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  1. How stressed are you? Your earwax could hold the answer. A new method of collecting and analyzing earwax for levels of the stress hormone cortisol may be a simple and cheap way to track the mental health of people with depression and anxiety. Cortisol is a crucial hormone that spikes when a person is stressed and declines when they're relaxed. In the short-term, the hormone is responsible for the "fight or flight" response, so it's important for survival. But cortisol is often consistently elevated in people with depression and anxiety, and persistent high levels of cortisol can have
    3 points
  2. WASHINGTON--Endogenous Cushing's syndrome, a rare hormonal disorder, is associated with a threefold increase in death, primarily due to cardiovascular disease and infection, according to a study whose results will be presented at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting. The research, according to the study authors, is the largest systematic review and meta-analysis to date of studies of endogenous (meaning "inside your body") Cushing's syndrome. Whereas Cushing's syndrome most often results from external factors--taking cortisol-like medications such as prednisone--the endoge
    2 points
  3. Context Late-night salivary cortisol (LNSC) measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA-F) is a first-line screening test for Cushing’s syndrome (CS) with a reported sensitivity and specificity of >90%. However, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, validated to measure salivary cortisol (LCMS-F) and cortisone (LCMS-E), has been proposed to be superior diagnostically. Objective, Setting, and Main Outcome Measures Prospectively evaluate the diagnostic performance of EIA-F, LCMS-F, and LCMS-E in 1453 consecutive late-night saliva samples from 705 patients
    2 points
  4. Presented by Georgios A. Zenonos, MD Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery Associate Director, Center for Skull Base Surgery University of Pittsburgh Medical Center 200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh PA, 15217 Presbyterian Hospital, Suite B400 Register Now! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. Date: Wednesday July 1, 2020 Time: 3:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time, 6:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
    2 points
  5. Unfortunately a 4:30 pm cortisol test can't be used to diagnose or exclude Cushing's. The only useful blood measurement for cortisol would be a midnight one. You really need to do a 24 hour urinary cortisol test.
    2 points
  6. Welcome, Ellie. I can't image how hard it would be to get a diagnosis (or not!) during these COVID times. Unfortunately, results from blood tests aren't going to be the answer - just a part of an answer. You need to get UFCs (urine free cortisol) Do you need to get a referral to an endo? They are the best to diagnose Cushing's - if you get one who is familar with testing. That's the important part. Not all endos "believe in Cushing's" which is incredible to me. Unfortunately, there's no real way of speeding a Cushing's diagnosis along. And, I don't think you'd want to
    2 points
  7. Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including: Who should get an adrenalectomy? How do you optimally replace adrenal hormones? What laboratory tests are needed to monitor replacement? When and how do you stress dose? What about subcut cortisol versus cortisol pumps? Patient Melissa will lead a Q and A Sunday • May 17 • 6 PM PST Click here on start your meeting or https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=mb896b9ec88bc4e1163cf4194c55b248f OR Join by phone: (855) 797-9485 Meeting Number (Access Code): 80
    2 points
  8. Hello Mary!! Thank you for replying!! It was a surprise for me having a relapse... I never knew or even heard it could happen... but last year I began to feel sooooo bad... and as I’ve had so many difficulties with the doctors I consulted the first time (I visited 40 doctors in ten years ... and only 3 of them understood my symptoms)... I decided to go to the laboratory by myself and asked them to perform the tests I thought I might have needed. And so I saw the cortisol beginning to increase ... but this January I presented a tachyarrhytmia sincope and although cardiologists i
    2 points
  9. Hello Mary & dear Cushies!! I’ve just discovered this article two months ago and I was very pleased to speak directly to Dr. Gerardo Burton. He and his team developed a drug (21OH-6OP) which is a SPECIFIC antagonist for cortisol receptors, unlikely mifepristone which inhibits cortisol AND progesterone with so many undesired adverse effects. Unfortunately the pharmaceutical company didn’t choose this drug to start the clinical trials and so it is resting in Dr. Burton’s lab.... since 2007. The great humanity in Dr. Burton drop tears into my eyes when he told me that he w
    2 points
  10. Thank you so much, Mayela - I'll definitely check this out. We need all the help we can get and I'm glad that Dr. Burton is trying to help Cushing's patients. 13 years is a long time to withhold a potentially helpful drug. I'm so sorry you're having a relapse Are you planning another pituitary surgery, BLA or something else?
    2 points
  11. Donkey, I am so sorry to read all that you've been through. Getting a Cushing's diagnosis is the worst, especially when doctors don't believe us. You didn't know what kind of doctor you have that doubts you have Cushing's but it sounds like you need another. Your best choice would be an endocrinologist who has had other Cushing's patients. Even though you aren't obese with striae...not every person has every symptom. The only way to diagnose Cushing's is with testing, not by a list of symptoms. Best of luck to you. I hope you keep us posted on your progress!
    1 point
  12. Excess mortality among people with endogenous Cushing syndrome (CS) has declined in the past 20 years yet remains three times higher than in the general population, new research finds. Among more than 90,000 individuals with endogenous CS, the overall proportion of mortality ― defined as the ratio of the number of deaths from CS divided by the total number of CS patients ― was 0.05, and the standardized mortality rate was an "unacceptable" three times that of the general population, Padiporn Limumpornpetch, MD, reported on March 20 at ENDO 2021: The Endocrine Society Annual Meeting.
    1 point
  13. Zarina Brady, Aoife Garrahy, Claire Carthy, Michael W. O’Reilly, Christopher J. Thompson, Mark Sherlock, Amar Agha & Mohsen Javadpour BMC Endocrine Disorders volume 21, Article number: 36 (2021) Cite this article 160 Accesses Metricsdetails Abstract Background Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) to resect an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma is the first-line treatment for Cushing’s disease (CD), wi
    1 point
  14. There is an absence of online information regarding the risks of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) testing for patients with a history of sinus and/or pituitary surgery, according to a research letter published online March 4 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. Noting that blind NPS testing poses a risk to patients with sinus pathology, Taylor Fish, from the University of Texas Health San Antonio, and colleagues examined online preoperative and postoperative patient information regarding the potential risks of SARS-CoV-2 NPS
    1 point
  15. A retrospective cohort study was performed to compare mortality risk and causes of death in adrenal insufficiency with an individually-matched reference population. Researchers examined 6,821 patients with adrenal insufficiency (primary, 2052; secondary, 3948) and 6,7564 individually-matched controls (primary, 20366; secondary, 39134). It was shown that in adrenal insufficiency, mortality was elevated, particularly primary, even with individual matching, and was found early in the disease course. The data demonstrated that cardiovascular disease was the major cause but mortalit
    1 point
  16. It's because desmopressin stimulates ACTH release in corticotrophs (normal cells) and in corticotrophinomas, i.e., tumor cells in the case of Cushing's disease. This effect has been shown to be higher in CD than in non-CD patients. However, I think the ability of the DDAVP test to discriminate between CD and non-CD is questionable, although I'm not too familiar with that area of the literature. What does your MRI say?
    1 point
  17. The cancer medicine bexarotene may hold promise for treating Cushing’s disease, a study suggests. The study, “Targeting the TR4 nuclear receptor with antagonist bexarotene can suppress the proopiomelanocortin signalling in AtT‐20 cells,” was published in the Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine. Cushing’s disease is caused by a tumor on the pituitary gland, leading this gland to produce too much adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Excess ACTH causes the adrenal glands to release too much of the stress hormone cortisol; abnormally high cortisol levels are primarily responsible f
    1 point
  18. Abstract Cushing's syndrome is a rare entity in children. Adrenal tumour is the common cause of this syndrome in young children, whereas, iatrogenic causes are more common among older children. We report a 4 year old male child diagnosed with Cushing syndrome due to a right adrenal adenoma; the child presented with obesity and increase distribution of body hair. After thorough investigation and control of hypertension and dyselectrolytemia, right adrenalectomy was performed. The patient had good clinical recovery with weight loss and biochemical resolution of Cushing's syndrome.
    1 point
  19. Researchers conducted this retrospective cohort study to investigate acute and life-threatening complications in patients with active Cushing syndrome (CS). Participants in the study were 242 patients with CS, including 213 with benign CS (pituitary n = 101, adrenal n = 99, ectopic n = 13), and 29 with malignant disease. In patients with benign pituitary CS, the prevalence of acute complications was 62%, 40% in patients with benign adrenal CS, and 100% in patients with ectopic CS. Infections, thromboembolic events, hypokalemia, hypertensive crises, cardiac arrhythmias and acute coronary events
    1 point
  20. A young healthcare worker who contracted COVID-19 shortly after being diagnosed with Cushing’s disease was detailed in a case report from Japan. While the woman was successfully treated for both conditions, Cushing’s may worsen a COVID-19 infection. Prompt treatment and multidisciplinary care is required for Cushing’s patients who get COVID-19, its researchers said. The report, “Successful management of a patient with active Cushing’s disease complicated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia,” was published in Endocrine Journal. Cushing’s disease i
    1 point
  21. Dr. Theodore Friedman will host a webinar on COVID-19 Vaccines for Endocrine Patients Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including: How do the vaccines work? What did the New England Journal of Medicine article say about the Pfizer vaccine? What are the different vaccine options? What are the side effects? Who should and shouldn’t get a vaccine? What about Dr. Friedman’s vaccine studies? Sunday • December 27 • 6 PM PST Click here on start your meeting or https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=m5085619c25d8a2417d9316b5
    1 point
  22. Dr. Theodore Friedman will host a webinar on COVID-19 Vaccines for Endocrine Patients Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including: How do the vaccines work? What did the New England Journal of Medicine article say about the Pfizer vaccine? What are the different vaccine options? What are the side effects? Who should and shouldn’t get a vaccine? What about Dr. Friedman’s vaccine studies? Sunday • December 27 • 6 PM PST Click here on start your meeting or https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=m5085619c25d8a2417d9316b5
    1 point
  23. From message board member @sharm - Sharmyn McGraw: Hi All, I hope you can join us on Zoom this Saturday, Nov. 14, 2020 starting at 9:00 a.m. (PST). For those that can't make it, I will record the meeting and post it later on our Facebook page. I look forward to seeing you! Contact @sharm if you have questions or email her here: pituitarybuddy@hotmail.com
    1 point
  24. The treatment of adrenal insufficiency with hydrocortisone granules in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) was associated with an absence of adrenal crises and normal growth patterns over a 2-year period, according to study findings published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. The study included a total of 17 children with CAH and 1 child with hypopituitarism. All included participants were <6 years old who were receiving current adrenocortical replacement therapy, including hydrocortisone with or without fludrocortisone. Hydrocortisone medications
    1 point
  25. Generally overweight people have weight everywhere and don't get a buffalo hump. Please don't give up! I know it's hard to get a diagnosis but definitely worthwhile.
    1 point
  26. This is a remarkable paper and has big implications for testing and the diagnostic algorithm, especially given who the authors are. The blunt takeaway is do not use salivary cortisol for adrenal Cushing's because it doesn't work. They recommend dex test instead but we know that test has problems too--yes, even in adrenal cases. It's not clear to me if this is generalizable to all mild Cushing's, nor does it appear like cyclical or episodic Cushing's was considered. The other thing is that the technically "better" assay (LCMS) has worse sensitivity than the older, cheaper one (EIA). This is the
    1 point
  27. Abnormally high levels of cortisol in the urine — one of the hallmarks of Cushing’s syndrome — seem to be associated with alterations in blood sugar metabolism in obese patients, a study found. The study, “Hypercortisolism and altered glucose homeostasis in obese patients in the pre-bariatric surgery assessment,” was published in the journal Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews.
    1 point
  28. Presented by Dr. Magge, Assistant Professor of Neurology at Weill Cornell Medical College and an Assistant Attending Neurologist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Dr. Ranakrishna, Chief of Neurological Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital, Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery at Avina and Willis Murphy at Weill Cornell Medicine Click here to attend. Date: Tuesday, October 13, 2020 Time: 10:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time Learning objectives: - the basic characteristics of the different types of pituitary adenomas -
    1 point
  29. Health Condition: All Conditions Demographics: Ages 18+, United States Resident Special Request(s): Everyone who has taken part in a clinical trial is asked to share. We are interested in learning why you decided to take part in a clinical trial and how your experience went. Honoraria: Some respondents may be asked to participate in a clinical trial awareness network where there are paid opportunities to tell their stories. Apply to learn more.
    1 point
  30. Michael P Catalino 1 2, David M Meredith 3 4, Umberto De Girolami 3 4, Sherwin Tavakol 1 5, Le Min 6, Edward R Laws 1 4 Affiliations expand PMID: 32886921 DOI: 10.3171/2020.5.JNS201514 Abstract Objective: This study was done to compare corticotroph hyperplasia and histopathologically proven adenomas in patients with Cushing disease by analyzing diagnostic features, surgical management, and clinical outcomes. Methods: Patients with suspected pituitary Cushing disease were included in a retrospective cohort study and were excluded if results of patho
    1 point
  31. Carma, I removed the links from your post. I suggest you try spamming elsewhere.
    1 point
  32. Susanne, this is not a blog. It is a message board about Cushing's Syndrome and Disease. I would suggest you do a google search for how to write blog posts.
    1 point
  33. Wow 8.4 on the first try. These are textbook adrenal numbers. I hope your doctors come to their senses.
    1 point
  34. Hypercortisolism Quickly Reversed With Oral Tx Oral osilodrostat (Isturisa) normalized cortisol levels in Cushing's disease patients who were ineligible for or not cured with pituitary surgery, according to the phase III LINC 3 trial. After 24 weeks of open-label treatment with twice-daily osilodrostat, 53% of patients (72 of 137; 95% CI 43.9-61.1) were able to maintain a complete response -- marked by mean 24-hour urinary free cortisol concentration of the upper limit of normal or below -- without any uptitration in dosage after the initial 12-week buildup phase, reported Rosario Pi
    1 point
  35. This event has been postponed to Dec. 5, 2020 You are Cordially Invited! The PNA is pleased to announce our participation in this event! Saturday, December 5, 2020 8:30am – 4:30pm Zuckerman Research Center 417 E. 68th St. New York, NY Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Target Audience This course is intended for endocrinologists, neurosurgeons, otolaryngologists, radiation oncologists, neurologists, ophthalmologists, neuro-oncologists, family medicine and internal medicine physicians, physicians in training and other allied health professionals who treat and ma
    1 point
  36. Abstract Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the viral strain that has caused the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, has presented healthcare systems around the world with an unprecedented challenge. In locations with significant rates of viral transmission, social distancing measures and enforced ‘lockdowns’ are the new ‘norm’ as governments try to prevent healthcare services from being overwhelmed. However, with these measures have come important challenges for the delivery of existing services for other diseases and conditions. The clinica
    1 point
  37. Sorry, I'm the original poster before I joined :). Once I made an account I changed name.
    1 point
  38. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2213-8587(20)30215-1 Over the past few months, COVID-19, the pandemic disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, has been associated with a high rate of infection and lethality, especially in patients with comorbidities such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and immunodeficiency syndromes.1 These cardiometabolic and immune impairments are common comorbidities of Cushing's syndrome, a condition characterised by excessive exposure to endogenous glucocorticoids. In patients with Cushing's syndrome, the increased cardiovascu
    1 point
  39. Braun LT, Fazel J, Zopp S Journal of Bone and Mineral Research | May 22, 2020 This study was attempted to assess bone mineral density and fracture rates in 89 patients with confirmed Cushing's syndrome at the time of diagnosis and 2 years after successful tumor resection. Researchers ascertained five bone turnover markers at the time of diagnosis, 1 and 2 years postoperatively. Via chemiluminescent immunoassays, they assessed bone turnover markers osteocalcin, intact procollagen‐IN‐propeptide, alkaline bo
    1 point
  40. Those are all definitely symptoms of Cushing's...and excess cortisol. I think I had every one of them while I was being diagnosed. Have you taken steroids, especially often? They can cause these symptoms. Definitely mention these symptoms to your doctor. Please keep us posted.
    1 point
  41. Presented by Jamie J. Van Gompel, M.D., B.S., Professor in Neurosurgery and Otolaryngology specializing in endoscopic/open skull base focusing on Pituitary tumors as well as Epilepsy at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, USA and Garret W. Choby, M.D., a fellowship-trained rhinologist and endoscopic skull base surgeon practicing at the Mayo Clinic. Objectives: - Understand the additional considerations that are key to performing endonasal surgery during the COVID pandemic - Identify the practice changes that are allowing pituitary surgery to proceed
    1 point
  42. Presented by Nelson M. Oyesiku, MD, PhD, FACS Professor of Neurosurgery and Medicine Vice-Chairman, Neurosurgery Residency Program Director Emory University School of Medicine Register Now! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. Date: Sunday, May 10, 2020 Time: 11:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time to 12:15 PM Pacific Daylight Time/ 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time
    1 point
  43. Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including: Who should get an adrenalectomy? How do you optimally replace adrenal hormones? What laboratory tests are needed to monitor replacement? When and how do you stress dose? What about subcut cortisol versus cortisol pumps? Patient Melissa will lead a Q and A Sunday • May 17 • 6 PM PST Click here on start your meeting or https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=mb896b9ec88bc4e1163cf4194c55b248f OR Join by phone: (855) 797-9485 Meeting Number (Access Code): 802 84
    1 point
  44. Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including: Who should get an adrenalectomy? How do you optimally replace adrenal hormones? What laboratory tests are needed to monitor replacement? When and how do you stress dose? What about subcut cortisol versus cortisol pumps? Patient Melissa will lead a Q and A Sunday • May 17 • 6 PM PST Click here on start your meeting or https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=mb896b9ec88bc4e1163cf4194c55b248f OR Join by phone: (855) 797-9485 Meeting Number (Access Code): 802 84
    1 point
  45. MK---I think things are much the same way here---the doctor's look for the obvious---and just treat the symptoms---which doesn't always save any of us money...sadly, some pay with their lives---as you've indicated. Healthy people are productive people---that should be what we're aiming for...not trying to save a nickel...
    1 point
  46. Thanks for sharing this story... although it is so sad!! Especially when we know something could have helped this man so much sooner. Thanks for sharing!! I guess even though these stories are awful to read, they spread awareness... which is exactly what we need... Paige
    1 point
  47. Man oh man . . . . . when will they ever get it. It is so sad and scary to read of such a tragedy. And to read his symptoms . . . . . boy does that hit home. Thanks for posting Robin. Amy
    1 point
  48. Wow, What a heart wrenching story. I think we all must have a double dose of empathy when we read about the trials of another cushings patient. I agree that publishing the story will really help raise awareness. It also makes me even more resolved to fight and encourage others to fight diligently to get a diagnosis and treatment plan as soon as possible!!!! Time is not our friend with this disease! Gina
    1 point
  49. This must be so devastating for his family, but I'm glad they are bringing this disease to public view. It makes me more thankful that I saw a GP who was able to put all my symptoms together & immediately referred me. This is not always the case over here. Most GP's treat symptoms, they do not look for an underlying cause, that's the way it is over here, they are constantly under pressure to reduce the costs to the NHS, so any referral to a specialist has to be for a DAMNED GOOD REASON! For diagnosis they look for the lowest common denominator, this goes for all diseases, the simp
    1 point
  50. Robin--- What a heart-breaking experience for the family to have to endure---but how courageous of them to share it with others. One of the passages---"He used to say he felt like he was in a bubble where everything he did inside it seemed to be normal but to everyone outside the bubble he appeared to be losing his mind." really hit me like a ton of bricks---this is the best description of something that happened to me a couple of times... If and when I ever get a diagnosis, I'm sending a copy of this article to my "former" doctors, who did not and could not help me w
    1 point
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