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Found 83 results

  1. Presented by Nathan T Zwagerman MD Director of Pituitary and Skull base surgery Department of Neurosurgery Medical College of Wisconsin After registering you will receive a confirmation email with details about joining the webinar. Date: Wednesday, August 21, 2019 Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time Webinar Description: Learning Objectives: Describe the signs and symptoms of Cushing's Disease Describe the work up for patients with Cushing's Disease Understand the goals, risks, and expected outcomes for treatment Describe alternative treatments when surgery is not curative. Presenter Bio: Dr. Zwagerman is a Professor of Neurosurgery at the Medical College of Wisconsin. He did his undergraduate work in psychology at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He earned his medical degree at Wayne State University in Detroit. He did his fellowship in endoscopic and open cranial base surgery, and then his residency in neurological surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.
  2. Presented by Nathan T Zwagerman MD Director of Pituitary and Skull base surgery Department of Neurosurgery Medical College of Wisconsin After registering you will receive a confirmation email with details about joining the webinar. Date: Wednesday, August 21, 2019 Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time Webinar Description: Learning Objectives: Describe the signs and symptoms of Cushing's Disease Describe the work up for patients with Cushing's Disease Understand the goals, risks, and expected outcomes for treatment Describe alternative treatments when surgery is not curative. Presenter Bio: Dr. Zwagerman is a Professor of Neurosurgery at the Medical College of Wisconsin. He did his undergraduate work in psychology at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He earned his medical degree at Wayne State University in Detroit. He did his fellowship in endoscopic and open cranial base surgery, and then his residency in neurological surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.
  3. Recovery of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis can occur as late as 12 months after transsphenoidal adenomectomy (TSA), according to study results published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. These findings emphasize the need to periodically assess these patients to avoid unnecessary hydrocortisone replacement. The primary treatment for most pituitary lesions is TSA. After pituitary surgery, the recovery of pituitary hormone deficits may be delayed; limited data are available regarding the postsurgical recovery of hormonal axes or predictors of recovery. The goal of this study was to assess HPA axis dysfunction and predictive markers of recovery following TSA, as well as time to recovery, to identify subgroups of patients who may be more likely to recover. This single-center observational retrospective study enrolled 109 patients in the United Kingdom (71 men; mean age, 56 years; range, 17 to 82 years) who underwent TSA between February 2015 and September 2018 and had ≥1 reevaluation of the HPA axis with the short Synacthen (cosyntropin) test. The primary outcome was recovery of HPA axis function 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 9 to 12 months after TSA. In 23 patients (21.1%), there was no evidence of pituitary hormone deficit before TSA. In 44 patients (40.4%), there was 1 hormone deficiency and in 25 patients (22.9%), preoperative evaluation showed >1 hormone deficiency. Of the 23 patients with abnormal HPA function before surgery, 8 patients (34.8%) had recovered 6 weeks after the surgery. Patients who recovered were younger (mean age, 50±14 vs 70±9 years; P =.008) compared with patients who did not respond. Of the 15 remaining patients, 2 (13.3%) recovered at 3 months and 3 (20%) recovered at 9 to 12 months. With regard to HPA function in the entire cohort 6 weeks after surgery, 32 patients (29.4%) did not pass the short Synacthen test. Of this group, 5 patients (15.6%) recovered at 3 months, 4 (12.5%) at 6 months, and 2 (6.2%) recovered 9 to 12 months after the surgery. Predictors of future adrenal recovery at 6 weeks included having preoperative 30-minute cortisol >430 nmol/L (P <.001) and a day 8 postoperative cortisol >160 nmol/L (P =.001). With these cutoffs, 80% of patients with preoperative 30-minute cortisol >430 nmol/L (odds ratio [OR], 7.556; 95% CI, 2.847-20.055) and 80% of patients with day 8 postoperative cortisol >160 nmol/L (OR, 9.00; 95% CI, 2.455-32.989) passed the short Synacthen test at 6 weeks postsurgery. In addition, a 6-week baseline short Synacthen test cortisol level above or below 180 nmol/L (P <.001) predicted adrenal recovery at that time point. None of the patients with all 3 variables below the aforementioned cutoffs recovered HPA axis within 1 year. On the other hand, 91.8% of patients with all 3 variables above those cutoffs had normal adrenal function at 6 weeks (OR, 12.200; 95% CI, 5.268-28.255). In addition to the retrospective design, the study had other limitations, including the potential for selection bias, a heterogeneous patient cohort, and no data beyond 12 months after the surgery. “[T]hese data offer the opportunity for patients who may have been given life-long replacement, to safely come off therapy and therefore avoid unnecessary glucocorticoid exposure,” wrote the researchers. Reference Pofi R, Gunatilake S, Macgregor V, et al. Recovery of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis following transsphenoidal adenomectomy for non-ACTH secreting macroadenomas [published online June 21, 2019]. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. doi:10.1210/jc.2019-00406 From https://www.endocrinologyadvisor.com/home/topics/adrenal/recovery-of-hpa-axis-can-occur-late-after-transsphenoidal-adenomectomy/
  4. until
    **REGISTER NOW!** Saturday, Sept 14, 2019 7:30am – 4:00pm Please join the Pituitary Network Association and The Ohio State University for a Pituitary Patient Symposium featuring a series of pituitary and hormonal patient education sessions presented by some of the top physicians of pituitary and hormonal medicine. The symposium faculty will share the most up-to-date information and be available to answer your most pressing questions. Keynote Speaker: Maria Fleseriu, MD FACE **We are offering a limited number of registration only scholarships. Register today to claim your scholarship!** Please email carol@pituitary.org to register! *This registration is for the Patient Symposium only. The Ohio State University is offering a CME Course separate from our Symposium. For information on the CME course go to ccme.osu.edu OSU Pituitary Symposium Agenda Saturday, Sept. 14, 2019 Patient and Family Track Gabbe Conference Room – James L045 7:30 AM Registration and Breakfast 8:00 AM Welcoming Remarks and Introductions: The OSU Skull Base and Pituitary Team 8:05 AM Trans-sphenoidal Approach: What to Expect? Post-Operative Complications Richard Carrau, MD Professor Department of Otolaryngology OSUCCC - James 8:30 AM Radiation Therapy? Difference Between Modalities and Possible Risks Dukagjin M Blakaj, MD, PhD OSUCCC - James 9:00 AM What Are The Challenges Our Patients Face, and How Can We Help? Kami Perdue, PA-C OSUCCC - James 9:30 AM Round Table Q & A 9:45 AM Mid-Morning Break and Visit Vendors 10:00 AM Acromegaly: Why it Takes That Long to Diagnose? What are the Options? Lawrence Kirschner, MD, PhD Professor Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism OSUCCC - James 10:30 AM Growth Hormone Deficiency: Beyond Growth Rohan Henry, MD Pediatric Endocrinologist Nationwide Children's Hospital 11:00 AM Hypopituitarism: Pitfalls and Recommendations Maria Fleseriu, MD, FACE Oregon Health and Science University - Keynote Speaker 11:30 AM Round Table Q & A 11:45 AM Lunch Break and Patient's Journey 12:45 PM Pituitary Trivia Luma Ghalib, MD Assistant Professor - Clinical Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism OSUCCC - James Brian Lee, RN OSUCCC - James 1:15 PM Surgical Approach: What to Expect Daniel Prevedello, MD Professor and Chair, Department of Neurological Surgery OSUCCC - James 1:45 PM Visual Complications of Pituitary/Sellar Lesion? Predictors of Outcome Abbe Craven, MD Assistant Professor - Clinical Department of Ophthalmology OSUCCC - James 2:15 PM Round Table Q & A 2:30 PM Mid-Afternoon Break and Visit Vendors 2:45 PM Recovering from Trans-sphenoidal Surgery, Challenges for the Patient and their Families Traci Douglass, RN OSUCCC - James 3:15 PM Pituitary Network Association: Cushing's Disease: Psychological Research and Clinical Implications Jessica Diller Kovler, AM, MA, PhD PNA Board Member 3:45 PM Closing Remarks 4: 00 PM Adjourn
  5. Dr. Theodore Friedman hosts Gautam Mehta, MD for a fascinating webinar on Approaches for Pituitary Surgery Dr. Mehta is a neurosurgeon specializing in pituitary surgery at the House Clinic in Los Angeles. He was trained by Ian McCutcheon, MD and Ed Oldfield, MD Topics to be discussed include: • How does Dr. Friedman diagnose Cushing’s Disease • How does Dr. Friedman determine who goes to surgery? • What type of patients need surgery besides those with Cushing’s Disease? • How do the neurosurgeon and the Endocrinologist work together? • How does the neurosurgeon read pituitary MRIs? • What types of surgical approaches are used for pituitary surgery? • How long does surgery take and how long will a patient be in the hospital? • What are the risks of pituitary surgery and how can they be minimized? Sunday • August 4 • 6 PM PDT Click here to start your meeting. or https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=ma1d8d5ef99605e305980e2f7cdfdb7bd OR Join by phone: (855) 797-9485 Meeting Number (Access Code): 807 028 597 Your phone/computer will be muted on entry. Slides will be available on the day of the talk at slides There will be plenty of time for questions using the chat button. Meeting Password: hormones For more information, email us at mail@goodhormonehealth.com
  6. Dr. Theodore Friedman hosts Gautam Mehta, MD for a fascinating webinar on Approaches for Pituitary Surgery Dr. Mehta is a neurosurgeon specializing in pituitary surgery at the House Clinic in Los Angeles. He was trained by Ian McCutcheon, MD and Ed Oldfield, MD Topics to be discussed include: • How does Dr. Friedman diagnose Cushing’s Disease • How does Dr. Friedman determine who goes to surgery? • What type of patients need surgery besides those with Cushing’s Disease? • How do the neurosurgeon and the Endocrinologist work together? • How does the neurosurgeon read pituitary MRIs? • What types of surgical approaches are used for pituitary surgery? • How long does surgery take and how long will a patient be in the hospital? • What are the risks of pituitary surgery and how can they be minimized? Sunday • August 4 • 6 PM PDT Click here to start your meeting. or https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=ma1d8d5ef99605e305980e2f7cdfdb7bd OR Join by phone: (855) 797-9485 Meeting Number (Access Code): 807 028 597 Your phone/computer will be muted on entry. Slides will be available on the day of the talk at slides There will be plenty of time for questions using the chat button. Meeting Password: hormones For more information, email us at mail@goodhormonehealth.com
  7. Patients with Cushing’s disease may develop post-traumatic stress symptoms, which are generally resolved once they undergo surgery to remove the tumor, but can persist in some cases, a study shows. The study, “Posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in patients with Cushing’s disease before and after surgery: A prospective study,” was published in the Journal of Clinical Neuroscience. Cushing’s disease is an endocrine disorder characterized by excess secretion of the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) by a pituitary adenoma (tumor of the pituitary gland). This leads to high levels of cortisol, a condition known as hypercortisolism. Chronic hypercortisolism is associated with symptoms such as central obesity, buffalo hump, body bruising, muscle weakness, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and weak bones. Additionally, patients can develop psychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety, and cognitive dysfunction, all of which contribute considerably to a lower health-related quality of life. Depression and anxiety rates are particularly high in Cushing’s disease patients, with 54% of them experiencing major depression and 79% having anxiety. Due to the significant impact of psychological factors in these patients, they may be susceptible to post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). But more information on this phenomenon in these patients is still needed. To address this lack of data, a group of Chinese researchers conducted a prospective study to investigate the occurrence, correlated factors, and prognosis of PTSS in patients with Cushing’s disease. A total of 49 patients newly diagnosed with Cushing’s disease who underwent transsphenoidal removal of the tumor as their first-line treatment were asked to participate in this study. Another group of 49 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals were included as controls. PTSS was measured using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), depression/anxiety were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS), and quality of life was measured using the 36-item short-form (SF-36). These parameters were measured before surgery, and then at six and 12 months after the procedure. Before surgery, 15 patients (30.6%) had PTSS. These patients also had higher cortisol levels, worse levels of depression/anxiety, and worse quality of life scores than those without PTSS. While most of the patients recovered after the operation, there were five (33.3%) for whom PTSS persisted for more than a year. Additionally, one patient who had a recurrence of Cushing’s disease developed PTSS between six and 12 months after the first surgery. PTSS severity showed consistent improvement after surgery, which was correlated with better depression/anxiety scores and psychological aspects of the SF-36. However, Cushing’s disease patients in remission still performed worse than healthy individuals concerning their physical and mental health. Therefore, “patients with [Cushing’s disease] can develop PTSS, and they may persist for over a year even after successful surgery. Combined psychological intervention is advised for these patients,” the researchers concluded. From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2019/06/25/cushings-patients-often-have-post-traumatic-stress-symptoms
  8. The oral chemotherapy temozolomide might be an effective treatment for Cushing’s disease caused by aggressive tumors in the pituitary gland that continue to grow after surgery and taking other medications, a case report suggests. The study, “Successful reduction of ACTH secretion in a case of intractable Cushing’s disease with pituitary Crooke’s cell adenoma by combined modality therapy including temozolomide,” was published in the journal J-Stage. Cushing’s disease is often caused by a tumor in the pituitary gland that secretes high levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), leading to high levels of cortisol and other symptoms. Macroadenomas are aggressive, fast-growing tumors that reach sizes larger than 10 millimeters. Crooke’s cell adenoma is a type of macroadenoma that does not respond to conventional therapies, but has deficient mechanisms of DNA repair. That is why chemotherapeutic agents that damage the DNA, such as temozolomide, might be potential treatments. Researchers in Japan reported the case of a 56-year-old woman with Cushing’s disease caused by a Crooke’s cell adenoma in the pituitary gland who responded positively to temozolomide. The patient was diagnosed with Cushing’s disease at age 39 when she went to the hospital complaining of continuous weight gain. She also had excessive production of urine and a loss of vision in the right eye. The lab tests showed high levels of cortisol and ACTH, and the MRI detected a tumor of 4.5 centimeters in the pituitary gland. The doctors removed a part of the tumor surgically, which initially reduced the levels of ACTH and cortisol. However, the hormone levels and the size of the residual tumor started to increase gradually after the surgery, despite treatment with several medications. By the time the patient was 56 years old, she went to the hospital complaining of general fatigue, leg edema (swelling from fluid), high blood pressure, and central obesity (belly fat). Further examination showed a 5.7 cm tumor, identified as a Crooke’s cell macroadenoma. The patient underwent a second surgery to remove as much tumor as possible, but the levels of ACTH remained high. She took temozolomide for nine months, which normalized the levels of ACTH and cortisol. After the treatment, the patient no longer had high blood pressure or leg edema. The tumor shrunk considerably in the year following temozolomide treatment. The patient started radiation therapy to control tumor growth. The levels of cortisol and ACHT remained normal, and the tumor did not grow in the seven years following temozolomide treatment. “These clinical findings suggest that [temozolomide] treatment to patients with Crooke’s cell adenoma accompanied with elevated ACTH may be a good indication to induce lowering ACTH levels and tumor shrinkage,” researchers wrote. Other cases of Cushing’s disease caused by aggressive macroadenomas showed positive results, such as reduction of tumor size and decrease in plasma ACTH, after temozolomide treatment. However, more studies are needed to establish the ideal course of chemotherapy to treat these tumors, the researchers noted. From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2019/06/18/temozolomide-effective-cushings-disease-aggressive-tumors-case-report/
  9. Removal of pituitary adenomas by inserting surgical instruments through the nose (transsphenoidal resection) remains the best treatment option for pediatric patients, despite its inherent technical difficulties, a new study shows. The study, “Transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas in pediatric patients: a multicentric retrospective study,” was published in the journal Child’s Nervous System. Pituitary adenomas are rare, benign tumors that slowly grow in the pituitary gland. The incidence of such tumors in the pediatric population is reported to be between 1% and 10% of all childhood brain tumors and between 3% and 6% of all surgically treated adenomas. Characteristics of patients that develop these pituitary adenomas vary significantly in different studies with regards to their age, gender, size of adenoma, hormonal activity, and recurrence rates. As the pituitary gland is responsible for hormonal balance, alterations in hormone function due to a pituitary adenoma can significantly affect the quality of life of a child. In most cases, pituitary adenomas can be removed surgically. A common removal method is with a transsphenoidal resection, the goal of which is to completely remove the growing mass and cause the least harm to the surrounding structures. In this study, the researchers report the surgical treatment of pediatric pituitary adenomas at three institutions. They collected data from 27 children who were operated for pituitary adenoma using one of two types of transsphenoidal surgeries — endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery (EETS) and transsphenoidal microsurgery (TMS) — at the University Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty in Istanbul, Turkey, at San Matteo Hospital in Pavia, and at the University of Insubria-Varese in Varese, Italy. The study included 11 males (40.7%) and 16 females (59.3%), with a mean age of 15.3 (ranging between 4 and 18). Medical records indicated that 32 surgical procedures were performed in the 27 patients, as six children required a second operation. Among the patients, 13 had Cushing’s disease, while the rest had growth-hormone-secreting adenomas, prolactinomas, or non-functional adenomas. The researchers found that most patients underwent remission following their surgery. Among the 27 patients, 22 patients (81.4%) underwent remission while five patients (18.5%) did not. Four patients underwent remission after a second operation. Based on these findings, the team believes that the transsphenoidal surgical approach adequately removes pituitary tumors and restores normal hormonal balance in the majority of pediatric patients with pituitary adenomas. “Satisfactory results are reported with both EETS and TMS in the literature,” they wrote. “Despite the technical difficulties in pediatric age, transsphenoidal resection of adenoma is still the mainstay treatment that provides cure in pediatric patients.” From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2019/05/30/transsphenoidal-surgery-effective-remove-pituitaty-adenomas-children-study/
  10. Keynote Speaker: Maria Fleseriu, MD FACE Registration Cost: Individual $40 Save $20 and register for 2: $60 Please email carol@pituitary.org to register! *This registration is for the Patient Symposium only. The Ohio State University is offering a CME Course separate from our Symposium. For information on the CME course go to ccme.osu.edu OSU Pituitary Symposium Agenda Saturday, July 13, 2019 Patients and Family’s Track Gabbe Conference Room – James L045 8:00 AM Registration and Breakfast 8:20 AM Welcoming Remarks and Introductions: The OSU Skull Base and Pituitary Team Lawrence Kirschner, MD, PhD OSUCCC - James 8:30 AM Hypopituitarism: Pitfalls and Recommendations Maria Fleseriu, MD, FACE Oregon Health and Science University 9:00 AM Trans-sphenoidal Approach: What to Expect? Post-Operative Complications Richard Carrau, MD OSUCCC - James 9:30 AM Acromegaly: Why it Takes That Long to Diagnose? What are the Options? Lawrence Kirschner, MD, PhD OSUCCC - James 10:00 AM Round Table Q & A 10:15 AM Mid-Morning Break 10:30 AM Growth Hormone Deficiency: Journey to Adulthood Robert Hoffman Nationwide Children's Hospital 11:00 AM Radiation Therapy? Difference Between Modalities and Possible Risks Dukagjin M Blakaj, MD, PhD OSUCCC - James 11:30 AM Round Table Q & A 11:45 AM Lunch Break and Patient's Journey 12:45 AM Surgical Approach: What to Expect Daniel Prevedello, MD Douglas Hardesty, MD OSUCCC - James 1:15 PM Visual Complications of Pituitary/Sellar Lesion? Predictors of Outcome Abbe Craven, MD OSUCCC - James 1:45 PM Round Table Q & A 2:00 PM Pituitary Trivia Luma Ghalib, MD Brian Lee OSUCCC - James 2:30 PM Pituitary Dysfunction: Effect on Mental Health and Family William Malarkey, MD OSUCCC - James 3:00 PM Recovering from Trans-sphenoidal Surgery, Challenges for the Patient and their Families Traci Douglass, RN OSUCCC - James 3:30 PM Pituitary Network Association: Cushing's Disease: Psychological Research and Clinical Implications Jessica Diller Kovler, AM, MA, PhD PNA Board Member 4:00 PM Closing Remarks 4: 15 PM Adjourn
  11. In patients with a diagnosis of Cushing disease in whom magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows either no abnormalities or nonspecific abnormalities, surgery is preferable to medical treatment, according to study results published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. There is a consensus that the first line of treatment for Cushing disease is transsphenoidal surgery to remove the pituitary adenoma causing the disease, with an 80% remission rate following the intervention. However, in the absence of clear evidence of a pituitary adenoma on imaging, there is some controversy regarding the best treatment. The goal of this retrospective single-center study was to assess the outcomes of surgery in patients with Cushing disease with clear evidence of a pituitary adenoma on MRI compared with outcomes in patients with inconclusive or normal MRI. The cohort included 195 patients treated with transsphenoidal surgery between 1992 and 2018 (156 women; mean age at surgery, 41 years) classified into 4 MRI groups: 89 patients were found to have microadenoma, 18 had macroadenoma, 44 had nonspecific/inconclusive abnormalities on MRI results, and 44 had normal imaging results. The researchers reported that MRI performance in their neuroradiology department improved with time; the proportion of inconclusive or normal MRI results decreased from 60% in 1992 to 1996 to 27% in 2012 to 2018 (P =.037). In analyzing the influence of MRI findings on remission rates, the researchers found no significant difference among the 4 groups: remission rate was 85% for microadenomas, 94% for macroadenomas, 73% for inconclusive MRI, and 75% for negative MRI (P =.11). This finding indicates the overall percentage of patients in remission after transsphenoidal surgery is only slightly lower in those with normal or inconclusive MRI results compared with patients with clear evidence of microadenoma or macroadenoma. There was no difference in remission rate after a microscopic vs endoscopic surgical approach (P =.16). The researchers found that endoscopic-assisted surgery allowed a higher visualization rate than microscopic-assisted surgery. Although the neurosurgeon had a better visualization rate than MRI (100% vs 72%, respectively), there were some false-positive findings; thus, positive predictive value was similar (84% vs 78%, respectively). The study had several limitations including the retrospective design. In addition, in light of the long study duration, the researchers noted that changes in MRI technology and surgical procedures occurred over time. The researchers proposed that after exclusion of nonneoplastic hypercortisolism, patients with Cushing disease, an inconclusive or normal MRI, and a pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone gradient at bilateral inferior petrosal sampling be directed to an expert neurosurgeon for transsphenoidal surgery rather than treated medically. Reference Cristante J, Lefournier V, Sturm N, et al. Why we should still treat by neurosurgery patients with Cushing’s disease and a normal or inconclusive pituitary MRI [published online May 14, 2019]. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. doi:10.1210/jc.2019-00333 From https://www.endocrinologyadvisor.com/home/topics/adrenal/transsphenoidal-surgery-recommended-for-cushing-disease-with-inconclusive-or-normal-mri/
  12. NEW ORLEANS — The investigational drug osilodrostat (Novartis) continues to show promise for treating Cushing's disease, now with new phase 3 trial data. The data from the phase 3, multicenter, double-blind randomized withdrawal study (LINC-3) of osilodrostat in 137 patients with Cushing's disease were presented here at ENDO 2019: The Endocrine Society Annual Meeting by Beverly M.K. Biller, MD, of the Neuroendocrine & Pituitary Tumor Center at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. "Osilodrostat was effective and shows promise for the treatment of patients with Cushing's disease," Biller said. Osilodrostat is an oral 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor, the enzyme that catalyzes the last step of cortisol biosynthesis in the adrenal cortex. Its mechanism of action is similar to that of the older Cushing's drug metyrapone, but osilodrostat has a longer plasma half-life and is more potent against 11β-hydroxylase. Significantly more patients randomized to osilodrostat maintained a mean urinary free cortisol (mUFC) response versus placebo at 34 weeks following a 24-week open-label period plus 8-week randomized phase, with rapid and sustained mUFC reduction in most patients. Patients also experienced improvements in clinical signs of hypercortisolism and quality of life. The drug was generally well-tolerated and had no unexpected side effects. Asked to comment, session comoderator Julia Kharlip, MD, associate medical director of the Pituitary Center at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, told Medscape Medical News, "This drug is incredibly exciting because over 80% of people were controlled fairly rapidly. People could get symptom relief but also a reliable response. You don't have to wonder when you're treating a severely affected patient if it's going to work. It's likely going to work." However, Kharlip cautioned that it remains to be seen whether osilodrostat continues to work long-term, given that the older drug metyrapone — which must be given four times a day versus twice daily for osilodrostat — is known to become ineffective over time because the pituitary tumor eventually overrides the enzyme blockade. "Based on how osilodrostat is so much more effective at smaller doses, there's more hope that it will be effective long term...If the effectiveness and safety profile that we're observing now continues to show the same performance years in a row, then we've got our drug." Osilodrostat Potentially Addresses an Unmet Medical Need Cushing's disease is a rare disorder of chronic hypercortisolism with significant burden, increased mortality, and decreased quality of life. Pituitary surgery is the recommended first-line treatment for most patients, but not all patients remit with surgery and some require additional treatment. Pasireotide (Signifor, Novartis), an orphan drug approved in the United States and Europe for the treatment of Cushing's disease in patients who fail or are ineligible for surgical therapy, is also only effective in a minority of patients. "There hasn't been a medicine effective for long-term treatment, so a lot of patients end up getting bilateral adrenalectomy, thereby exchanging one chronic medical disease for another," Kharlip explained. Biller commented during the question-and-answer period, "I think because not all patients are placed in remission with surgery initially and because other patients subsequently recur — a problem that is more common than we used to believe — we do need medical therapies." She continued, "I think it's important to have a large choice of medical therapies that work in different places in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. "Even though surgery is the right initial therapy for everyone, I think in terms of subsequent medical therapy we have to tailor that to the individual circumstances of the patient in terms of the goals of treatment, and perhaps what other medicines they're on, the degree of cortisol excess [and other factors]." Highly Significant Normalization in Mean UFC Versus Placebo In a prior 22-week phase 2 study (LINC-2), osilodrostat normalized mUFC in most patients. Results of the extension phase were reported by Medscape Medical News 2 years ago. The current phase 3 study, LINC-3, was conducted on the basis of that proof-of-concept study, Biller said. The trial was conducted in 19 countries across four continents in patients with persistent or recurrent Cushing's disease screened for mUFC > 1.5 times the upper limit of normal and other entry criteria. In total, 137 patients were enrolled and randomized. Participants were a median age of 40 years, 77% were female, and 88% had undergone prior pituitary surgery. Nearly all (96%) had received at least one previous treatment for Cushing's. At baseline, patients' mean mUFC (364 µg/24 hours) was 7.3 times the upper limit of normal, which is "quite significant hypercortisolemia," Biller noted. All patients initially received osilodrostat, with a rapid dose uptitration every 2 weeks from 2 to 30 mg orally twice daily until they achieved a normal UFC. They continued on open-label medication until week 24, when urine samples were collected. Patients who had an mUFC less than the upper limit of normal and had not had a dose increase in the prior 12 weeks were eligible for the double-blind phase. Those who were ineligible continued taking open-label drug. The 70 eligible patients were randomized to continue taking osilodrostat (n = 36) or were switched to placebo (n = 34) for another 8 weeks. After that, the patients taking placebo were switched back to osilodrostat until week 48. A total of 113 patients completed the 48 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was mUFC at 34 weeks (the end of the 8-week randomized phase). For those randomized to continue on the drug, mUFC remained in the normal range in 86.1% of patients versus just 29.4% of those who had been switched to placebo for the 8 weeks. The difference was highly significant (odds ratio, 13.7; P < .001), Biller reported. A key secondary endpoint, proportion of patients with an mUFC at or below the ULN at 24 weeks without up-titration after week 12, was achieved in 53%. The mean dose at 48 weeks was 11.0 mg/day, "a fairly low dose," she noted. Clinical features were also improved at week 48, including systolic and diastolic blood pressure (percentage change –6.8 and –6.6, respectively), weight (–4.6), waist circumference (–4.2), fasting plasma glucose (–7.1), and HbA1c (–5.4). Scores on the Cushing Quality of Life scale improved by 52.4 points, and Beck Depression Inventory scores dropped by 31.8 points. Most Adverse Events Temporary, Manageable The most commonly reported adverse events were nausea (41.6%), headache (33.6%), fatigue (28.5%), and adrenal insufficiency (27.7%), and 10.9% of patients overall discontinued because of an adverse event. Adverse events related to hypocortisolism occurred in 51.1% of patients overall, with 10.2% being grade 3 or 4. However, most of these were single episodes of mild-to-moderate intensity and mainly occurred during the initial 12-week titration period. Most patients responded to dose reduction or glucocorticoid supplementation. Adverse events related to accumulation of adrenal hormone precursors occurred in 42.3% of patients overall, with the most common being hypokalemia (13.1%) and hypertension (12.4%). No male patients had signs or symptoms related to increased androgens or estrogens. However, 12 female patients experienced hirsutism, most of those patients also had acne, and one had hypertrichosis. None discontinued because of those symptoms. Kharlip commented, "What's really inspiring was that even though half of the patients had symptoms related to adrenal insufficiency, it sounded as if they were quickly resolved with treatment and none discontinued because of it." "And it may have been related to study design where the medication was titrated very rapidly. There is probably a way to do this more gently and get the good results without the side effects." Kharlip also praised the international consortium that devised the protocol and collaborated in the research effort. "It's incredibly exciting and gratifying to see the world come together to get these data. It's such a rare disease. To be able to have something like that in the field is a dream, to have a working consortium. The protocol was effective in demonstrating efficacy. It's just a win on so many levels for a disease that currently doesn't have a good therapy...I struggle with these patients all the time so I'm thrilled that there is hope." An ongoing confirmatory phase 3 study, LINC-4, is evaluating patients up to 48 weeks. Biller is a consultant for and has received grants from Novartis and Strongbridge. Kharlip has reported no relevant financial relationships. For more diabetes and endocrinology news, follow us on Twitter and on Facebook. From https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/910864#vp_1
  13. The Stanford Pituitary Center invites patients with pituitary disease, their family and friends to Stanford's Pituitary Patient Education Day! May 18, 2019 at the Sheraton Palo Alto Hotel 625 El Camino Real Palo Alto, CA 94301 USA Topics and Breakout Sessions: Function of the pituitary gland General review of pituitary tumors Endoscopic endonasal surgery for pituitary tumors Quality of life after endonasal surgery Radiation therapy for pituitary tumors Cushing's Disease, prolactinoma, and acromegaly Hypopituitarism therapy and growth hormone deficiency Speakers: Olivia Chu, NP, Nurse Practitioner Robert Dodd, MD, Associate Professor of Neurosurgery Juan Fernandez-Miranda, MD, Professor of Neurosurgery Andrew Hoffman, MD, Professor of Medicine Peter Hwang, MD, Professor of Otolaryngology Laurence Katznelson, MD, Professor of Neurosurgery and Medicine Erin Wolff, NP, Nurse Practitioner Course Directors: Juan C. Fernandez-Miranda, MD, FACS Professor of Neurosurgery, and by Courtesy, of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery Co-Director, Stanford Skull Base Surgery Program Laurence Katznelson, MD Professor of Neurosurgery and of Medicine (Endocrinology) Medical Director, Pituitary Center
  14. Cushing’s disease patients in Sweden have a higher risk of death than the general Swedish population, particularly of cardiovascular complications, and that increased risk persists even in patients in remission, a large nationwide study shows. The study, “Overall and disease-specific mortality in patients with Cushing’s disease: a Swedish nationwide study,” was published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. The outcomes of Cushing’s disease patients have improved with the introduction of several therapeutic approaches, such as minimally invasive surgery and cortisol-lowering therapies. However, mortality is still high, especially among those who do not achieve remission. While currently patients in remission are thought to have a better prognosis, it is still unclear whether these patients still have a higher mortality than the general population. Understanding whether these patients are more likely to die and what risk factors are associated with increased mortality is critical to reduce death rates among Cushing’s patients. A team of Swedish researchers thus performed a retrospective study that included patients diagnosed with Cushing’s disease who were part of the Swedish National Patient Registry between 1987 and 2013. A total of 502 patients with Cushing’s disease were included in the study, 419 of whom were confirmed to be in remission. Most patients (77%) were women; the mean age at diagnosis was 43 years, and the median follow-up time was 13 years. During the follow-up, 133 Cushing’s patients died, compared to 54 expected deaths in the general population — a mortality rate 2.5 times higher, researchers said. The most common causes of death among Cushing’s patients were cardiovascular diseases, particularly ischemic heart disease and cerebral infarctions. However, infectious and respiratory diseases (including pneumonia), as well as diseases of the digestive system, also contributed to the increased mortality among Cushing’s patients. Of those in remission, 21% died, compared to 55% among those not in remission. While these patients had a lower risk of death, their mortality rate was still 90% higher than that of the general population. For patients who did not achieve remission, the mortality rate was 6.9 times higher. The mortality associated with cardiovascular diseases was increased for both patients in remission and not in remission. Also, older age at the start of the study and time in remission were associated with mortality risk. “A more aggressive treatment of hypertension, dyslipidemia [abnormal amount of fat in the blood], and other cardiovascular risk factors might be warranted in patients with CS in remission,” researchers said. Of the 419 patients in remission, 315 had undergone pituitary surgery, 102 had had their adrenal glands removed, and 116 had received radiation therapy. Surgical removal of the adrenal glands and chronic glucocorticoid replacement therapy were associated with a worse prognosis. In fact, glucocorticoid replacement therapy more than twice increased the mortality risk. Growth hormone replacement was linked with better outcomes. In remission patients, a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus or high blood pressure had no impact on mortality risk. Overall, “this large nationwide study shows that patients with [Cushing’s disease] continue to have excess mortality even after remission,” researchers stated. The highest mortality rates, however, were seen in “patients with persistent disease, those who were treated with bilateral adrenalectomy and those who required glucocorticoid replacement.” “Further studies need to focus on identifying best approaches to obtaining remission, active surveillance, adequate hormone replacement and long-term management of cardiovascular and mental health in these patients,” the study concluded. From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2019/02/28/even-in-remission-cushings-patients-have-excess-mortality-swedish-study-says/
  15. Patna: Improper functioning of the Pituitary gland usually results in excess or under production of hormones that leads to a formation of mass called tumor, which can be benign or malignant. Such tumors in this gland can create numerous serious medical conditions by interfering with the normal functioning of the endocrine system and pituitary gland. “Though the occurrence of tumor is more likely after the age of 30 years, it still can impact at an early age. The survival rates of tumor due to its complicated location also depend on other factors like the patient’s age, type and size of tumor. Mostly, pituitary gland tumors are non cancerous but the exact causes are unknown. Some of them are hereditary and some are caused by a rare genetic disorder called as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. This disorder can also lead to over-activity or enlargement of 3 different endocrine-related glands, which also includes the pituitary gland. “Dr Aditya Gupta, Director, Neurosurgery, Agrim institute for neuro sciences, Artemis Hospital Diagnosis at an early stage can help the treatment procedure to be totally non-invasive with the use of advances technology called as Cyberknife. Cyberknife which is the most advanced radiation therapy is completely non-invasive therapy available for the treatment of benign as well as malignant tumors. This therapy works the best for some pituitary tumors that are upto 2 cm in size and is a very powerful and effective technique for treating patients suffering from early stage primary and medically inoperable tumors. The treatment is safe to administer and also offers a new option in patients with recurrent disease or a single disease in the body. “Highlights of the therapy being ease of access to any complex location without the need to use the surgical knife, precision of the beam with high dose radiation to the tumor location, and the safety. It is a day care procedure without pain and risk, and the patient can get back to daily chores as soon as the session gets over which depends on the tumor typically (30 minutes) and hence eliminates the requirement of any hospital stay.” Added Dr Gupta Depending upon the hormonal variations in the body, there can be a variety of symptoms. The most common symptoms include Headaches, vision problem, tiredness, mood changes, irritability, changes in menstrual cycle in women, impotence, infertility, Inappropriate breast growth or production of breast milk, Cushing’s syndrome which is a combination of weight gain, high blood pressure, diabetes, and easy bruising, the enlargement of the extremities or limbs, thickening of the skull and jaw caused by too much growth hormone. Pituitary gland, which is also known as the master gland has the most important function of producing hormones that regulates the critical organs of the body including thyroid, adrenal glands, ovaries and testes. It is a small pea-size gland located behind the eyes and below the front of the brain. Some tumors produce hormones known as functional tumors, and others can cause the glands to secrete too few or too many hormones. Also if the tumor pressed on the nearby structure, for instance the optic nerve, can also limit a person’s vision. Moreover the procedure makes use of the most sophisticated image guidance technique to focus high doses of radiation directly to the tumor spot which eliminates the chances to damage the healthy cells as in any other methods of treatment. “Each session of treatment usually lasts for about 30 -50 min and is cost effective with a success rate of 98% in such complicated tumors. Patients with pituitary adenomas receive stereotactic radio surgery with CyberKnife and are followed up for more than 12 months. After 2-3 weeks of therapy patients are monitored for positive responses and ensure there is no recurrence of any mass. Stereotactic radio surgery with the CyberKnife is effective and safe against pituitary adenomas.” Said Dr Gupta From https://www.apnnews.com/hormonal-imbalance-indication-of-pituitary-gland-tumors-2/
  16. Huang X, et al. Pituitary. 2019;doi:10.1007/s11102-018-0927-x. March 3, 2019 The use of 3D-printed models could lead to less operation time and blood loss and fewer postoperative complications in adults who undergo endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas and other conditions, according to findings published in Pituitary. “Several factors influence the outcome of endoscopic endonasal surgery, including the tumor volume, patient age, lesion location and sphenoid pneumatolysis,” Xiaobing Jiang, of the department of neurosurgery at Union Hospital of Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, Hubei, China, and colleagues wrote. “An accurate model of the target tumor structure is a major prerequisite for a successful [pituitary adenoma] resection, especially for macroadenomas, as this may avoid disastrous complications due to suboptimal treatment.” Jiang and colleagues conducted a retrospective analysis of 20 adults who underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery at Union Hospital in Wuhan. Participants were included based on similar tumor sizes, the presence of no other diseases and nonintuitive tumor identification. All surgeries in the cohort occurred between January and August 2017, with 10 participants (mean age, 44.4 years; 50% women) receiving CT and MRI before surgery; the remaining 10 also received an operation with 3D printing (mean age, 41.2 years; 50% women). To create the 3D models, images from CT and MRIs were combined. The 3D printer then used this information to create the model, which took between 2 hours, 10 minutes, and 4 hours, 32 minutes, to design and 10 hours, 12 minutes, and 22 hours, 34 minutes, to print. After surgery, the researchers found that mean operation time was lower in participants who had 3D models compared with participants who did not (127 minutes vs. 143.4 minutes; P = .007). In addition, there was less blood loss in participants with 3D printing compared with participants without (159.9 mL vs. 170 mL; P = .009). The researchers noted that there were postoperative complications in 20% of the 3D-printing group and 40% of the CT and MRI alone group. “As it is highly precise and allows personalization, 3D-printing technology has started to be applied in medicine in recent years. In neurosurgery, 3D-printing technology can provide models for the patients’ disease characteristics, such as skull defects, brain tumors, intracranial aneurysms and intracranial vascular malformations,” the researchers wrote. “We believe that with its continuous development, 3D-printing technology will be applied in clinical practice in the near future.” – by Phil Neuffer Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures. From https://www.healio.com/endocrinology/neuroendocrinology/news/online/%7B582c6512-708a-4900-ad20-f0adb5a79390%7D/3d-printing-technology-improves-outcomes-in-pituitary-adenoma-surgery
  17. TOKYO and LONDON, Feb. 20, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Sosei Group Corporation ("the Company"; TSE: 4565), announces that the first healthy subject has been dosed with a novel small molecule HTL0030310 in a Phase I clinical study, marking the start of a new in-house clinical program targeting endocrine disorders, including Cushing's disease. HTL0030310 is a potent and selective agonist of the SSTR5 (somatostatin 5) receptor and the sixth molecule designed by the Company using its GPCR Structure-Based Drug Design (SBDD) platform to enter clinical development. HTL0030310 has been designed to modulate the excess release of hormones from adenomas (benign tumors) of the pituitary gland. Highly elevated plasma levels of pituitary hormones result in a number of serious endocrine disorders, including Cushing's Disease. Cushing's disease is characterized by excessive cortisol release, crucial in regulating metabolism, maintaining cardiovascular function and helping the body respond to stress. A key design feature of HTL0030310 is its significant selectivity for SSTR5 over SSTR2. This selectivity is expected to improve the balance of efficacy vs. dose-limiting side effects and therefore, presents an opportunity to develop a best-in-class medicine for patients with Cushing's disease, in particular. The clinical trial with HTL0030310 is a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled first-in-human study in which single ascending subcutaneous doses of HTL0030310 will be administered to healthy male and female adult subjects. The study is being conducted in the UK and will assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of HTL0030310 in up to 64 subjects. Preliminary results are expected in the second half of 2019 and will provide a first insight into the effects of HTL0030310 on the control of glucose and other endocrine hormones and the potential to target Cushing's disease and other endocrine disorders. Dr. Malcolm Weir, Executive VP and Chief R&D Officer, said: "HTL0030310 is a novel and highly selective molecule, and is the sixth candidate originating from our SBDD platform to advance into human trials. We are not only pleased to begin this new study but also delighted with the productivity of our unique platform to generate attractive candidates targeting GPCRs involved in multiple diseases. These candidates present new prospects for our emerging proprietary pipeline, as well as unique opportunities for partnering, and provide a solid foundation to execute our strategy." About Cushing's disease Cushing's disease is a debilitating endocrine disorder caused by the overproduction of the hormone cortisol and is often triggered by a pituitary adenoma (benign tumour) secreting excess adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Cortisol has a crucial role regulating metabolism, maintaining cardiovascular function and helping the body respond to stress. Symptoms may include weight gain, central obesity, a round, red full face, severe fatigue and weakness, striae (purple stretch marks), high blood pressure, depression and anxiety. Cushing's disease affects 10-15 million people per year, most commonly adults between 20 to 50 years and women more often than men. The first line and most common treatment approach for Cushing's disease is surgical removal of the pituitary tumor followed by radiotherapy and drug therapy designed to reduce cortisol production. Ref: American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) About Sosei Heptares We are an international biopharmaceutical group focused on the design and development of new medicines originating from its proprietary GPCR-targeted StaR® technology and structure-based drug design platform capabilities. The Company is advancing a broad and deep pipeline of partnered and wholly owned product candidates in multiple therapeutic areas, including CNS, immuno-oncology, gastroenterology, inflammation and other rare/specialty indications. Its leading clinical programs include partnered candidates aimed at the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease (with Allergan) and next generation immuno-oncology approaches to treat cancer (with AstraZeneca). Our additional partners and collaborators include Novartis, Pfizer, Daiichi-Sankyo, PeptiDream, Kymab and MorphoSys. The Company is headquartered in Tokyo, Japan with R&D facilities in Cambridge, UK and Zurich, Switzerland. "Sosei Heptares" is the corporate brand of Sosei Group Corporation, which is listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange (ticker: 4565). For more information, please visit https://www.soseiheptares.com/ LinkedIn: @soseiheptaresco | Twitter: @soseiheptaresco | YouTube: @soseiheptaresco Forward-looking statements This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements about the discovery, development and commercialization of products. Various risks may cause Sosei Group Corporation's actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements, including: adverse results in clinical development programs; failure to obtain patent protection for inventions; commercial limitations imposed by patents owned or controlled by third parties; dependence upon strategic alliance partners to develop and commercialize products and services; difficulties or delays in obtaining regulatory approvals to market products and services resulting from development efforts; the requirement for substantial funding to conduct research and development and to expand commercialization activities; and product initiatives by competitors. As a result of these factors, prospective investors are cautioned not to rely on any forward-looking statements. We disclaim any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. View original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sosei-heptares-starts-new-clinical-development-program-300798591.html SOURCE Sosei Heptares
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    Friday April 12, 2019 8:30am – 4:30pm Zuckerman Research Center 417 E. 68th St. New York, NY Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center This course is suited for medical professionals, patients, and caregivers to improve patient care and outcomes through evidence-based discussion of clinical practice guidelines and emerging therapies in order to assess and update current practices to promote earlier diagnosis and treatment of pituitary diseases. The multidisciplinary nature of the course will allow the dissemination of knowledge across the variety of practitioners caring for pituitary patients, as well as for patients and caregivers. After completion of this educational activity, participants will be up-to-date on the latest in ongoing care and clinical management of patients with pituitary conditions. The patient breakout sessions will provide pituitary patients the ability to review treatment options, learn about ongoing clinical trials, and discuss their comprehensive care with providers and other patients. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center is providing this course to pituitary patients and caregivers free of charge. To register to attend, please email cme@mskcc.org . (Please note: Registration is required in order to attend.) Medical Professionals who wish to attend must register online: mskcc.org/PituitaryCourse . View Course Flyer
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    13th Annual Conference for Adults with Endocrine Disorders in Partnership with Barrow Neurological Institute Pituitary Center February 28th, 2019 - March 3rd, 2019 Phoenix, Arizona Schedule of Events Thursday 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm Welcome Reception, Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown Friday 9:00 am - 4:00 pm Exhibitors, Barrow Pituitary Center 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center 12:00 am - 1:00 pm Lunch (included) 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm Group outing to Scottsdale Waterfront Saturday 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center 12:00 am - 1:00 pm Lunch (included) 1:00 pm - 3:30 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center Sunday 9:00 am - 1:30 pm Educational Segments, Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown ********************************************************** Friday Educational Segments at Barrow Pituitary Center 10:00 am Managing Cushings: Navigating Through the Maze, Yuen or 10:00 am Managing AGHD: Daily and Beyond, Knecht 11:00 am Hypothalamic Obesity: Not Just Calories In, Calories Out, Connor 12:00 pm LUNCH (included) 1:00 pm Me, Myself and My Adrenal Insufficiency, Yuen 2:00 pm Navigating the Medical Maze, Herring Saturday Educational Segments at Barrow Pituitary Center 10:00 am Beyond AGHD and Cushings: Familial and Genetic Factors, Stratakis 11:00 am Q&A, Stratakis 12:00 pm LUNCH (included) 1:00 pm Tools for Coping with my Endocrine Disorder, Jonas 2:00 pm Finnigan and Friends: A Year in AI Training, Palmer 2:30 pm Quality of Life Study, Cushings, Edgar & Keil or 2:30 pm Life is What You Make Of It, Jones Sunday Educational Segments at Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown 9:00 am Preventing Muscle Wasting and Nutrition, Fine 10:00 am Nuances of Treating Hypothyroidism, Friedman 11:00 am Macrilen Stimulation Test for Growth Hormone Deficiency, Friedman 11:45 am The New and The Old for Diagnosing Cushing's Syndrome, Friedman 12:30 pm Ask the Wiz, Friedman Location Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center Goldman Auditorium and Sonntag Pavilion 350 W. Thomas Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85013 Transportation will be provided on Friday and Saturday between the Wyndham Hotel to Barrow for an hour prior to the segments and an hour after close of the segments. The hotel is approximately 1/2 mile away from Barrow Pituitary Center if you choose to walk or travel there on your own. Hotel Room Rates and Reservations Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown 3600 N. 2nd Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85013 $109 per night + tax. Includes free wifi, parking and buffet breakfast To make hotel reservations call 602-604-4900 and ask for The MAGIC Foundation guest room block. Refrigerators are first come so be sure to request one when making your reservation. Airport Transportation Transportation is not provided to/from the hotel from the airport. The Wyndham is approximately 9 miles from the airport. Preferred airport is Phoenix, AZ - PHX - Sky Harbor Intl. Deadline to Register and book your hotel is January 28, 2019 View the entire PDF Program
  20. MaryO

    Last Day to Register

    13th Annual Conference for Adults with Endocrine Disorders in Partnership with Barrow Neurological Institute Pituitary Center February 28th, 2019 - March 3rd, 2019 Phoenix, Arizona Schedule of Events Thursday 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm Welcome Reception, Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown Friday 9:00 am - 4:00 pm Exhibitors, Barrow Pituitary Center 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center 12:00 am - 1:00 pm Lunch (included) 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm Group outing to Scottsdale Waterfront Saturday 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center 12:00 am - 1:00 pm Lunch (included) 1:00 pm - 3:30 pm Educational Segments, Barrow Pituitary Center Sunday 9:00 am - 1:30 pm Educational Segments, Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown ********************************************************** Friday Educational Segments at Barrow Pituitary Center 10:00 am Managing Cushings: Navigating Through the Maze, Yuen or 10:00 am Managing AGHD: Daily and Beyond, Knecht 11:00 am Hypothalamic Obesity: Not Just Calories In, Calories Out, Connor 12:00 pm LUNCH (included) 1:00 pm Me, Myself and My Adrenal Insuffiency, Yuen 2:00 pm Navigating the Medical Maze, Herring Saturday Educational Segments at Barrow Pituitary Center 10:00 am Beyond AGHD and Cushings: Familial and Genetic Factors, Stratakis 11:00 am Q&A, Stratakis 12:00 pm LUNCH (included) 1:00 pm Tools for Coping with my Endocrine Disorder, Jonas 2:00 pm Finnigan and Friends: A Year in AI Training, Palmer 2:30 pm Quality of Life Study, Cushings, Edgar & Keil or 2:30 pm Life is What You Make Of It, Jones Sunday Educational Segments at Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown 9:00 am Preventing Muscle Wasting and Nutrition, Fine 10:00 am Nuances of Treating Hypothyroidism, Friedman 11:00 am Macrilen Stimulation Test for Growth Hormone Defiency, Friedman 11:45 am The New and The Old for Diagnosing Cushing's Syndrome, Friedman 12:30 pm Ask the Wiz, Friedman Location Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center Goldman Auditorium and Sonntag Pavilion 350 W. Thomas Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85013 Transportation will be provided on Friday and Saturday between the Wyndham Hotel to Barrow for an hour prior to the segments and an hour after close of the segments. The hotel is approximately 1/2 mile away from Barrow Pituitary Center if you choose to walk or travel there on your own. Hotel Room Rates and Reservations Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown 3600 N. 2nd Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85013 $109 per night + tax. Includes free wifi, parking and buffet breakfast To make hotel reservations call 602-604-4900 and ask for The MAGIC Foundation guest room block. Refrigerators are first come so be sure to request one when making your reservation. Airport Transportation Transportation is not provided to/from the hotel from the airport. The Wyndham is approximately 9 miles from the airport. Preferred airport is Phoenix, AZ - PHX - Sky Harbor Intl. Deadline to Register and book your hotel is January 28, 2019 View the entire PDF Program
  21. Presented by: James K. Liu, MD Professor of Neurosurgery Director of Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School RWJ Barnabas Health After registering you will receive a confirmation email with information about joining the webinar. Register here Date: January 9, 2019 Time: 3:00PM- 4:00 PM Pacific Standard Time, 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM Eastern Standard Time Learning Objectives: To understand the medical therapies for prolactinomas To understand the roles of surgery for prolactinomas To understand the roles of radiation for prolactinomas Presenter Bio: Dr. James K. Liu is the Director of Cerebrovascular, Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery at the Rutgers Neurological Institute of New Jersey, and Professor of Neurological Surgery at Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School. He is board certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery, and has a robust pituitary tumor practice at University Hospital and Saint Barnabas Medical Center. Dr. Liu graduated summa cum laude from UCLA with Phi Beta Kappa honors, and obtained his MD from New York Medical College with AOA honors. After completing a neurosurgery residency at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, he was awarded the Dandy Clinical Fellowship by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and obtained advanced fellowship training in Skull Base, Cerebrovascular Surgery & Neuro-oncology at the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. Dr. Liu is renowned for his comprehensive treatment of complex brain tumors and skull base lesions, including pituitary tumors, acoustic neuromas,meningiomas, craniopharyngiomas, chordomas, and jugular foramen tumors. His robust clinical practice encompasses both traditional open and minimally invasive endoscopic endonasal skull base approaches. He also specializes in microsurgery of cerebrovascular diseases including aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), cavernous malformations, and carotid artery stenosis. He also has expertise in cerebrovascular bypass procedures for moya moya disease, carotid artery occlusion, vertebral artery occlusion, complex aneurysms and skull base tumors, as well as endoscopic-assisted microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm. As one of the most active researchers in his field, Dr. Liu has published extensively with over 250 peer-reviewed publications and 25 textbook chapters. He has taught many hands-on cadaver dissection courses in skull base surgery and has lectured extensively nationally and internationally throughout North America, Latin America, Europe, and Asia. Dr. Liu's research is focused on the development of innovative and novel skull base and endoscopic techniques, quantitative surgical neuroanatomy, microsurgical and microvascular anastomosis skills training, virtual surgical simulation, pituitary tumor biology, and clinical outcomes after skull base and cerebrovascular surgery. Dr. Liu is an active member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, North American Skull Base Society, Pituitary Network Association, The Facial Pain (Trigeminal Neuralgia) Association, AANS/CNS Cerebrovascular Section, Tumor Section. He serves on the medical advisory board of the Acoustic Neuroma Association of New Jersey, and is the current Secretary-Treasurer of the International Meningioma Society.
  22. Presented by: James K. Liu, MD Professor of Neurosurgery Director of Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School RWJ Barnabas Health After registering you will receive a confirmation email with information about joining the webinar. Register here Date: January 9, 2019 Time: 3:00PM- 4:00 PM Pacific Standard Time, 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM Eastern Standard Time Learning Objectives: To understand the medical therapies for prolactinomas To understand the roles of surgery for prolactinomas To understand the roles of radiation for prolactinomas Presenter Bio: Dr. James K. Liu is the Director of Cerebrovascular, Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery at the Rutgers Neurological Institute of New Jersey, and Professor of Neurological Surgery at Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School. He is board certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery, and has a robust pituitary tumor practice at University Hospital and Saint Barnabas Medical Center. Dr. Liu graduated summa cum laude from UCLA with Phi Beta Kappa honors, and obtained his MD from New York Medical College with AOA honors. After completing a neurosurgery residency at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, he was awarded the Dandy Clinical Fellowship by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and obtained advanced fellowship training in Skull Base, Cerebrovascular Surgery & Neuro-oncology at the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. Dr. Liu is renowned for his comprehensive treatment of complex brain tumors and skull base lesions, including pituitary tumors, acoustic neuromas,meningiomas, craniopharyngiomas, chordomas, and jugular foramen tumors. His robust clinical practice encompasses both traditional open and minimally invasive endoscopic endonasal skull base approaches. He also specializes in microsurgery of cerebrovascular diseases including aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), cavernous malformations, and carotid artery stenosis. He also has expertise in cerebrovascular bypass procedures for moya moya disease, carotid artery occlusion, vertebral artery occlusion, complex aneurysms and skull base tumors, as well as endoscopic-assisted microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm. As one of the most active researchers in his field, Dr. Liu has published extensively with over 250 peer-reviewed publications and 25 textbook chapters. He has taught many hands-on cadaver dissection courses in skull base surgery and has lectured extensively nationally and internationally throughout North America, Latin America, Europe, and Asia. Dr. Liu's research is focused on the development of innovative and novel skull base and endoscopic techniques, quantitative surgical neuroanatomy, microsurgical and microvascular anastomosis skills training, virtual surgical simulation, pituitary tumor biology, and clinical outcomes after skull base and cerebrovascular surgery. Dr. Liu is an active member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, North American Skull Base Society, Pituitary Network Association, The Facial Pain (Trigeminal Neuralgia) Association, AANS/CNS Cerebrovascular Section, Tumor Section. He serves on the medical advisory board of the Acoustic Neuroma Association of New Jersey, and is the current Secretary-Treasurer of the International Meningioma Society.
  23. Childs Nerv Syst. 2018 Nov 28. doi: 10.1007/s00381-018-4013-5. [Epub ahead of print] Gazioglu N1, Canaz H2, Camlar M3, Tanrıöver N4, Kocer N5, Islak C5, Evliyaoglu O6, Ercan O6. Author information Abstract AIM: Pituitary adenomas are rare in childhood in contrast with adults. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting adenomas account for Cushing's disease (CD) which is the most common form of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome (CS). Treatment strategies are generally based on data of adult CD patients, although some difficulties and differences exist in pediatric patients. The aim of this study is to share our experience of 10 children and adolescents with CD. PATIENTS AND METHOD: Medical records, images, and operative notes of 10 consecutive children and adolescents who underwent transsphenoidal surgery for CD between 1999 and 2014 in Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine were retrospectively reviewed. Mean age at operation was 14.8 ± 4.2 years (range 5-18). The mean length of symptoms was 24.2 months. The mean follow-up period was 11 years (range 4 to 19 years). RESULTS: Mean preoperative cortisol level was 23.435 μg/dl (range 8.81-59.8 μg/dl). Mean preoperative ACTH level was 57.358 μg/dl (range 28.9-139.9 μg/dl). MR images localized microadenoma in three patients (30%), macroadenoma in four patients (40%) in our series. Transsphenoidal microsurgery and endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery were performed in 8 and 2 patients respectively. Remission was provided in 8 patients (80%). Five patients (50%) met remission criteria after initial operations. Three patients (30%) underwent additional operations to meet remission criteria. CONCLUSION: Transsphenoidal surgery remains the mainstay therapy for CD in pediatric patients as well as adults. It is an effective treatment option with low rate of complications. Both endoscopic and microscopic approaches provide safe access to sella and satisfactory surgical results. KEYWORDS: Cushing’s disease; Endoscopic pituitary surgery; Pediatric; Transsphenoidal microsurgery PMID: 30488233 DOI: 10.1007/s00381-018-4013-5 Full Text
  24. Presented by Mario Zuccarello, MD Neurosurgeon University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Department of Neurosurgery and Jonathan A. Forbes, MD Neurosurgeon University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Department of Neurosurgery After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Contact us at webinar@pituitary.org if you have any questions. Date: December 3, 2018 Time: 3:00PM - 4:00PM Pacific Standard Time 6:00PM - 7:00PM Eastern Standard Time Learning Objectives: To understand the role of surgery in the treatment of pituitary tumors To understand the advantages and disadvantages of different surgical approaches in the treatment of pituitary tumors To understand the risks and benefits associated with different surgical strategies Presenter Bios: Mario Zuccarello, MD Neurosurgeon Mario Zuccarello, MD, is currently a Professor of Neurosurgery in the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Cincinnati. He was the Frank H. Mayfield Chair for Neurological Surgery and Chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery from 2009-2017. Dr. Zuccarello is also a member of the University of Cincinnati Gardner Neuroscience Institute and the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Stroke Team. Dr. Zuccarello is dedicated to clinical research in neurovascular disease and the development of new neurosurgical techniques for the treatment of stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, vasospasm, carotid artery disease, and moyamoya disease. While Cincinnati has become widely known for its leadership in stroke research, treatment, and the development of clot-busting drugs, Dr. Zuccarello has led a quiet revolution in the prevention and treatment of brain hemorrhages, which rank among the most hazardous conditions of the brain. Dr. Zuccarello graduated summa cum laude from the Gymnasium in Catania, Italy, in 1970. He received his medical degree from the University of Padova, Italy, in 1976, and completed his residency in neurosurgery from Padova, with summa cum laude honors, in 1980. He subsequently performed research fellowships at the University of Iowa and the University of Virginia Medical Center, Charlottesville, and a clinical fellowship at the University of Cincinnati. He was inducted into Alpha Omega Alpha, the national medical honor society in 2001 and has been named to the Best Doctors in America since 2005. In 2013, he received recognition by members of the Vasospasm consortium for his dedication and outstanding accomplishments in the field of experimental and clinical research on subarachnoid hemorrhage. Jonathan A. Forbes, MD Neurosurgeon Dr. Forbes is a fellowship-trained neurosurgeon with expertise and interest in open and minimally-invasive approaches for treatment of pathology of the cranial base. He has a long and distinguished history of academic recognition, commitment to excellence, and service to our country. As an undergraduate at Grove City College, he was a recipient of the Trustee Scholarship and was named Sportsman of the Year after his senior season of varsity football. Following the events of 9/11, he enrolled in the Health Professions Scholarship Program with the United States Air Force. In medical school at the University of Pittsburgh, he was a recipient of the David Glasser Honors’ Award for academic performance. During neurosurgical residency at Vanderbilt University, he received numerous national accolades—including the AANS Synthes Craniofacial Award for Research in Neurotrauma as well as the AANS Top Gun Award. His score on the American Board of Neurological Surgery (ABNS) written board examination during his fourth year of residency was recognized in the top 3% nationwide. After completing his chief year of neurosurgical residency at Vanderbilt in 2013, Dr. Forbes went on to fulfill a 4-year commitment with the U.S. Air Force that included a 6-month deployment to Bagram Air Force Base in Afghanistan. Humanitarian care he provided at the Craig Joint Theater Hospital in Bagram has been featured in numerous neurosurgical journals—including Journal of Neurosurgery, World Neurosurgery and Neurosurgical Focus—and recognized on a national level by the USAF as part of the “Through Airmen’s Eyes” series. After honorable discharge from the military, he completed a minimally-invasive skull base fellowship at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City under the guidance of Dr. Theodore Schwartz prior to joining the UC Department of Neurosurgery. To date, Dr. Forbes has contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications.
  25. Presented by Mario Zuccarello, MD Neurosurgeon University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Department of Neurosurgery and Jonathan A. Forbes, MD Neurosurgeon University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Department of Neurosurgery After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Contact us at webinar@pituitary.org if you have any questions. Date: December 3, 2018 Time: 3:00PM - 4:00PM Pacific Standard Time 6:00PM - 7:00PM Eastern Standard Time Learning Objectives: To understand the role of surgery in the treatment of pituitary tumors To understand the advantages and disadvantages of different surgical approaches in the treatment of pituitary tumors To understand the risks and benefits associated with different surgical strategies Presenter Bios: Mario Zuccarello, MD Neurosurgeon Mario Zuccarello, MD, is currently a Professor of Neurosurgery in the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Cincinnati. He was the Frank H. Mayfield Chair for Neurological Surgery and Chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery from 2009-2017. Dr. Zuccarello is also a member of the University of Cincinnati Gardner Neuroscience Institute and the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Stroke Team. Dr. Zuccarello is dedicated to clinical research in neurovascular disease and the development of new neurosurgical techniques for the treatment of stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, vasospasm, carotid artery disease, and moyamoya disease. While Cincinnati has become widely known for its leadership in stroke research, treatment, and the development of clot-busting drugs, Dr. Zuccarello has led a quiet revolution in the prevention and treatment of brain hemorrhages, which rank among the most hazardous conditions of the brain. Dr. Zuccarello graduated summa cum laude from the Gymnasium in Catania, Italy, in 1970. He received his medical degree from the University of Padova, Italy, in 1976, and completed his residency in neurosurgery from Padova, with summa cum laude honors, in 1980. He subsequently performed research fellowships at the University of Iowa and the University of Virginia Medical Center, Charlottesville, and a clinical fellowship at the University of Cincinnati. He was inducted into Alpha Omega Alpha, the national medical honor society in 2001 and has been named to the Best Doctors in America since 2005. In 2013, he received recognition by members of the Vasospasm consortium for his dedication and outstanding accomplishments in the field of experimental and clinical research on subarachnoid hemorrhage. Jonathan A. Forbes, MD Neurosurgeon Dr. Forbes is a fellowship-trained neurosurgeon with expertise and interest in open and minimally-invasive approaches for treatment of pathology of the cranial base. He has a long and distinguished history of academic recognition, commitment to excellence, and service to our country. As an undergraduate at Grove City College, he was a recipient of the Trustee Scholarship and was named Sportsman of the Year after his senior season of varsity football. Following the events of 9/11, he enrolled in the Health Professions Scholarship Program with the United States Air Force. In medical school at the University of Pittsburgh, he was a recipient of the David Glasser Honors’ Award for academic performance. During neurosurgical residency at Vanderbilt University, he received numerous national accolades—including the AANS Synthes Craniofacial Award for Research in Neurotrauma as well as the AANS Top Gun Award. His score on the American Board of Neurological Surgery (ABNS) written board examination during his fourth year of residency was recognized in the top 3% nationwide. After completing his chief year of neurosurgical residency at Vanderbilt in 2013, Dr. Forbes went on to fulfill a 4-year commitment with the U.S. Air Force that included a 6-month deployment to Bagram Air Force Base in Afghanistan. Humanitarian care he provided at the Craig Joint Theater Hospital in Bagram has been featured in numerous neurosurgical journals—including Journal of Neurosurgery, World Neurosurgery and Neurosurgical Focus—and recognized on a national level by the USAF as part of the “Through Airmen’s Eyes” series. After honorable discharge from the military, he completed a minimally-invasive skull base fellowship at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City under the guidance of Dr. Theodore Schwartz prior to joining the UC Department of Neurosurgery. To date, Dr. Forbes has contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications.
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