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  1. The treatment of adrenal insufficiency with hydrocortisone granules in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) was associated with an absence of adrenal crises and normal growth patterns over a 2-year period, according to study findings published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. The study included a total of 17 children with CAH and 1 child with hypopituitarism. All included participants were <6 years old who were receiving current adrenocortical replacement therapy, including hydrocortisone with or without fludrocortisone. Hydrocortisone medications
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  2. Generally overweight people have weight everywhere and don't get a buffalo hump. Please don't give up! I know it's hard to get a diagnosis but definitely worthwhile.
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  3. Context Late-night salivary cortisol (LNSC) measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA-F) is a first-line screening test for Cushing’s syndrome (CS) with a reported sensitivity and specificity of >90%. However, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, validated to measure salivary cortisol (LCMS-F) and cortisone (LCMS-E), has been proposed to be superior diagnostically. Objective, Setting, and Main Outcome Measures Prospectively evaluate the diagnostic performance of EIA-F, LCMS-F, and LCMS-E in 1453 consecutive late-night saliva samples from 705 patients
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  4. This is a remarkable paper and has big implications for testing and the diagnostic algorithm, especially given who the authors are. The blunt takeaway is do not use salivary cortisol for adrenal Cushing's because it doesn't work. They recommend dex test instead but we know that test has problems too--yes, even in adrenal cases. It's not clear to me if this is generalizable to all mild Cushing's, nor does it appear like cyclical or episodic Cushing's was considered. The other thing is that the technically "better" assay (LCMS) has worse sensitivity than the older, cheaper one (EIA). This is the
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  5. Presented by Dr. Magge, Assistant Professor of Neurology at Weill Cornell Medical College and an Assistant Attending Neurologist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Dr. Ranakrishna, Chief of Neurological Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital, Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery at Avina and Willis Murphy at Weill Cornell Medicine Click here to attend. Date: Tuesday, October 13, 2020 Time: 10:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time Learning objectives: - the basic characteristics of the different types of pituitary adenomas -
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  6. Presented by Dr. Magge, Assistant Professor of Neurology at Weill Cornell Medical College and an Assistant Attending Neurologist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Dr. Ranakrishna, Chief of Neurological Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital, Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery at Avina and Willis Murphy at Weill Cornell Medicine Click here to attend. Date: Tuesday, October 13, 2020 Time: 10:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time Learning objectives: - the basic characteristics of the different types of pituitary adenomas -
    1 point
  7. Health Condition: All Conditions Demographics: Ages 18+, United States Resident Special Request(s): Everyone who has taken part in a clinical trial is asked to share. We are interested in learning why you decided to take part in a clinical trial and how your experience went. Honoraria: Some respondents may be asked to participate in a clinical trial awareness network where there are paid opportunities to tell their stories. Apply to learn more.
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