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An investigational therapy improved quality of life and reduced disease symptoms for patients with endogenous Cushing's syndrome, according to new findings from the phase III SONICS study.

Patients taking oral levoketoconazole twice daily had significant reductions in mean scores for acne (-1.8), peripheral edema (-0.4), and hirsutism (-2.6), all secondary endpoints of the pivotal trial (P<0.03 for all), reported Maria Fleseriu, MD, of Oregon Health and Science University in Portland.

"We're looking forward to see the results of further studies and to add this therapy to the landscape of Cushing's," Fleseriu said here during a presentation of the findings at AACE 2019, the annual meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. "We have a newer medication and still we cannot make a dent in the outcomes of Cushing's, especially for patient-reported outcomes."

Free testosterone levels significantly decreased in women taking levoketoconazole (a ketoconazole stereoisomer and potent steroidogenesis inhibitor), from an average of 0.32 ng/dL down to 0.12 ng/dL (0.011 to 0.004 nmol/L, P<0.0001). Men had a non-significant increase: 5.1 ng/dL up to 5.8 ng/dL (0.177 to 0.202 nmol/L).

There were no significant changes from baseline to the end of maintenance for other secondary endpoints in the analysis: moon facies, facial plethora, striae, bruising, supraclavicular fat, irregular menstruation, and dysmenorrhea. However, significant improvements after 6 months of therapy were seen in patient-reported quality of life compared with baseline (mean 10.6 change on the Cushing QOL questionnaire) as well as a significant reduction in depressive symptoms (mean -4.3 change on the Beck Depression Inventory II).

The open-label, multicenter SONICS (Study of Levoketoconazole in Cushing's Syndrome) trial included 94 adult men and women with a confirmed diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome and elevated 24-hour mean urinary free cortisol (mUFC) levels...
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Corcept Therapeutics is recruiting participants for its Phase 3 clinical trial evaluating relacorilant as a potential treatment for Cushing’s syndrome-related side effects such as high blood pressure and impaired glucose tolerance.

Also, findings from the study “A Randomized-Withdrawal, Placebo-Controlled, Phase 3 Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist, Relacorilant, in Patients with Cushing Syndrome (GRACE Study),” were presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Endocrine Society (ENDO), in New Orleans, Louisiana.

In endogenous Cushing’s syndrome there is an “internal” culprit — usually a benign tumor — that makes the body produce too much of the hormone cortisol. The excessive amount of circulating cortisol can lead to serious problems, such as type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure.

...

Researchers plan to enroll 130 people in these U.S. cities: Indianapolis, Indiana; Metairie, Louisiana; Jackson, Mississippi; Albany, New York; Jamaica, New York; Wilmington, North Carolina; Miami, Florida; Summerville, South Carolina; El Paso, Texas; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and; Aurora, Colorado. More detailed information is available here.
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The use of an insulin pump to deliver continuous pulsatile cortisol may be a viable treatment option in patients with severe adrenal insufficiency who are unresponsive to oral corticosteroids, according to study results presented at the 28th Annual Congress of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, held April 24 to 28, 2019, in Los Angeles, California.

According to the investigators, increasing oral steroid doses may be required to prevent adrenal crisis in patients with adrenal insufficiency. However, in light of the associated side effects of long-term use of steroids, an alternative treatment method is needed. Insulin pumps, typically used to treat patients with diabetes, can be used to deliver steroids and may provide symptom control, prevent adrenal crisis, and lower required corticosteroid dose.

The current study enrolled patients with adrenal insufficiency who could not absorb oral corticosteroid treatment or were not responding to treatment. Of 118 patients with adrenal insufficiency, 6 patients were switched to pump treatment.

The results indicated that the use of cortisol pumps was associated with a 78.5% risk reduction for adrenal crisis compared with oral corticosteroids. As hydrocortisone dose was gradually tapered using the cortisol pump, there was a mean dose reduction of 62.77 mg compared with oral corticosteroid therapy.

The researchers noted that in addition to reducing the number of adrenal crises, use of a cortisol pump was found to be associated with better symptom control and quality of life.

“Continuous pulsatile cortisol replacement via pump is an option for management of severe adrenal insufficiency in patients unresponsive to oral therapy,” concluded the researchers.


From https://www.endocrinologyadvisor.com/home/conference-highlights/aace-2019/cortisol-pumps-may-be-viable-option-to-reduce-adrenal-crisis-in-severe-adrenal-insufficiency/
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Increased cortisol secretion may follow a cyclic pattern in patients with adrenal incidentalomas, a phenomenon that may lead to misdiagnosis, a study reports.

Since cyclic subclinical hypercortisolism may increase the risk for heart problems, researchers recommend extended follow-up with repeated tests to measure cortisol levels in these patients.

The study, “Cyclic Subclinical Hypercortisolism: A Previously Unidentified Hypersecretory Form of Adrenal Incidentalomas,” was published in the Journal of Endocrine Society.

Adrenal incidentalomas (AI) are asymptomatic masses in the adrenal glands discovered on an imaging test ordered for a problem unrelated to adrenal disease. While most of these benign tumors are considered non-functioning, meaning they do not produce steroid hormones like cortisol, up to 30% do produce and secrete steroids.

Subclinical Cushing’s syndrome is an asymptomatic condition characterized by mild cortisol excess without the specific signs of Cushing’s syndrome. The long-term exposure to excess cortisol may lead to cardiovascular problems in these patients.

While non-functioning adenomas have been linked with metabolic problems, guidelines say that if excess cortisol is ruled out after the first evaluation, patients no longer need additional follow-up.

However, cortisol secretion can be cyclic in Cushing’s syndrome, meaning that clinicians might not detect excess amounts of cortisol at first and misdiagnose patients.

In an attempt to determine whether cyclic cortisol production is also seen in patients with subclinical Cushing’s syndrome and whether these patients have a higher risk for metabolic complications, researchers in Brazil reviewed the medical records of 251 patients with AI — 186 women, median 60 years old — followed from 2006 to 2017 in a single reference center.

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Sharmyn McGraw searched for answers for seven years for whatever it was that was killing her; finally she diagnosed herself via the Internet with Cushing's disease, caused by a pituitary brain tumor. www.hormone411.org

Read Sharmyn's bio at https://cushingsbios.com/2019/03/16/sharmyn-in-the-media/
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In: Pituitary, ISSN 1386-341X, E-ISSN 1573-7403, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 179-186Article in journal (Refereed) Published

Abstract [en]

Background: Studies on the incidence of Cushing's disease (CD) are few and usually limited by a small number of patients. The aim of this study was to assess the annual incidence in a nationwide cohort of patients with presumed CD in Sweden.

Methods: Patients registered with a diagnostic code for Cushing's syndrome (CS) or CD, between 1987 and 2013 were identified in the Swedish National Patient Registry. The CD diagnosis was validated by reviewing clinical, biochemical, imaging, and histopathological data.

Results: Of 1317 patients identified, 534 (41%) had confirmed CD. One-hundred-and-fifty-six (12%) patients had other forms of CS, 41 (3%) had probable but unconfirmed CD, and 334 (25%) had diagnoses unrelated to CS. The mean (95% confidence interval) annual incidence between 1987 and 2013 of confirmed CD was 1.6 (1.4-1.8) cases per million. 1987-1995, 1996-2004, and 2005-2013, the mean annual incidence was 1.5 (1.1-1.8), 1.4 (1.0-1.7) and 2.0 (1.7-2.3) cases per million, respectively. During the last time period the incidence was higher than during the first and second time periods (P<0.05).

Conclusion: The incidence of CD in Sweden (1.6 cases per million) is in agreement with most previous reports. A higher incidence between 2005 and 2013 compared to 1987-2004 was noticed. Whether this reflects a truly increased incidence of the disease, or simply an increased awareness, earlier recognition, and earlier diagnosis can, however, not be answered. This study also illustrates the importance of validation of the diagnosis of CD in epidemiological research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages

SPRINGER , 2019. Vol. 22, no 2, p. 179-186

Keywords [en]

Cushing's syndrome, Epidemiology, Incidence, Validation
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In this video exclusive, Maria Fleseriu, MD, professor of neurological surgery and professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology, diabetes and clinical nutrition in the School of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University and director of the OHSU Northwest Pituitary Center, discusses management of hypopituitarism during pregnancy and an upcoming study of effects of growth hormone supplementation.

Successful in vitro fertilization and even natural pregnancy are possible for women with hypopituitarism, according to Fleseriu.

“Our job as endocrinologists is to make sure that we’re focusing on replacing all the pituitary hormones at the right level,” she said.

Fleseriu outlines considerations for assessing hormone levels and determining which should be supplemented — before, during and after pregnancy — for a healthy delivery and healthy baby. GH may be one of these, she said, despite its off-label use.
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NEW ORLEANS — The investigational drug osilodrostat (Novartis) continues to show promise for treating Cushing's disease, now with new phase 3 trial data.

The data from the phase 3, multicenter, double-blind randomized withdrawal study (LINC-3) of osilodrostat in 137 patients with Cushing's disease were presented here at ENDO 2019: The Endocrine Society Annual Meeting by Beverly M.K. Biller, MD, of the Neuroendocrine & Pituitary Tumor Center at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.

"Osilodrostat was effective and shows promise for the treatment of patients with Cushing's disease," Biller said.

Osilodrostat is an oral 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor, the enzyme that catalyzes the last step of cortisol biosynthesis in the adrenal cortex. Its mechanism of action is similar to that of the older Cushing's drug metyrapone, but osilodrostat has a longer plasma half-life and is more potent against 11β-hydroxylase.

Significantly more patients randomized to osilodrostat maintained a mean urinary free cortisol (mUFC) response versus placebo at 34 weeks following a 24-week open-label period plus 8-week randomized phase, with rapid and sustained mUFC reduction in most patients.

Patients also experienced improvements in clinical signs of hypercortisolism and quality of life. The drug was generally well-tolerated and had no unexpected side effects.
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Please be advised that this video contains graphic footage of surgery.

This video depicts an endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary approach for a patient with a non-functioning macroadenoma. The surgery was performed by Dr. Garret Choby (Otolaryngology) and Dr. Jamie Van Gompel (Neurosurgery).

 

 
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James Findling, MD, is a veteran of the endocrinology field, a clinical practitioner and a Cushing’s syndrome expert. For his efforts in these areas, particularly clinical practice, the Endocrine Society is honoring him with its Outstanding Clinical Practitioner Award at ENDO 2019 in New Orleans.

James Findling




Findling, who currently serves as director of community endocrinology services and clinical professor of medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, has made his clinical practice a national one as, according to the Endocrine Society, he receives referrals from across the U.S. In addition, he has played an important role in Cushing’s syndrome research, including breakthroughs that the Endocrine Society has incorporated into its own clinical practice guidelines.

In a conversation with Endocrine Today, Findling discussed his serendipitous entrance into endocrinology, his own experience with medical history and his dream of playing golf with Barack Obama.

What was the defining moment that led you to your field?

Findling: In 1977, I was a resident in internal medicine at what was then the Milwaukee County General Hospital, which doesn’t exist anymore. I did an endocrinology rotation, and my attending physician was James Cerletty, MD. Endocrinology was the farthest thing from my mind as something I would be interested in, but I was assigned to do this rotation and it changed my life. I thought, “Oh my goodness. This is fascinating.” Dr. Cerletty was a fabulous teacher and great mentor. The reason I chose endocrinology was because of that 1-month rotation. I had never done it previously, and I just fell in love with it. It was primarily because of this one man, who just died recently. He changed my life.
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The Stanford Pituitary Center invites patients with pituitary disease, their family and friends to Stanford's Pituitary Patient Education Day! 

May 18, 2019 at the Sheraton Palo Alto Hotel
625 El Camino Real
Palo Alto, CA 94301 
USA

Topics and Breakout Sessions:

Function of the pituitary gland


General review of pituitary tumors


Endoscopic endonasal surgery for pituitary tumors


Quality of life after endonasal surgery


Radiation therapy for pituitary tumors


Cushing's Disease, prolactinoma, and acromegaly


Hypopituitarism therapy and growth hormone deficiency



Speakers:

Olivia Chu, NP, Nurse Practitioner


Robert Dodd, MD, Associate Professor of Neurosurgery


Juan Fernandez-Miranda, MD, Professor of Neurosurgery


Andrew Hoffman, MD, Professor of Medicine


Peter Hwang, MD, Professor of Otolaryngology


Laurence Katznelson, MD, Professor of Neurosurgery and Medicine


Erin Wolff, NP, Nurse Practitioner



Course Directors:

 



 



 







Juan C. Fernandez-Miranda, MD, FACS
Professor of Neurosurgery, and by Courtesy, of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery
Co-Director, Stanford Skull Base Surgery Program

 



 



 



 



 



 







Laurence Katznelson, MD
Professor of Neurosurgery and of Medicine (Endocrinology)
Medical Director, Pituitary Center

 
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A possible Helpful Doctor.  Anyone have any feedback?

 

Little Rock-based Arkansas Neuroscience Institute Co-founder and Director Ali Krisht, MD, received the 2019 Herbert Olivecrona Award for his neurosurgery work, Arkansas Money & Politics reports.

What you should know:

1. Dr. Krisht earned the honor — sometimes known as the Nobel Prize for neurosurgery — for his cerebrovascular, pituitary and skull base tumor surgery work.

2. He will receive the honor at the Scandinavian Neurosurgical Society meeting, May 19-20 in Stockholm, Sweden, where he will also deliver the conference's Olivecrona lecture.

3. Dr. Krisht is a renowned neurosurgeon. He earned his medical degree from Beirut, Lebanon-based American University of Beirut and completed a residency at Atlanta-based Emory University.

4. He is Contemporary Neurosurgery's chief editor and served as Pituitary Disorders: Comprehensive Management's main editor.

5. Dr. Krisht has written 20 book chapters and 50 peer-reviewed manuscripts. He has delivered more than 170 lectures and has directed more than 40 workshops and hands-on courses.
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I plan to do the Cushing's Awareness Challenge again. Last year's info is here:  https://cushieblogger.com/2018/03/11/time-to-sign-up-for-the-cushings-awareness-challenge-2018/

The original page is getting very slow loading, so I've moved my own posts to this newer blog.

As always, anyone who wants to join me can share their blog URL with me and I'll add it to the links on the right side, so whenever a new post comes up, it will show up automatically.

If the blogs are on WordPress, I try to reblog them all to get even more exposure on the blog, on Twitter and on Facebook at Cushings Help Organization, Inc.  If you have photos, and you give me permission, I'll add them to the Pinterest page for Cushing's Help.

The Cushing’s Awareness Challenge is almost upon us again!



 



Do you blog? Want to get started?



 



Since April 8 is Cushing’s Awareness Day, several people got their heads together to create the Eighth Annual Cushing’s Awareness Blogging Challenge.



 



All you have to do is blog about something Cushing’s related for the 30 days of April.



 



There will also be a logo for your blog to show you’ve participated.



 



Please let me know the URL to your blog in the comments area of this post, on the Facebook page, in one of the Cushing's Help Facebook Groups, on the message boards or an email  and I will list it on CushieBloggers (  http://cushie-blogger.blogspot.com/ )



 



The more people who participate, the more the word will get out about Cushing’s.

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Written by Kathleen Doheny

With Oskar Ragnarsson, MD, PHD, and Tamara Wexler, MD, PhD

Adults with Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism, have a three-fold higher risk of dying from heart disease compared to the general population,1 according to findings reported by a Swiss research team. Although the researchers found that the risk drops when patients are under care, receiving treatment, and are in remission, the risks don't disappear completely.  For some perspective, heart disease is common in the United States, affecting, one in four adults, regardless of health status.2
"Patients with Cushing's disease have excess mortality [risk]," says Oskar Ragnarsson, MD, PhD, associate professor and a senior consultant in internal medicine and endocrinology at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden. He is the author of the study, which appears in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Having Cushing's Requires Vigilance Beyond Disease Symptoms

Still, the news is not all bleak, he says. Simple awareness of the increased risks can help individuals reduce their risk, just as following your doctor’s treatment plan so remain in remission, Dr. Ragnarsson tells EndocrineWeb. In addition, patients who received growth hormone replacement appear to have better overall outcomes.1

Cushing’s syndrome occurs when your body is exposed to high levels of the hormone cortisol over a long period of time. This can be caused either by taking corticosteroid medicine orally, or if your body just makes too much cortisol.

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Cushing’s disease patients in Sweden have a higher risk of death than the general Swedish population, particularly of cardiovascular complications, and that increased risk persists even in patients in remission, a large nationwide study shows.

The study, “Overall and disease-specific mortality in patients with Cushing’s disease: a Swedish nationwide study,” was published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

The outcomes of Cushing’s disease patients have improved with the introduction of several therapeutic approaches, such as minimally invasive surgery and cortisol-lowering therapies. However, mortality is still high, especially among those who do not achieve remission.

While currently patients in remission are thought to have a better prognosis, it is still unclear whether these patients still have a higher mortality than the general population. Understanding whether these patients are more likely to die and what risk factors are associated with increased mortality is critical to reduce death rates among Cushing’s patients.

A team of Swedish researchers thus performed a retrospective study that included patients diagnosed with Cushing’s disease who were part of the Swedish National Patient Registry between 1987 and 2013.

A total of 502 patients with Cushing’s disease were included in the study, 419 of whom were confirmed to be in remission. Most patients (77%) were women; the mean age at diagnosis was 43 years, and the median follow-up time was 13 years.

During the follow-up, 133 Cushing’s patients died, compared to 54 expected deaths in the general population — a mortality rate 2.5 times higher, researchers said.

The most common causes of death among Cushing’s patients were cardiovascular diseases, particularly ischemic heart disease and cerebral infarctions. However, infectious and respiratory diseases (including pneumonia), as well as diseases of the digestive system, also contributed to the increased mortality among Cushing’s...
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Thirty-one former customers have filed suit in New Jersey State Court against Mario Badescu, Inc., a skincare company based out of Edison, New Jersey, and Mario Badescu Skin Care, Inc., a skincare salon in New York.

The plaintiffs allege that they were injured by potent and undisclosed steroids in two of Mario Badescu’s face creams, Control Cream, and Healing Cream, which were marketed as products that contained only “botanical” active ingredients that were safe for daily use. The complaint alleges that contrary to what Mario Badescu told the public, Control Cream and Healing Cream contained two steroids: hydrocortisone and triamcinolone acetonide. The complaint also alleges that Mario Badescu’s products contained higher than prescription-strength doses of triamcinolone acetonide. Both steroids pose serious health risks to both the skin and the body’s adrenal system.

The plaintiffs were unaware of the steroids in Mario Badescu’s products and used the products on their faces, usually daily, for as long as fourteen years. Many of the plaintiffs allege that they unwittingly became addicted to the steroids such that even a day without use of the Products caused severe and painful withdrawal reactions. Moreover, many of the plaintiffs allege that they suffered from steroid-related ailments while using Control Cream or Healing Cream, including cataracts, glaucoma, mood disorders, heart issues, elevated cortisol levels, adrenal system suppression and Cushing’s Syndrome. Plaintiffs allege that because they did not know they were using steroids at the time, they were unable to inform their physicians about the true source of their injuries and were repeatedly misdiagnosed by their medical providers.

“Mario Badescu secretly added an addictive prescription steroid to its cosmetic face creams, then told its customers that the creams were safe for daily use,” Plaintiffs’ counsel, Gary E. Mason said. “Our clients suffered devastating injuries as a result of this deception,” Mason added.

The plaintiffs are represented by John C. Whitfield, Gary E. Mason, Esfand Nafisi, and Caroline Ramsey Taylor of Whitfield Bryson & Mason LLP, and Michael Galpern, Andrew Bell and Janet Walsh of Locks Law Firm, LLC. For more information about the lawsuit, contact the firm by phone at (202)640-1167.

The name of the case is Restaino et al. v. Mario Badescu, Inc. et al., No. MID-L-5830-14 (N.J. Super. Ct. Law Div., filed Sept. 25, 2014).

See us on WTVH/WEHT Evansville! “Tristate Law Firm Takes On Major Cosmetics Company“
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Irina Bancos, M.D., an endocrinologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and Jamie J. Van Gompel, M.D., a neurosurgeon at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota, discuss Mayo's multidisciplinary approach to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary tumors. Pituitary tumors are common and often don't cause problems. But some pituitary tumors produce the hormone ACTH, which stimulates the production of another hormone (cortisol). Overproduction of cortisol can result in Cushing syndrome, with signs and symptoms such as weight gain, skin changes and fatigue. Cushing syndrome is rare but can cause significant long-term health problems.

Treatment for Cushing syndrome caused by a pituitary tumor generally involves surgery to remove the tumor. Radiation therapy and occasionally adrenal surgery may be needed to treat Cushing syndrome caused by ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors. Mayo Clinic has experience with this rare condition.

 

 

 

 
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Laparoscopic adrenalectomy — a minimally invasive procedure that removes the adrenal glands through a tiny hole in the abdomen — can be safely performed in obese patients with Cushing’s syndrome, a retrospective study reports.

The surgery resolved symptoms in 95% of cases, reducing cortisol levels, lowering blood pressure, and leading to a significant loss of weight in morbidly obese patients.

The study, “Minimally invasive approach to the adrenal gland in obese patients with Cushing’s syndrome,” was published in the journal Minimally Invasive Therapy & Allied Technologies.

Cushing’s syndrome results from the prolonged secretion of excess cortisol, the major glucocorticoid hormone. While most cases are caused by tumors in the pituitary gland, up to 27% result from tumors in the adrenal glands.

In these cases, the standard therapeutic strategy is to remove one or both adrenal glands, a surgical procedure called adrenalectomy. However, because glucocorticoids are key hormones regulating fat metabolism, Cushing’s syndrome patients are known to be prone to obesity, a feature that is often associated with post-operative complications.

In this study, researchers aimed to compare the outcomes of morbidly obese patients versus the mildly obese and non-obese who underwent a minimally invasive procedure to remove their adrenal glands.

The approach, called laparoscopic adrenalectomy, inserts tiny surgical tools through a small hole in the abdomen, along with a camera that helps guide the surgeon.

The study included 228 patients (mean age 53.4 years). Of them, 62 were non-obese, 87 were moderately obese, and 79 were considered morbidly obese. There were 121 patients with tumors in the right adrenal gland, 96 in the left gland, and 11 in both glands.

High blood pressure was the most common symptom, affecting 66.7% of the participants.
...
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Presented By

Jamie J. Van Gompel, MD, FAANS
Associate Professor in Neurosurgery and Otorhinolaryngology
Program Director, Vice Chair of Education, Department of Neurologic Surgery
Associate Program Director, Neurosurgical Skull Base Oncology Fellowship
Program Director, International Neurosurgery Fellowship
Mayo Clinic - Rochester, MN

and

Garret W. Choby, MD
Rhinologist
Endoscopic Skull Base Surgeon
Mayo Clinic - Rochester, MN

Register here

 

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

If you have any questions or suggestions please feel free to contact webinar@pituitary.org

DATE: Wednesday, March 13, 2019
TIME: 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Central Daylight Time, 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM EDT
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Hi my name is Jennifer. I live in east Texas and I have battled with drs for 4 years to get a diagnosis. Had ALL the classic cushings symptoms and saw many different doctors. Finally one in Houston BELIEVED me!!!! She found my pituitary adenoma and I had surgery May 7, 2018. I felt great for about a month then all my symptoms came back with a vengeance:(  I just had a MRI 2 weeks ago and they see a new suspicious area. The neurosurgeon thinks I need to have my pituitary completely removed and the Endocrinologist thinks I need to have a bilateral adrenalectomy. I go September 5 to meet with the adrenal surgeon. But in the mean time I am having to figure out which one to go with and ITS HARD!!!! Does anyone have any suggestions or can you tell me how your life improved after either one? I just want the one that will give me the best quality of life so that I may play with my husband and children again. Thank you so much for taking the time to read this. 
    • Thanks
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Patna: Improper functioning of the Pituitary gland usually results in excess or under production of hormones that leads to a formation of mass called tumor, which can be benign or malignant. Such tumors in this gland can create numerous serious medical conditions by interfering with the normal functioning of the endocrine system and pituitary gland.

 

“Though the occurrence of tumor is more likely after the age of 30 years, it still can impact at an early age. The survival rates of tumor due to its complicated location also depend on other factors like the patient’s age, type and size of tumor. Mostly, pituitary gland tumors are non cancerous but the exact causes are unknown. Some of them are hereditary and some are caused by a rare genetic disorder called as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. This disorder can also lead to over-activity or enlargement of 3 different endocrine-related glands, which also includes the pituitary gland. “Dr Aditya Gupta, Director, Neurosurgery, Agrim institute for neuro sciences, Artemis Hospital..
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The use of 3D-printed models could lead to less operation time and blood loss and fewer postoperative complications in adults who undergo endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas and other conditions, according to findings published in Pituitary.

“Several factors influence the outcome of endoscopic endonasal surgery, including the tumor volume, patient age, lesion location and sphenoid pneumatolysis,” Xiaobing Jiang, of the department of neurosurgery at Union Hospital of Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, Hubei, China, and colleagues wrote. “An accurate model of the target tumor structure is a major prerequisite for a successful [pituitary adenoma] resection, especially for macroadenomas, as this may avoid disastrous complications due to suboptimal treatment.”

Jiang and colleagues conducted a retrospective analysis of 20 adults who underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery at Union Hospital in Wuhan. Participants were included based on similar tumor sizes, the presence of no other diseases and nonintuitive tumor identification. All surgeries in the cohort occurred between January and August 2017, with 10 participants (mean age, 44.4 years; 50% women) receiving CT and MRI before surgery; the remaining 10 also received an operation with 3D printing (mean age, 41.2 years; 50% women).

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Each and every day since 1897,  I tell anyone who will listen about Cushing’s.  I pass out a LOT Cushing’s business cards. My husband also passes out cards and brochures.

Adding to websites, blogs and more which I have maintained continuously since 2000 - at mostly my own expense.

Posting on the Cushing's Help message boards about Rare Disease Day.  I post there most every day.

Tweeting/retweeting info about Cushing’s and Rare Disease Day today.

Adding info to one of my blogs about Cushing’s and Rare Disease Day.

Adding new and Golden Oldies bios to another blog, again most every day.

Thinking about getting the next Cushing’s Awareness Blogging Challenge set up for April...and will anyone else participate?

And updating https://www.facebook.com/CushingsInfo with a bunch of info today (and every day!)

~~~

Today is Rare Disease Day.

I had Cushing's Disease due to a pituitary tumor. I was told to diet, told to take antidepressants and told that it was all my fault that I was so fat. My pituitary surgery in 1987 was a "success" but I still deal with the aftereffects of Cushing's and of the surgery itself.

I also had another Rare Disease - Kidney Cancer, rare in younger, non-smoking women.

And then, there's the secondary adrenal insufficiency...and growth hormone deficiency...

If you're interested, you can read my bio here https://cushingsbios.com/2013/04/29/maryo-pituitary-bio/

What are YOU doing for Rare Disease Day?

 

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Good news! Version 4.4.0 of Invision Community is now available.

Major New Features / Enhancements..
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