inhibit the pathophysiological pathways of Cushing’s disease, and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists that block cortisol’s action, Fleseriu, who is also an Endocrine Today Editorial Board member, said. In an open-label extension study, Fleseriu and colleagues analyzed data from 81 adults with confirmed Cushing’s disease with mean urinary free cortisol not exceeding the upper limit of normal, who transitioned from a 12-month, randomized controlled trial where they were assigned 10 mg or 30 mg once-monthly intramuscular pasireotide (Signifor LAR, Novartis). During the main study, researchers recruited participants with mean urinary free cortisol level concentration 1.5 to five times the upper limit of normal, normal or greater than normal plasma and confirmed pituitary source of Cushing’s disease. Participants who elected to continue in the extension were considered biochemical responders or benefited from the study drug per the clinical investigator, Fleseriu said. “As in all extension studies, the bias is inherent that patients deemed responders tend to continue, but for any type of treatment for pituitary tumors, and particularly Cushing’s disease, long-term, robust data on efficacy and safety parameters is essential,” Fleseriu said. Median overall exposure to pasireotide at the end of the extension study was 23.9 months, with nearly half of patients receiving at least 1 year of treatment during the extension phase. Researchers found that improvements in clinical signs of hypercortisolism were sustained throughout the study and median urinary free cortisol remained within normal range. Overall, 38 participants (47%) had controlled urinary free cortisol at month 24 (after 12 months of treatment during the extension phase), with researchers noting that the proportion of participants with controlled or partially controlled urinary free cortisol was stable throughout the extension phase. “Interestingly, the median salivary cortisol level decreased but remained above normal (1.3 times upper limit of normal) at 3 years,” Fleseriu said. As seen in other pasireotide studies, and expected based on the mechanism of action, researchers observed hyperglycemia-related adverse events in 39.5% of participants, with diabetes medications initiated or escalated in some patients, Fleseriu said. However, mean fasting glucose and HbA1c were stable during the extension phase, after increasing in the main study. Within the cohort, 81.5% had type 2 diabetes at baseline (entering extension phase) and 88.9% patients had type 2 diabetes at last assessment. “Pasireotide acts at the tumor level, and tumor shrinkage is seen in many patients,” Fleseriu said. “In this study, 42% and 32.1% had a measurable microadenoma or macroadenoma, respectively, on MRI at the start of pasireotide treatment; an adenoma was not visible in almost a quarter of patients at 2 years.” Among patients with a measurable adenoma at baseline and at month 24 (n = 35), 85.7% experienced a reduction of at least 20% or a 20% change in tumor volume between the two time points. Improvements in median systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI and waist circumference were sustained during the extension, Fleseriu said. “The long-term safety profile of pasireotide was favorable and consistent with that reported during the first 12 months of treatment,” the researchers wrote. “These data support the use of long-acting pasireotide as an effective long-term treatment option for some patients with [Cushing’s disease].” Fleseriu said individualized treatment selecting patients who will derive benefit from therapy will be crucial, balancing both efficacy and the potential risks and costs. – by Regina Schaffer Disclosures: Fleseriu reports she has received consultant fees and her institution has received research support from Novo Nordisk and Pfizer. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures. From https://www.healio.com/endocrinology/neuroendocrinology/news/online/%7B5da4611f-34b2-4306-80b8-46babd2aad4a%7D/long-acting-pasireotide-provides-sustained-biochemical-improvements-in-cushings-disease?page=2
  3. LOS ANGELES — More than a century has passed since the neurosurgeon and pathologist Harvey Cushing first discovered the disease that would eventually bear his name, but only recently have several key discoveries offered patients with the condition real hope for a cure, according to a speaker here. There are several challenges clinicians confront in the diagnosis and treatment of Cushing’s disease, Shlomo Melmed, MB, ChB, FRCP, MACP, dean, executive vice president and professor of medicine at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said during a plenary presentation. Patients who present with Cushing’s disease typically have depression, impaired mental function and hypertension and are at high risk for stroke, myocardial infarction, thrombosis, dyslipidemia and other metabolic disorders, Melmed said. Available therapies, which range from surgery and radiation to the somatostatin analogue pasireotide (Signifor LAR, Novartis), are often followed by disease recurrence. Cushing’s disease is fatal without treatment; the median survival if uncontrolled is about 4.5 years, Melmed said. “This truly is a metabolic, malignant disorder,” Melmed said. “The life expectancy today in patients who are not controlled is apparently no different from 1930.” The outlook for Cushing’s disease is now beginning to change, Melmed said. New targets are emerging for treatment, and newly discovered molecules show promise in reducing the secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and pituitary tumor size. “Now, we are seeing the glimmers of opportunity and optimism, that we can identify specific tumor drivers — SST5, [epidermal growth factor] receptor, cyclin inhibitors — and we can start thinking about personalized, precision treatment for these patients with a higher degree of efficacy and optimism than we could have even a year or 2 ago,” Melmed said. “This will be an opportunity for us to broaden the horizons of our investigations into this debilitating disorder.” Challenges in diagnosis, treatment Overall, about 10% of the U.S. population harbors a pituitary adenoma, the most common type of pituitary disorder, although the average size is only about 6 mm and 40% of them are not visible, Melmed said. In patients with Cushing’s disease, surgery is effective in only about 60% to 70% of patients for initial remission, and overall, there is about a 60% chance of recurrence depending on the surgery center, Melmed said. Radiation typically leads to hypopituitarism, whereas surgical or biochemical adrenalectomy is associated with adverse effects and morbidity. Additionally, the clinical features of hypercortisolemia overlap with many common illnesses, such as obesity, hypertension and type 2 diabetes. “There are thousands of those patients for every patient with Cushing’s disease who we will encounter,” Melmed said. The challenge for the treating clinician, Melmed said, is to normalize cortisol and ACTH with minimal morbidity, to resect the tumor mass or control tumor growth, preserve pituitary function, improve quality of life and achieve long-term control without recurrence. “This is a difficult challenge to meet for all of us,” Melmed said. Available options Pituitary surgery is typically the first-line option offered to patients with Cushing’s disease, Melmed said, and there are several advantages, including rapid initial remission, a one-time cost and potentially curing the disease. However, there are several disadvantages with surgery; patients undergoing surgery are at risk for postoperative venous thromboembolism, persistent hypersecretion of ACTH, adenoma persistence or recurrence, and surgical complications. Second-line options are repeat surgery, radiation, adrenalectomy or medical therapy, each with its own sets of pros and cons, Melmed said. “The reality of Cushing’s disease — these patients undergo first surgery and then recur, second surgery and then recur, then maybe radiation and then recur, and then they develop a chronic illness, and this chronic illness is what leads to their demise,” Melmed said. “Medical therapy is appropriate at every step of the spectrum.” Zebrafish clues Searching for new options, Melmed and colleagues introduced a pituitary tumor transforming gene discovered in his lab into zebrafish, which caused the fish to develop the hallmark features of Cushing’s disease: high cortisol levels, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In the fish models, researchers observed that cyclin E activity, which drives the production of ACTH, was high. Melmed and colleagues then screened zebrafish larvae in a search for cyclin E inhibitors to derive a therapeutic molecule and discovered R-roscovitine, shown to repress the expression of proopiomelanocortin (POMC), the pituitary precursor of ACTH. In fish, mouse and in vitro human cell models, treatment with R-roscovitine was associated with suppressed corticotroph tumor signaling and blocked ACTH production, Melmed said. “Furthermore, we asked whether or not roscovitine would actually block transcription of the POMC gene,” Melmed said. “It does. We had this molecule (that) suppressed cyclin E and also blocks transcription of POMC leading to blocked production of ACTH.” In a small, open-label, proof-of-principal study, four patients with Cushing’s disease who received roscovitine for 4 weeks developed normalized urinary free cortisol, Melmed said. Currently, the FDA Office of Orphan Products Development is funding a multicenter, phase 2, open-label clinical trial that will evaluate the safety and efficacy of two of three potential doses of oral roscovitine (seliciclib) in patients with newly diagnosed, persistent or recurrent Cushing disease. Up to 29 participants will be treated with up to 800 mg per day of oral seliciclib for 4 days each week for 4 weeks and enrolled in sequential cohorts based on efficacy outcomes. “Given the rarity of the disorder, it will probably take us 2 to 3 years to recruit patients to give us a robust answer,” Melmed said. “This zebrafish model was published in 2011, and we are now in 2019. It has taken us 8 years from publication of the data to, today, going into humans with Cushing’s. Hopefully, this will light the pathway for a phase 2 trial.” ‘ Offering optimism’ Practitioners face a unique paradigm when treating patients with Cushing’s disease, Melmed said. Available first- and second-line therapy options often are not a cure for many patients, who develop multimorbidity and report a low quality of life. “Then, we are kept in this difficult cycle of what to do next and, eventually, running out of options,” Melmed said. “Now, we can look at novel, targeted molecules and add those to our armamentarium and at least offer our patients the opportunity to participate in trials, or at least offer the optimism that, over the coming years, there will be a light at the end of the tunnel for their disorder.” Melmed compared the work to Lucas Cranach’s Fons Juventutis (The Fountain of Youth). The painting, completed in 1446, shows sick people brought by horse-drawn ambulance to a pool of water, only to emerge happy and healthy. “He was imagining this ‘elixir of youth’ (that) we could offer patients who are very ill and, in fact, that is what we as endocrinologists do,” Melmed said. “We offer our patients these elixirs. These Cushing’s patients are extremely ill. We are trying with all of our molecular work and our understanding of pathogenesis and signaling to create this pool of water for them, where they can emerge with at least an improved quality of life and, hopefully, a normalized mortality. That is our challenge.” – by Regina Schaffer Reference: Melmed S. From zebrafish to humans: translating discoveries for the treatment of Cushing’s disease. Presented at: AACE Annual Scientific and Clinical Congress; April 24-28, 2019; Los Angeles. Disclosure: Melmed reports no relevant financial disclosures. From https://www.healio.com/endocrinology/neuroendocrinology/news/online/%7B585002ad-640f-49e5-8d62-d1853154d7e2%7D/new-discoveries-offer-possible-cushings-disease-cure
  4. The chemotherapy temozolomide partially improved a case of an aggressive pituitary tumor that caused symptoms of Cushing’s disease (CD), according to a new study in Poland. However, after tumor mass and cortisol levels were stabilized for a few months, the patient experienced rapid progression, suggesting that new methods for extending the effects of temozolomide are needed. The study, “Temozolomide therapy for aggressive pituitary Crooke’s cells corticotropinoma causing Cushing’s Disease: A case report with literature review,” appeared in the journal Endokrynologia Polska. Aggressive pituitary tumors are usually invasive macroadenomas, or benign tumors larger than 10 mm. A very rare subset of pituitary adenoma — particularly corticotropinoma, or tumors with excessive secretion of corticotropin (ACTH) — exhibit Crooke’s cells. These tumors are highly invasive, have a high recurrence rate, and are often resistant to treatment. Information is not widely available about the effectiveness of treating aggressive pituitary tumors, particularly those that cause Cushing’s disease. The management of these tumors usually requires neurosurgery, followed by radiotherapy, and pharmacotherapy. However, the chemotherapy medication temozolomide has been increasingly used as a first-line treatment after initial evidence of its effectiveness in treating glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer. In this study, researchers at the Jagiellonian University, in Poland, discussed the case of a 61-year-old man with ACTH-dependent Cushing’s syndrome caused by Crooke’s cell corticotropinoma. The patient first presented with symptoms of severe hypercorticoidism — the excessive secretion of steroid hormones from the adrenal cortex — in December 2011. He also showed advanced heart failure, severe headaches, and impaired vision, which had started two or three years before diagnosis. Examinations revealed osteoporosis and a fracture in the Th5 vertebra. His morning ACTH levels were high. The same was observed for mean cortisol levels even after dexamethasone treatment, which was suggestive of a pituitary tumor secreting ACTH. MRIs showed the existence of a tumor mass, later identified as a macroadenoma with high cell polymorphism, the presence of Crooke’s cells, and ACTH secretion. The patient was referred for transsphenoidal nonradical neurosurgery, performed through the nose and the sphenoid sinus, and bilateral adrenalectomy, or the surgical removal of the adrenal glands, in 2012-2013. However, he developed fast, postoperative recurrence of hypercorticoidism and tumor regrowth. This led to three additional transsphenoidal neurosurgeries and radiotherapy. The patient’s clinical status worsened as he developed severe cardiac insufficiency. Doctors began temozolomide treatment in April 2015, which did not result in adverse effects throughout treatment. The initial standard dose (150–200 mg/m2) was given once daily in the morning for five consecutive days, in a 28-day cycle. The patient also received 600 mg of ketoconazole, an antifungal medication. Ondansetron was administered to prevent nausea and vomiting. Subsequent examinations revealed clinical and biochemical improvements, including a reduction in ACTH and cortisol levels. In addition, the patient also showed reduced cardiac insufficiency, less frequent and less severe headaches, visual field improvements, and better physical fitness and mood. However, clinical symptoms worsened after the eighth temozolomide cycle. The tumor size also suddenly increased after the ninth cycle, reaching the inner ear. Temozolomide was then discontinued and ACTH levels increased by 28 percent one month later. The patient also demonstrated deteriorated vision, hearing loss, and strong headaches. Clinicians then decided to start treatment with the Cushing’s disease therapy Signifor (pasireotide), but a worsening of diabetes was observed, and the patient died in February 2016. “The most probable reason for death was compression of the brainstem, which had been observed in the last MRI of the pituitary,” the researchers wrote, adding that “due to the very short duration of treatment, any conclusions on the treatment with Signifor cannot be drawn.” Overall, “the results of the presented case suggest that [temozolomide] treatment monotherapy could have only partial response in aggressive corticotroph adenoma causing Cushing’s disease, followed by sudden progression,” the investigators wrote. This contrasts with mostly responsive cases reported in research literature, they noted. “Therefore, further research on the factors of responsiveness and on novel methods to extend the duration of the effect of [temozolomide] should be carried out,” they wrote. From https://cushieblog.com/2018/02/10/temozolomide-may-partially-improve-aggressive-pituitary-tumors-causing-cushings-disease/
  5. November 7, 2012 The US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee (EMDAC) voted unanimously in support of the use of Signifor® (pasireotide) for the treatment of patients with Cushing's disease who require medical therapeutic intervention. The recommendation was based on data from clinical trials of pasireotide, including PASPORT-CUSHINGS (PASireotide clinical trial PORTfolio - CUSHING'S disease), the largest randomized Phase III study to evaluate a medical therapy in patients with Cushing's disease. Patient Assistance for SIGNIFOR support for patients includes: - Therapy-specific support programs for out-of-pocket costs - Alternative assistance searches and referrals to Federal and State assistance programs - Referrals to Independent Charitable Foundations for assistance with co-pay costs - Patient assistance for low-income and uninsured patients For more information, or to speak to a Patient Assistance NOW Endocrinology representative, please call 1-877-503-3377 (select option #3 for SIGNIFOR) Monday to Friday 8 am - 8 pm ET.
  6. Basel Monday, December 17, 2012, 16:00 Hrs [iST] The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Novartis' Signifor (pasireotide) injection for the treatment of adult patients with Cushing's disease for whom pituitary surgery is not an option or has not been curative. Signifor is the first medicine to be approved in the US that addresses the underlying mechanism of Cushing's disease, a serious, debilitating endocrine disorder caused by the presence of a non-cancerous pituitary tumour which ultimately leads to excess cortisol in the body. This approval follows a unanimous recommendation from the FDA Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee (EMDAC) in support of the use of Signifor. "The FDA approval of Signifor for Cushing's disease brings a novel pituitary-directed therapy to patients with limited treatment options," said Hervé Hoppenot, president, Novartis Oncology. "Today's milestone reinforces Novartis' commitment to addressing unmet needs and advancing treatments for rare pituitary-related disorders." Cushing's disease most commonly affects adults as young as 20 to 50 years and affects women three times more often than men. It may present with weight gain, central obesity, a round, red full face, severe fatigue and weakness, striae (purple stretch marks), high blood pressure, depression and anxiety. Cushing's disease can cause severe illness and death with mortality up to four times higher than in the healthy population. The approval is based on data from PASPORT-CUSHINGS (PASireotide clinical trial PORTfolio - CUSHING'S disease), the largest randomized Phase III study to evaluate a medical therapy in patients with Cushing's disease. Results from the PASPORT-CUSHINGS study found that a decrease in mean urinary-free cortisol (UFC), the key measure of biochemical control of the disease, was sustained during the treatment period in most patients with a subset of patients reaching normal levels. The study also showed that certain clinical manifestations of Cushing's disease tended to improve. "Patients with Cushing's disease may suffer from debilitating manifestations, and there are many serious health complications associated with the disease," said Mary Andrews, CEO and Co-Founder of the US non-profit, The MAGIC Foundation. "The FDA approval of Signifor offers the option of a medical therapy that may help certain patients with Cushing's disease." In April 2012, the European Commission approved Signiforfor the treatment of adult patients with Cushing's disease for whom surgery is not an option or for whom surgery has failed. Other worldwide regulatory filings for pasireotide for this use are also underway. Signifor (pasireotide) is approved in the US for the treatment of adult patients with Cushing's disease for whom pituitary surgery is not an option or has not been curative, and in the European Union for the treatment of adult patients with Cushing's disease for whom surgery is not an option or for whom surgery has failed. For the treatment of Cushing's disease, Signifor has been studied as a twice-daily subcutaneous (sc) injection and is currently being evaluated as a long-acting release (LAR), once-monthly intramuscular (IM) injection as part of a global Phase III program in Cushing's disease and acromegaly. Signifor is a multireceptor targeting somatostatin analog that binds with high affinity to four of the five somatostatin receptor subtypes (sst 1, 2, 3 and 5). From http://pharmabiz.com/NewsDetails.aspx?aid=72752&sid=2
  7. Committee votes unanimously in favor of Signifor (pasireotide) as the first medication to treat US patients with Cushing's disease Pasireotide represents the first targeted approach for this potentially debilitating endocrine disorder caused by a pituitary tumor that triggers excess cortisol[1],[2] Majority of patients in the Phase III clinical trial experienced a rapid and sustained decrease in mean cortisol levels with subset of patients achieving normalization[3] Basel, November 7, 2012 - The US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee (EMDAC) has voted unanimously in support of the use of Signifor®(pasireotide) for the treatment of patients with Cushing's disease who require medical therapeutic intervention. "We are encouraged by today's favorable advisory committee recommendation for pasireotide in Cushing's disease and will work closely with the FDA as it completes its review of our application," said Hervé Hoppenot, President, Novartis Oncology. "There is a significant unmet medical need for Cushing's disease patients and Novartis is committed to providing the endocrinology community with a novel therapeutic approach for this rare and debilitating endocrine disorder." The recommendation was based on data from clinical trials of pasireotide, including PASPORT-CUSHINGS (PASireotide clinical trialPORTfolio - CUSHING'S disease), the largest randomized Phase III study to evaluate a medical therapy in patients with Cushing's disease. Although not obliged to follow the recommendation, the FDA can seek the advice of its advisory committees as it reviews and decides whether to approve treatments[1],[4]. Results from the PASPORT-CUSHINGS study found that mean urinary-free cortisol (UFC), the key measure of biochemical control of the disease, was rapidly decreased and sustained in a majority of patients, with a subset of patients reaching normalized levels. The study also showed that, on average, as UFC levels were reduced, clinical manifestations of Cushing's disease improved. The most frequently reported adverse events (AEs) (>10%) by investigators for pasireotide were diarrhea, nausea, hyperglycemia, cholelithiasis, abdominal pain, diabetes mellitus, injection site reactions, fatigue and increased glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), with most events being Grade 1-2. The safety profile of pasireotide was similar to that of other somatostatin analogs (SSA) with the exception of the greater degree of hyperglycemia[3]. Cushing's syndrome is an endocrine disorder caused by excessive cortisol, a vital hormone that regulates metabolism, maintains cardiovascular function and helps the body respond to stress. Cushing's disease is a form of Cushing's syndrome, in which excess cortisol production is triggered by an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma. It is a rare but serious disease that affects approximately one to two patients per million per year. Cushing's disease most commonly affects adults as young as 20 to 50 years and affects women three times more often than men. It may present with weight gain, central obesity, a round, red full face, severe fatigue and weakness, striae (purple stretch marks), high blood pressure, depression and anxiety. The first line and most common treatment approach for Cushing's disease is surgical removal of the tumor[1],[2],[5],[6],[7]. About pasireotide Pasireotide is a multireceptor targeting somatostatin analog (SSA) that binds with high affinity to four of the five somatostatin receptor subtypes (sst 1, 2, 3 and 5)[2]. In April 2012, the European Commission approved pasireotide under the brand name Signiforfor the treatment of adult patients with Cushing's disease for whom surgery is not an option or for whom surgery has failed. Other worldwide regulatory filings for pasireotide for this use are also underway. For the treatment of Cushing's disease, pasireotide has been studied as a twice-daily subcutaneous (sc) injection and is currently being evaluated as a long-acting release (LAR), once-monthly intramuscular (IM) injection as part of a global Phase III program in Cushing's disease and acromegaly[8],[9]. There is no guarantee that pasireotide will become commercially available anywhere else in the world. As an investigational compound, the safety and efficacy profile of pasireotide has not yet been established in all countries for the treatment of Cushing's disease or any other indications. Access to pasireotide outside of the approved indications has been carefully controlled and monitored in clinical trials designed to better understand the potential benefits and risks of the compound. Information about Novartis clinical trials for pasireotide can be obtained by healthcare professionals at www.pasporttrials.com. Disclaimer The foregoing release contains forward-looking statements that can be identified by terminology such as "recommended," "potentially," "encouraged," "will," "committed," "recommendation," "underway," "potential," or similar expressions, or by express or implied discussions regarding potential marketing approvals for Signifor or regarding potential future revenues from Signifor. You should not place undue reliance on these statements. Such forward-looking statements reflect the current views of management regarding future events, and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results with Signifor to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such statements. There can be no guarantee that Signifor will be approved for sale in any market, or at any particular time. Nor can there be any guarantee that Signifor will achieve any particular levels of revenue in the future. In particular, management's expectations regarding Signifor could be affected by, among other things, unexpected regulatory actions or delays or government regulation generally; unexpected clinical trial results, including unexpected new clinical data and unexpected additional analysis of existing clinical data; government, industry and general public pricing pressures; competition in general; unexpected manufacturing issues; the company's ability to obtain or maintain patent or other proprietary intellectual property protection; the impact that the foregoing factors could have on the values attributed to the Novartis Group's assets and liabilities as recorded in the Group's consolidated balance sheet, and other risks and factors referred to in Novartis AG's current Form 20-F on file with the US Securities and Exchange Commission. Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may vary materially from those anticipated, believed, estimated or expected. Novartis is providing the information in this press release as of this date and does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this press release as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.
  8. This study is currently recruiting participants. Verified August 2012 by Novartis First Received on June 14, 2011. Last Updated on August 23, 2012 History of Changes Sponsor: Novartis Pharmaceuticals Information provided by (Responsible Party): Novartis ( Novartis Pharmaceuticals ) ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01374906 Purpose This is a randomized, double-blind, multicenter, phase III study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of 2 dosing regiments of Pasireotide long acting release (LAR) in patients with Cushing's disease. Condition Intervention Phase Cushing's Disease Drug: SOM230 LAR 30 mg Drug: SOM230 LAR 10 mg Phase 3 Study Type: Interventional Study Design: Allocation: Randomized Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor) Primary Purpose: Treatment Official Title: A Randomized, Double-blind, Multicenter, Phase III Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Pasireotide LAR in Patients With Cushing's Disease Resource links provided by NLM: Genetics Home Reference related topics: Cushing disease MedlinePlus related topics: Cushing's SyndromeU.S. FDA Resources Further study details as provided by Novartis: Primary Outcome Measures: Proportion of responders in each of the two Pasireotide LAR (long acting release)regimens independently [ Time Frame: 7 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ] To assess the efficacy of two Pasireotide LAR (long acting release) regimens independently in patients with Cushing's disease after 7 months of treatment regardless of up titration at month 4. A responder is defined as a patient who attains Mean Urinary Free Cortisol (mUFC) ≤ 1.0 X Upper Limit of Normal (ULN) at month 7 regardless of dose-titration. Secondary Outcome Measures: Proportion of responders in each of the Pasireotide LAR (long acting release) 10 mg and 30 mg doses independently in patients with Cushing 's disease after 7 months of treatment who did not up titrate the doses of Pasireotide at month 4. [ Time Frame: 7 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ] A responder is defined as a patient who attains mUFC ≤1.0 X ULN and had not had a dose increase at Month 4. Change in mean urinary free cortisol from baseline at every month in the core and every 3 months in extension within the two Pasireotide LAR regimens [ Time Frame: 26 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ] Proportion of responders in the two Pasireotide LAR regimens at every month in the core and every 3 months in the extension phases [ Time Frame: 26 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ] Proportion of responders in the two Pasireotide LAR regimens as measured by controlled and partially controlled mUFC(mean urinary free cortisol) combined responders at every month in the core and every 3 months in the extension [ Time Frame: 26 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ] Controlled mUFC (mean urinary free cortisol)response of the two Pasireotide regimens by month 7 and 12 [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ] To evaluate the frequency of controlled mUFC response of the two Pasireotide regimens by month 7 and 12. Estimated Enrollment: 148 Study Start Date: November 2011 Estimated Study Completion Date: January 2016 Estimated Primary Completion Date: November 2015 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure) Arms Assigned Interventions Experimental: 10 mg LAR dose Drug: SOM230 LAR 10 mg starting does of SOM230 LAR 10 mg i.m. administered once every 28 days for 4 months, followed by dose up-titration or continuation of the starting dose. Experimental: 30 mg LAR dose Drug: SOM230 LAR 30 mg starting dose of 30 mg i.m. administered once every 28 days for 4 months, followed by dose up-titration or continuation of starting dose. [/url] Eligibility Ages Eligible for Study: 18 Years and older Genders Eligible for Study: Both Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No Criteria Inclusion Criteria: Karnofsky performance status ≥ 60 (i.e. requires occasional assistance, but is able to care for most of their personal needs) For patients on medical treatment for Cushing's disease the following washout periods must be completed before screening assessments are performed Inhibitors of steroidogenesis (ketoconazole, metyrapone): 1 week Pituitary directed agents: Dopamine agonists (bromocriptine, cabergoline) and PPARγ agonists (rosiglitazone or pioglitazone): 4 weeks Octreotide LAR, Lanreotide SR and Lanreotide autogel: 14 weeks Octreotide (immediate release formulation): 1 week Exclusion Criteria: Patients who are considered candidates for surgical treatment at the time of study entry Patients who have received pituitary irradiation within the last ten years prior to visit 1 Patients who have had any previous pasireotide treatment Patients who have been treated with mitotane during the last 6 months prior to Visit 1 Diabetic patients on antihyperglycemic medications with poor glycemic control as evidenced by HbA1c >8% Patients with risk factors for torsade de pointes, i.e. patients with a baseline QTcF >470 ms, hypokalemia, uncontrolled hypothyroidism, family history of long QT syndrome, or concomitant medications known to prolong QT interval Female patients who are pregnant or lactating, or are of childbearing potential (defined as all women physiologically capable of becoming pregnant) and not practicing an effective method of contraception/birth control. Sexually active males must use a condom during intercourse while taking the drug and for 2 months after the last dose of study drug and should not father a child in this period. A condom is required to be used also by vasectomized men in order to prevent delivery of the drug via seminal fluid Contacts and Locations Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01374906 Contacts Contact: Novartis Pharmaceuticals +1(800)340-6843 Show 73 Study Locations Sponsors and Collaborators Novartis Pharmaceuticals Investigators Study Director: Novartis Pharmaceuticals Novartis Pharmaceuticals More Information No publications provided Responsible Party: Novartis ( Novartis Pharmaceuticals ) ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01374906 History of Changes Other Study ID Numbers: CSOM230G2304 Study First Received: June 14, 2011 Last Updated: August 23, 2012 Health Authority: United States: Food and Drug Administration Netherlands: Medicines Evaluation Board (MEB) United Kingdom: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency Russia: Ministry of Health and Social Development of the Russian Federation Turkey: Ministry of Health China: State Food and Drug Administration Belgium: Federal Agency for Medicinal Products and Health Products Germany: Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices France: Afssaps - Agence française de sécurité sanitaire des produits de santé (Saint-Denis) Italy: The Italian Medicines Agency Spain: Spanish Agency of Medicines Canada: Ministry of Health & Long Term Care, Ontario Brazil: Ministry of Health Argentina: Administracion Nacional de Medicamentos, Alimentos y Tecnologia Medica Poland: Office for Registration of Medicinal Products, Medical Devices and Biocidal Products Thailand: Food and Drug Administration Japan: Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare Keywords provided by Novartis: Cushing's Disease Mean Urinary Free Cortisol Pasireotide Additional relevant MeSH terms: Cushing Syndrome Pituitary ACTH Hypersecretion Adrenocortical Hyperfunction Adrenal Gland Diseases Endocrine System Diseases Hyperpituitarism Pituitary Diseases Hypothalamic Diseases Brain Diseases Central Nervous System Diseases Nervous System Diseases ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 06, 2012 Locations United States, California UCLA/ University of California Los Angeles UCLA Tiverton Recruiting Los Angeles, California, United States, 90095 Contact: Brittany Sumerel 310-825-5874 bsumerel@mednet.ucla.edu Principal Investigator: Anthony P. Heaney United States, Maryland Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center/Johns Hopkins Med. Sidnney Kimmel J Hopkins Not yet recruiting Baltimore, Maryland, United States, 21231 Contact: Thomas Mitchell 410-502-0033 tmitche2@jhmi.edu Principal Investigator: Roberto Salvatori United States, Ohio Cleveland Clinic Foundation CCF - Euclid Loc Withdrawn Cleveland, Ohio, United States, 44195 United States, Oregon Oregon Health & Sciences University OHSU Withdrawn Portland, Oregon, United States, 97201 United States, Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania - Clinical Studies Unit Unniv SC Not yet recruiting Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, 19104 Contact: Kenneth Rockwell, Jr. 215-898-5664 rockwelk@mail.medd.upenn.edu Principal Investigator: Peter J. Snyder United States, Texas University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center UT southwest Withdrawn Dallas, Texas, United States, 75390-8527 United States, Washington Swedish Medical Center Swedish Terminated Seattle, Washington, United States United States, Wisconsin Medical College of Wisconsin MCW 2 Recruiting Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States, 53226 Contact: Gerard Coly 414-456-7468 gcoly@mcw.edu Principal Investigator: James W. Findling Argentina Novartis Investigative Site Withdrawn Capital Federal, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1425EKP Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Buenos Aires, Argentina, C1232AAC Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Cordoba, Argentina, X5009BSN Belgium Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Bruxelles, Belgium, 1200 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Bruxelles, Belgium, 1070 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Edegem, Belgium, 2650 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Gent, Belgium, 9000 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Jette, Belgium, 1090 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Leuven, Belgium, 3000 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Liège, Belgium, 4000 Brazil Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Fortaleza, CE, Brazil, 60020-181 Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil, 21941-913 Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, 90035-903 Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil, 14048-900 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting São Paulo, SP, Brazil, 05403 000 Canada, Nova Scotia Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, B3H 1V7 Canada, Quebec Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H2L 4M1 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada, J1N 5N4 France Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Besancon cedex, France, 25030 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Caen Cedex9, France, 14033 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Grenoble Cédex 9, France, 38043 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Le Kremlin Bicetre, France, 94275 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting LILLE Cedex, France, 59037 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Marseille cedex 05, France, 13385 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Paris, France, 75006 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Pessac Cedex, France, 33604 Germany Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Berlin, Germany, 10117 Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Erlangen, Germany, 91054 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Hamburg, Germany, 22559 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting München, Germany, 80336 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Würzburg, Germany, 97080 Italy Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Ancona, AN, Italy, 60126 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Milano, MI, Italy, 20162 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Milano, MI, Italy, 20149 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Padova, PD, Italy, 35128 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Napoli, Italy, 80131 Japan Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Maebashi, Gunma, Japan, 371-8511 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Kyoto-city, Kyoto, Japan, 612-8555 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Suita-city, Osaka, Japan, 565-0871 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Hamamatsu, Shizuoka, Japan, 431-3192 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan, 113-8655 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan, 113-8603 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan, 105-8470 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan, 162-8666 Netherlands Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Rotterdam, Netherlands, 3015 CE Peru Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Jesus Maria, Lima, Peru, 11 Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Miraflores, Lima, Peru, 18 Poland Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Poznan, Poland, 60-355 Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Warszawa, Poland, 01-809 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Wroclaw, Poland, 50-367 Russian Federation Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Moscow, Russian Federation, 117036 Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting St.- Petersburg, Russian Federation, 199034 Spain Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Sevilla, Andalucía, Spain, 41013 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Barcelona, Cataluña, Spain, 08025 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Alzira, Comunidad Valenciana, Spain, 46600 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Pamplona, Navarra, Spain, 31002 Thailand Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Bangkok, Thailand, 10700 Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Bangkok, Thailand, 10330 Turkey Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Diskapi / Ankara, Turkey, 06110 Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Istanbul, Turkey, 34303 Novartis Investigative Site Not yet recruiting Izmir, Turkey, 35340 United Kingdom Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Salford, Manchester, United Kingdom, M6 8HD Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Norwich, United Kingdom, NR4 7UY Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Sheffield, United Kingdom, S5 7AU Novartis Investigative Site Recruiting Southampton, United Kingdom, SO16 6YD
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