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  1. How stressed are you? Your earwax could hold the answer. A new method of collecting and analyzing earwax for levels of the stress hormone cortisol may be a simple and cheap way to track the mental health of people with depression and anxiety. Cortisol is a crucial hormone that spikes when a person is stressed and declines when they're relaxed. In the short-term, the hormone is responsible for the "fight or flight" response, so it's important for survival. But cortisol is often consistently elevated in people with depression and anxiety, and persistent high levels of cortisol can have
    3 points
  2. Context Late-night salivary cortisol (LNSC) measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA-F) is a first-line screening test for Cushing’s syndrome (CS) with a reported sensitivity and specificity of >90%. However, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, validated to measure salivary cortisol (LCMS-F) and cortisone (LCMS-E), has been proposed to be superior diagnostically. Objective, Setting, and Main Outcome Measures Prospectively evaluate the diagnostic performance of EIA-F, LCMS-F, and LCMS-E in 1453 consecutive late-night saliva samples from 705 patients
    2 points
  3. Presented by Georgios A. Zenonos, MD Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery Associate Director, Center for Skull Base Surgery University of Pittsburgh Medical Center 200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh PA, 15217 Presbyterian Hospital, Suite B400 Register Now! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. Date: Wednesday July 1, 2020 Time: 3:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time, 6:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
    2 points
  4. Unfortunately a 4:30 pm cortisol test can't be used to diagnose or exclude Cushing's. The only useful blood measurement for cortisol would be a midnight one. You really need to do a 24 hour urinary cortisol test.
    2 points
  5. Welcome, Ellie. I can't image how hard it would be to get a diagnosis (or not!) during these COVID times. Unfortunately, results from blood tests aren't going to be the answer - just a part of an answer. You need to get UFCs (urine free cortisol) Do you need to get a referral to an endo? They are the best to diagnose Cushing's - if you get one who is familar with testing. That's the important part. Not all endos "believe in Cushing's" which is incredible to me. Unfortunately, there's no real way of speeding a Cushing's diagnosis along. And, I don't think you'd want to
    2 points
  6. Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including: Who should get an adrenalectomy? How do you optimally replace adrenal hormones? What laboratory tests are needed to monitor replacement? When and how do you stress dose? What about subcut cortisol versus cortisol pumps? Patient Melissa will lead a Q and A Sunday • May 17 • 6 PM PST Click here on start your meeting or https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=mb896b9ec88bc4e1163cf4194c55b248f OR Join by phone: (855) 797-9485 Meeting Number (Access Code): 80
    2 points
  7. Hello Mary!! Thank you for replying!! It was a surprise for me having a relapse... I never knew or even heard it could happen... but last year I began to feel sooooo bad... and as I’ve had so many difficulties with the doctors I consulted the first time (I visited 40 doctors in ten years ... and only 3 of them understood my symptoms)... I decided to go to the laboratory by myself and asked them to perform the tests I thought I might have needed. And so I saw the cortisol beginning to increase ... but this January I presented a tachyarrhytmia sincope and although cardiologists i
    2 points
  8. Hello Mary & dear Cushies!! I’ve just discovered this article two months ago and I was very pleased to speak directly to Dr. Gerardo Burton. He and his team developed a drug (21OH-6OP) which is a SPECIFIC antagonist for cortisol receptors, unlikely mifepristone which inhibits cortisol AND progesterone with so many undesired adverse effects. Unfortunately the pharmaceutical company didn’t choose this drug to start the clinical trials and so it is resting in Dr. Burton’s lab.... since 2007. The great humanity in Dr. Burton drop tears into my eyes when he told me that he w
    2 points
  9. Thank you so much, Mayela - I'll definitely check this out. We need all the help we can get and I'm glad that Dr. Burton is trying to help Cushing's patients. 13 years is a long time to withhold a potentially helpful drug. I'm so sorry you're having a relapse Are you planning another pituitary surgery, BLA or something else?
    2 points
  10. Cushing syndrome, a rare endocrine disorder caused by abnormally excessive amounts of the hormone cortisol, has a new pharmaceutical treatment to treat cortisol overproduction. Osilodrostat (Isturisa) is the first FDA approved drug who either can’t undergo pituitary gland surgery or have undergone the surgery but still have the disease. The oral tablet functions by blocking the enzyme responsible for cortisol synthesis, 11-beta-hydroxylase. “Until now, patients in need of medications…have had few approved options, either with limited efficacy or with too many adverse effects. With this d
    2 points
  11. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Isturisa (osilodrostat) oral tablets for adults with Cushing's disease who either cannot undergo pituitary gland surgery or have undergone the surgery but still have the disease. Cushing's disease is a rare disease in which the adrenal glands make too much of the cortisol hormone. Isturisa is the first FDA-approved drug to directly address this cortisol overproduction by blocking the enzyme known as 11-beta-hydroxylase and preventing cortisol synthesis. "The FDA supports the development of safe and effective treatments for rare diseases
    2 points
  12. https://doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.4033 ABSTRACT Endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a rare cause of secondary osteoporosis. The long‐term consequences for bone metabolism after successful surgical treatment remain largely unknown. We assessed bone mineral density and fracture rates in 89 patients with confirmed Cushing's syndrome at the time of diagnosis and 2 years after successful tumor resection. We determined five bone turnover markers at the time of diagnosis, 1 and 2 years postoperatively. The bone turnover markers osteocalcin, intact procollagen‐IN‐propeptide
    1 point
  13. A retrospective cohort study was performed to compare mortality risk and causes of death in adrenal insufficiency with an individually-matched reference population. Researchers examined 6,821 patients with adrenal insufficiency (primary, 2052; secondary, 3948) and 6,7564 individually-matched controls (primary, 20366; secondary, 39134). It was shown that in adrenal insufficiency, mortality was elevated, particularly primary, even with individual matching, and was found early in the disease course. The data demonstrated that cardiovascular disease was the major cause but mortalit
    1 point
  14. It's because desmopressin stimulates ACTH release in corticotrophs (normal cells) and in corticotrophinomas, i.e., tumor cells in the case of Cushing's disease. This effect has been shown to be higher in CD than in non-CD patients. However, I think the ability of the DDAVP test to discriminate between CD and non-CD is questionable, although I'm not too familiar with that area of the literature. What does your MRI say?
    1 point
  15. The cancer medicine bexarotene may hold promise for treating Cushing’s disease, a study suggests. The study, “Targeting the TR4 nuclear receptor with antagonist bexarotene can suppress the proopiomelanocortin signalling in AtT‐20 cells,” was published in the Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine. Cushing’s disease is caused by a tumor on the pituitary gland, leading this gland to produce too much adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Excess ACTH causes the adrenal glands to release too much of the stress hormone cortisol; abnormally high cortisol levels are primarily responsible f
    1 point
  16. Dr. Theodore Friedman will host a webinar on COVID-19 Vaccines for Endocrine Patients Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including: How do the vaccines work? What did the New England Journal of Medicine article say about the Pfizer vaccine? What are the different vaccine options? What are the side effects? Who should and shouldn’t get a vaccine? What about Dr. Friedman’s vaccine studies? Sunday • December 27 • 6 PM PST Click here on start your meeting or https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=m5085619c25d8a2417d9316b5
    1 point
  17. From message board member @sharm - Sharmyn McGraw: Hi All, I hope you can join us on Zoom this Saturday, Nov. 14, 2020 starting at 9:00 a.m. (PST). For those that can't make it, I will record the meeting and post it later on our Facebook page. I look forward to seeing you! Contact @sharm if you have questions or email her here: pituitarybuddy@hotmail.com
    1 point
  18. Generally overweight people have weight everywhere and don't get a buffalo hump. Please don't give up! I know it's hard to get a diagnosis but definitely worthwhile.
    1 point
  19. Health Condition: All Conditions Demographics: Ages 18+, United States Resident Special Request(s): Everyone who has taken part in a clinical trial is asked to share. We are interested in learning why you decided to take part in a clinical trial and how your experience went. Honoraria: Some respondents may be asked to participate in a clinical trial awareness network where there are paid opportunities to tell their stories. Apply to learn more.
    1 point
  20. Michael P Catalino 1 2, David M Meredith 3 4, Umberto De Girolami 3 4, Sherwin Tavakol 1 5, Le Min 6, Edward R Laws 1 4 Affiliations expand PMID: 32886921 DOI: 10.3171/2020.5.JNS201514 Abstract Objective: This study was done to compare corticotroph hyperplasia and histopathologically proven adenomas in patients with Cushing disease by analyzing diagnostic features, surgical management, and clinical outcomes. Methods: Patients with suspected pituitary Cushing disease were included in a retrospective cohort study and were excluded if results of patho
    1 point
  21. Adults with adrenal insufficiency who are adequately treated and trained display the same incidence of COVID-19-suggestive symptoms and disease severity as controls, according to a presenter. “Adrenal insufficiency is supposed to be associated with an increased risk for infections and complications,” Giulia Carosi, a doctoral student in the department of experimental medicine at Sapienza University of Rome, said during a presentation at the virtual European Congress of Endocrinology Annual Meeting. “Our aim was to evaluate the incidence of COVID symptoms and related complications in this
    1 point
  22. Dr. Friedman prescribes various thyroid hormone preparations to his patients with hypothyroidism. This includes natural desiccated thyroid (NDT) of which two preparations are WP Thyroid and Nature-Throid, both made by RLC Labs. On August 25, 2020, RLC Labs announced a voluntary, consumer-level recall of all lots of Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid tablets because some lots contain less than the required 90% of the active ingredient as determined by the FDA. The RLC spokesperson said to Dr. Friedman that one lot of WP Thyroid and 5 lots of Nature-Throid contained between 87% and 90% of the labeled
    1 point
  23. Osilodrostat treatment was found to be associated with a rapid and sustained reduction in mean concentration of urinary free cortisol (UFC) and improved clinical symptoms in patients with Cushing’s disease, according to the results of a prospective, multicenter, open-label, phase 3 study published in the Lancet Diabetes Endocrinology. Osilodrostat is an oral inhibitor of 11-β hydroxylase cytochrome P450. Adults aged 18 to 75 years of age with diagnosed persistent or recurrent Cushing’s disease were recruited between 2014 and 2017 at 66 hospitals in 19 countries. Cushing’s disease was defi
    1 point
  24. Susanne, this is not a blog. It is a message board about Cushing's Syndrome and Disease. I would suggest you do a google search for how to write blog posts.
    1 point
  25. Study Authors: Tsung-Chieh Yao, Ya-Wen Huang, et al.; Beth I. Wallace, Akbar K. Waljee Target Audience and Goal Statement: Primary care physicians, rheumatologists, pulmonologists, dermatologists, gastroenterologists, cardiologists The goal of this study was to examine the associations between oral corticosteroid bursts and severe adverse events among adults in Taiwan. Question Addressed: What were the associations between steroid bursts and severe adverse events, specifically gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, sepsis, and heart failure? Study Synopsis and Perspective:
    1 point
  26. Wow 8.4 on the first try. These are textbook adrenal numbers. I hope your doctors come to their senses.
    1 point
  27. Dr. Theodore Friedman (The Wiz) will host a webinar on Growth Hormone Deficiency, PCOS or Cushing’s: How do You Tell Them Apart? Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including: Signs and Symptoms of Cushing’s Syndrome Testing for Cushing’s Signs and Symptoms of Growth Hormone Deficiency Testing for Growth Hormone Deficiency Signs and Symptoms of PCOS Testing for PCOS How do you tell them apart? Sunday • August 2 • 6 PM PDT Click here on start your meeting or https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=m4eda0c468071bd
    1 point
  28. Abstract Despite various approaches to immunoassay and chromatography for monitoring cortisol concentrations, conventional methods require bulky external equipment, which limits their use as mobile health care systems. Here, we describe a human pilot trial of a soft, smart contact lens for real-time detection of the cortisol concentration in tears using a smartphone. A cortisol sensor formed using a graphene field-effect transistor can measure cortisol concentration with a detection limit of 10 pg/ml, which is low enough to detect the cortisol concentration in human tears. In addition,
    1 point
  29. Presented by Georgios A. Zenonos, MD Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery Associate Director, Center for Skull Base Surgery University of Pittsburgh Medical Center 200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh PA, 15217 Presbyterian Hospital, Suite B400 No Registration is Required. It will be webcast by Microsoft Teams. Click here to attend. Date: Friday, July 17, 2020 Time: 10:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time, 1:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
    1 point
  30. Sorry, I'm the original poster before I joined :). Once I made an account I changed name.
    1 point
  31. I've managed to move up some appointments. As stated my Serum Cortisol test about 4:30pm didn't show anything abnormal. My ultrasound confirmed its not a Lipoma but didn't confirm it was anything at all to my knowledge. What test should I request at my 8am appointment this Fri? PM Saliva, 24 Urine, dexamethasone? I guess I'm already expecting this PA to be skeptical based on others experiences. Thanks!
    1 point
  32. Thank you so much for sharing your dad's story, Andy. What a sad, difficult one it is. I know when Dr. Cushing was originally testing people for Cushing's disease, he found some of his early patients in the circus (bearded woman, etc) and other patients have been in mental wards before their diagnosis. This disease, especially untreated, can really cause havoc in all aspects of a person's life. I hope you and your family have been able to find some peace since the original article.
    1 point
  33. J Clin Endocrinol Metab . 2003 Apr;88(4):1554-8. doi: 10.1210/jc.2002-021518. Francesca Pecori Giraldi 1, Mirella Moro, Francesco Cavagnini, Study Group on the Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis of the Italian Society of Endocrinology Affiliations PMID: 12679438 DOI: 10.1210/jc.2002-021518 Abstract Cushing's disease (CD) presents a marked female preponderance, but whether this skewed gender distribution has any relevance to the presentation and outcome of CD is not kn
    1 point
  34. First published:03 May 2020 Read the entire article at https://doi.org/10.1002/alr.22540 Potential conflict of interest: None disclosed. Presented at the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Rhinologic Society, on September 14, 2019, in New Orleans, LA. Abstract Background Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery (ETS) for the resection of pituitary adenoma has become more common throughout the past decade. Although most patients have a short postoperative hospitalization, others require a more prol
    1 point
  35. Presented by Nelson M. Oyesiku, MD, PhD, FACS Professor of Neurosurgery and Medicine Vice-Chairman, Neurosurgery Residency Program Director Emory University School of Medicine Register Now! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. Date: Sunday, May 10, 2020 Time: 11:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time to 12:15 PM Pacific Daylight Time/ 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time
    1 point
  36. 1 point
  37. Here's another answer I got:
    1 point
  38. I asked some other Cushies I know and got this answer so far:
    1 point
  39. With the novel COVID-19 virus continuing to spread, it is crucial to adhere to the advice from experts and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to help reduce risk of infection for individuals and the population at large. This is particularly important for people with adrenal insufficiency and people with uncontrolled Cushing’s Syndrome. Studies have reported that individuals with adrenal insufficiency have an increased rate of respiratory infection-related deaths, possibly due to impaired immune function. As such, people with adrenal insufficiency should observe the follo
    1 point
  40. Along with all of you, NADF is monitoring this outbreak by paying close attention to CDC and FDA updates. We have also asked our Medical Advisor to help answer your important questions as they come up. We asked Medical Director Paul Margulies, MD, FACE, FACP to help us with this question: Question: Does Adrenal Insufficiency cause us to have a weakened immune system and therefore make us more susceptible? Response: Individuals with adrenal insufficiency on replacement doses of glucocorticoids do not have a suppressed immune system. The autoimmune mechanism that causes Addison’s
    1 point
  41. Kathy, I would put your story on face book and tell all your friends to pass it along to their friends, and their friends, etc. Be sure to mention Kaiser. I'm sure someone will pick up on your dilemma. I went through a similar battle getting my condition diagnosed. Thank God my Endocrinologist was one of the best and insisted on an IPSS test after my MRI was negative. This led to pituitary surgery by a Neurosurgeon from the Cleveland Clinic. Best in the nation and true lifesavers in my book. You cannot give up. You (or your son) must take control of his health and insist, insist, insist, on g
    1 point
  42. I have Kaiser in VA. After 2 high 24 hour cortisol tests, my endocrinologist referred me to NIH. I am not sure that Kaiser has the expertise in house to effectively diagnose and treat Cushings. That said, my Kaiser accupuncturist is the one who tested my DHEA, which was nonexistent and referred me to the endocrinologist. Maybe he could contact my endocrinologist at Kaiser and see what he says - Dr T Lee in Falls Church, VA. NIH treatment is free except for the transportation.
    1 point
  43. How sad. He never got to know life after Cushings, either.
    1 point
  44. Thanks for posting this Robin. The poor unfortunate man and his family - it is dreadful. And so very descriptive - makes you wish you could have been there for him to help.
    1 point
  45. Boy Oh Boy this one scares the H- E DOUBLE TOOTHPICKS out of me, it hits so close to MY home! Lisa I think I will wear the Xtra gear this week!
    1 point
  46. Thanks for sharing this story Robin. Kinda tugs on the ol' strings doesn't it.
    1 point
  47. Man oh man . . . . . when will they ever get it. It is so sad and scary to read of such a tragedy. And to read his symptoms . . . . . boy does that hit home. Thanks for posting Robin. Amy
    1 point
  48. This must be so devastating for his family, but I'm glad they are bringing this disease to public view. It makes me more thankful that I saw a GP who was able to put all my symptoms together & immediately referred me. This is not always the case over here. Most GP's treat symptoms, they do not look for an underlying cause, that's the way it is over here, they are constantly under pressure to reduce the costs to the NHS, so any referral to a specialist has to be for a DAMNED GOOD REASON! For diagnosis they look for the lowest common denominator, this goes for all diseases, the simp
    1 point
  49. Robin--- What a heart-breaking experience for the family to have to endure---but how courageous of them to share it with others. One of the passages---"He used to say he felt like he was in a bubble where everything he did inside it seemed to be normal but to everyone outside the bubble he appeared to be losing his mind." really hit me like a ton of bricks---this is the best description of something that happened to me a couple of times... If and when I ever get a diagnosis, I'm sending a copy of this article to my "former" doctors, who did not and could not help me w
    1 point
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