Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Pituitary'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Welcome!
    • Introduce Yourself
    • Guest Questions
    • News Items and Research
    • Announcements
    • Questions about how these boards work?
  • Get Active!
    • Meetings, events and information
    • Fundraising Ideas
    • Cushing's Awareness Day, April 8
    • Spread the Word
    • Marathons
    • Cushing's Clothes Closet
    • Cushing's Library
    • Cushing's Store
  • Cushing's
    • Resources
    • Types of Cushing's
    • Symptoms
    • Tests
    • Treatments
  • Miscellaneous
    • Other Diseases
    • Good News / Attitude of Gratitude
    • Inspirational / Motivational
    • Quotes and Affirmations
    • Lighten Up!
    • Word Games
    • Miscellaneous Chit Chat
    • Current Events
    • Cushie Commerce
    • Internet Classes
    • Recipes

Blogs

  • MaryO'Blog
  • Christy Smith's Blog
  • rooon55's Blog
  • LLMart's Blog
  • regina from florida's Blog
  • terri's Blog
  • Canasa's Blog
  • Tberry's Blog
  • LisaMK's Blog
  • diane177432's Blog
  • Jen1978's Blog
  • GreenGal's Blog
  • Yada Yada Yada
  • Jinxie's Blog
  • SherryC's Blog
  • stjfs' Blog
  • kalimae7371's Blog
  • Kristy's Blog
  • kathieb1's Blog
  • Yavanna's Blog
  • Johnni's Blog
  • AutumnOMA's Blog
  • Will Power
  • dropsofjupiter's Blog
  • Lorrie's Blog
  • DebMV's Blog
  • FarWind's Blog
  • sallyt's Blog
  • dseefeldt's Blog
  • ladylena's Blog
  • steffie's Blog
  • Lori L's Blog
  • mysticalsusan1's Blog
  • cathy442's Blog
  • Kathy711's Blog
  • Shannonsmom's Blog
  • jack's Blog
  • Kandy66's Blog
  • mars72's Blog
  • singlesweetness33's Blog
  • michelletm's Blog
  • JC_Adair's Blog
  • Lisa-A's Blog
  • Jen3's Blog
  • tammi's Blog
  • Ramblin' Rose (Maggie's)
  • monicaroni77's Blog
  • monicaroni's Blog
  • Saz's Blog
  • alison
  • Thankful for the Journey
  • Judy from Pgh's Blog
  • Addiegirl's Blog
  • candlelite2000's Blog
  • Courtney likes to talk......
  • Tanya's Blog
  • smoketooash's Blog
  • meyerfamily8's Blog
  • Sheila1366's Blog
  • A Guide to Blogging...
  • Karen's Blog
  • barbj222222's Blog
  • Amdy's Blog
  • Jesh's Blog
  • pumpkin's Blog
  • Jazlady's Blog
  • Cristalrose's Blog
  • kikicee's Blog
  • bordergirl's Blog
  • Shelby's Blog
  • terry.t's Blog
  • CanadianGuy's Blog
  • Mar's Cushie Couch
  • leanne's Blog
  • honeybee30's Blog
  • cat lady's Blog
  • Denarea's Blog
  • Caroline's Blog
  • NatalieC's Blog
  • Ahnjhnsn's Blog
  • A journey around my brain!
  • wisconsin's Blog
  • sonda's Blog
  • Siobhan2007's Blog
  • mariahjo's Blog
  • garcia9's Blog
  • Jessie's Blog
  • Elise T.'s Blog
  • glandular-mass' Blog
  • Rachel Bridgewater's Blog
  • judycolby's Blog
  • CathyM's Blog
  • MelissaTX's Blog
  • nessie21's Blog
  • crzycarin's Blog
  • Drenfro's Blog
  • CathyMc's Blog
  • joanna27's Blog
  • Just my thoughts!
  • copacabana's Blog
  • msmith3033's Blog
  • EyeRishGrl's Blog
  • SaintPaul's Blog
  • joyce's Blog
  • Tara Lou's Blog
  • penybobeny's Blog
  • From Where I Sit
  • Questions..
  • jennsarad's Blog
  • looking4answers2's Blog
  • julie's blog
  • cushiemom's Blog
  • greydragon's Blog
  • AmandaL's Blog
  • KWDesigns: My Cushings Journey
  • cushieleigh's Blog
  • chelser245's Blog
  • melissa1375's Blog
  • MissClaudie's Blog
  • missclaudie92's Blog
  • EEYORETJBD's Blog
  • Courtney's Blog
  • Dawn's Blog
  • Lindsay's Blog
  • rosa's Blog
  • Marva's Blog
  • kimmy's Blog
  • Cheryl's Blog
  • MissingMe's Blog
  • FerolV's Blog
  • Audrey's (phil1088) Blog
  • sugarbakerqueen's Blog
  • KathyBair's Blog
  • Jenn's Blog
  • LisaE's Blog
  • qpdoll's Blog
  • blogs_blog_140
  • beach's Blog
  • Reillmommy is Looking for Answers...
  • natashac's Blog
  • Lisa72's Blog
  • medcats10's Blog
  • KaitlynElissa's Blog
  • shygirlxoxo's Blog
  • kerrim's Blog
  • Nicki's Blog
  • MOPPSEY's Blog
  • Betty's Blog
  • And the beat goes on...
  • Lynn's Blog
  • marionstar's Blog
  • floweroscotland's Blog
  • SleepyTimeTea's Blog
  • Shelly3's Blog
  • fatnsassy's Blog
  • gaga's Blog
  • Jewels' Blog
  • SusieQ's Blog
  • kayc6751's Blog
  • moonlight's Blog
  • Sick of Being Sick
  • Peggy's Blog
  • kouta5m's Blog
  • TerryC's Blog
  • snowii's Blog
  • azZ9's Blog
  • MaMaT333's Blog
  • missaf's Blog
  • libertybell's Blog
  • LyssaFace's Blog
  • suzypar2002's Blog
  • Mutley's Blog
  • superc's Blog
  • lisajo42's Blog
  • alaustin's Blog
  • Tina1962's Blog
  • Ill never complain a single word about anything.. If I get rid of Cushings disease.
  • puddingtoast's Blog
  • AmberC's Blog
  • annacox
  • justwaiting's Blog
  • RachaelB's Blog
  • MelanieW's Blog
  • My Blog
  • FLHeather's Blog
  • HollieK's Blog
  • Bonny777's Blog
  • KatieO's Blog
  • LilDickens' Mini World
  • MelissaG's Blog
  • KelseyMichelle's Blog
  • Synergy's Blog
  • Carolyn1435's Blog
  • Disease is ugly! Do I have to be?
  • A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single wobble
  • MichelleK's Blog
  • lenalee's Blog
  • DebGal's Blog
  • Needed Answers
  • Dannetts Blog
  • Marisa's Blog
  • Is this cushings?
  • alicia26's Blog
  • happymish's Blog
  • mileymo's Blog
  • It's a Cushie Life!
  • The Weary Zebra
  • mthrgonenuts' Blog
  • LoriW's Blog
  • WendyG's Blog
  • khmood's Blog
  • Finding Answers and Pissing Everyone Off Along the Way
  • elainewwjd's Blog
  • brie's Blog
  • dturner242's Blog
  • dturner242's Blog
  • dturner242's Blog
  • Stop the Violins
  • FerolV's Internal Blog
  • beelzebubble's Blog
  • RingetteLUVR
  • Eaglemtnlake's Blog
  • mck25's Blog
  • vicki11's Blog
  • vicki11's Blog
  • ChrissyL's Blog
  • tpatterson757's Blog
  • Falling2Grace's Blog
  • meeks089's Blog
  • JustCurious' Blog
  • Squeak's Blog
  • Kill Bill
  • So It Begins ! Cushings / Pituitary Microadenoma
  • Crystal34's Blog
  • Janice Barrett

Categories

  • Helpful Articles
    • Links
    • Research and News
    • Useful Information
  • Pages
  • Miscellaneous
    • Databases
    • Templates
    • Media

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

  1. Addison’s disease: Hyperpigmentation is a classic symptom of Addison’s disease, an endocrine disorder in which the adrenal glands fails to produce steroid hormone. The disease causes darkening of the skin in certain areas. Cushing’s syndrome: The abnormal amount of cortisol in the human body causes a condition known as the Cushing’s syndrome. And one of the symptoms of the disorder is hyperpigmentation of the skin. Adapted from http://www.thehealthsite.com/diseases-conditions/health-conditions-that-can-cause-hyperpigmentation/
  2. All patients who undergo removal of one adrenal gland due to Cushing’s syndrome (CS) or adrenal incidentaloma (AI, adrenal tumors discovered incidentally) should receive a steroid substitutive therapy, a new study shows. The study, “Predictability of hypoadrenalism occurrence and duration after adrenalectomy for ACTH‐independent hypercortisolism,” was published in the Journal of Endocrinological Investigation. CS is a rare disease, but subclinical hypercortisolism, an asymptomatic condition characterized by mild cortisol excess, has a much higher prevalence. In fact, subclinical hype
  3. until
    Presented by Kenneth M. De Los Reyes MD, MSc Assistant Professor Co-director of Skull Base Surgery Director of Quality Assurance Department of Neurosurgery Loma Linda University Medical Center Register Now! After registering you will receive a confirmation email with details about joining the webinar. Contact us at webinar@pituitary.org with any questions or suggestions. Date: Wednesday, December 13, 2017 Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Pacific Standard Time 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Eastern Standard Time Webinar Description Learning Objectives: Building Pati
  4. Presented by Kenneth M. De Los Reyes MD, MSc Assistant Professor Co-director of Skull Base Surgery Director of Quality Assurance Department of Neurosurgery Loma Linda University Medical Center Register Now! After registering you will receive a confirmation email with details about joining the webinar. Contact us at webinar@pituitary.org with any questions or suggestions. Date: Wednesday, December 13, 2017 Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Pacific Standard Time 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Eastern Standard Time Webinar Description Learning Objectives: Building Pati
  5. People with high cortisol levels have lower muscle mass and higher visceral fat deposits, putting them at a greater risk for cardiovascular disease, new research shows. High levels of cortisol can result from a variety of reasons, including Cushing’s disease and adrenal tumors. Most adrenal tumors are found to be non-functioning, meaning they do not produce excess hormones. However, up to 47 percent of patients have mild autonomous cortisol excess (MACE). The study, “Impact of hypercortisolism on skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue mass in patients with adrenal adenomas,” was pub
  6. ISRCTN71291784 DOI 10.1186/ISRCTN71291784 A study to investigate the prevalence of pituitary gland dysfunction and it's risk factors following traumatic brain injuries (TBI) Condition category Nervous System Diseases Date applied 28/08/2017 Date assigned 14/09/2017 Last edited 14/09/2017 Prospective/Retrospective Prospectively registered Overall trial status Ongoing Recruitment status Not yet recruiting
  7. By Tori Rodriguez, MA, LPC In the early 20th century, the term "pluriglandular syndrome" was coined by Harvey Cushing to describe the disorder that results from chronic tissue exposure to excessive levels of glucocorticoids.1 Now called Cushing's syndrome, the condition affects an estimated 10-15 million people annually, most often women and individuals between the ages of 20 and 50 years.2 Risk factors and common comorbidities include hypertension, obesity, osteoporosis, uncontrolled diabetes, depression, and anxiety.3 Presentation The clinical presentation of the disorder
  8. Abstract Objective Cushing's disease (CD) is a rare endocrine disorder characterized by excess secretion of ACTH due to a pituitary adenoma. Current treatment options are limited and may pose additional risks. A literature review was conducted to assess the holistic burden of CD. Design Studies published in English were evaluated to address questions regarding the epidemiology of CD, time to diagnosis, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), treatment outcomes, mortality, prevalence of comorbidities at diagnosis, and reversibility of comorbidities following the treatm
  9. CLCI699C2302: A Phase III, Multi-center, Randomized, Double-blind, 48 Week Study with an Initial 12 Week Placebo-controlled Period to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Osilodrostat in Patients with Cushing’s Disease Purpose In people with a disorder known as Cushing’s disease, levels of the hormone cortisol are very high in the urine and blood. Lowering cortisol levels relieves the symptoms of Cushing’s disease. Osilodrostat is an investigational drug that inhibits an enzyme needed for co
  10. until
    Presented by Linda M. Rio, M.A., MFT After registering you will receive a confirmation email with details about joining the webinar. Contact us at webinar@pituitary.org with any questions or suggestions. DATE: July 17, 2017 TIME: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time/1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time Webinar Learning Objectives: By attending this webinar participants will: Be able to identify at least 3 mental health symptoms that are common to those diagnosed with a pituitary disorder. Understand basics of “trauma” and its pot
  11. Today is the anniversary of MaryO's pituitary surgery at NIH in 1987. Read more at https://cushingsbios.com/2016/11/03/29-years-giving-thanks/
  12. I am a very late entry. Shortly after my 5th anniversary post surgery 2005, in the 6th year, I knew something was "different". That old sense of dread returned. At the 6th anniversary checkup, I popped a "high" on urine cortisol. But it was a one time thing, not repeated in a "sequential lab". Over the next two years, my blood sugar went haywire, not controlled by higher and higher doses of metformin. My weight began creeping up from 150# to just over 180# when the blood labs confirmed in the 8th year, "the monster" was back, with a new head. I was referred to UVA, Dr. Mary V. and her teammat
  13. Finding may lead to therapies that prevent pituitary tumor recurrence. Read more: https://www.nih.gov/news-events/nih-researchers-find-potential-genetic-cause-cushing-syndrome
  14. Clinical trials are research studies that test new treatments to see how well they work. Our Pituitary and Skull Base Tumor Center is leading clinical trials investigating new medical therapies for patients with Cushing’s disease and acromegaly. They are also involved in quality-of-life studies aimed at improving long-term follow-up care for patients who need it. Our experts can help determine which clinical trials are right for you. The following clinical trials for pituitary tumors are currently enrolling new patients. To learn more about a particular study, choose from the list belo
  15. Rank Status Study 1 Recruiting Study to Evaluate CORT125134 in Patients With Cushing's Syndrome Condition: Cushing's Syndrome Intervention: Drug: CORT125134 2 Recruiting Cushing's Disease Complications Condition: Cushing's Disease Intervention: Other: Exams and questionnaires 3 Recruiting The Accuracy of Late Night Urinary Free Cortisol/Creatinine and Hair Cortisol in Cushing's Syndrome Diagnosis Condi
  16. Two investigational long-acting growth-hormone (GH) replacement products hold potential for less frequent dosing and improved adherence among adult patients with proven growth-hormone deficiency. Adult growth-hormone deficiency is a rare disorder characterized by the inadequate secretion of the growth hormone from the pituitary gland. It can be hereditary; can be acquired as a result of trauma, infection, radiation therapy, or brain tumor growth; and can even emerge without a diagnosable cause. Currently, it is treated with once-daily injections of subcutaneous growth hormone. The
  17. Diagnosing Cushing’s syndrome can take 24 hours of complicated and repeated analysis of blood and urine, brain imaging, and tissue samples from sinuses. But that may soon be in the past: National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers have found that measuring cortisol levels in hair samples can do the same job faster. Patients with Cushing’s syndrome have a high level of cortisol, perhaps from a tumor of the pituitary or adrenal glands, or as a side effect from medications. In the study, 36 participants—30 with Cushing’s syndrome, six without—provided hair samples divided into three equ
  18. I find it amazing that it's newsworthy in this day and age for anyone receiving support after a diagnosis. Of course, a diagnosed person should be getting support as a matter of course. If she had cancer, everyone would be all over this. For Kara Murrow, the most rewarding moments as a teacher come when students learn about animals in the classroom. So it’s difficult for the Bonham Elementary fifth-grade science and social studies teacher to be away from school while she prepares for surgery. “I enjoy it, and I know my kids enjoy the class and enjoy science because of it,” Murrow said.
  19. Early and midterm nonremission after transsphenoidal surgery in people with Cushing’s disease may be predicted by normalized early postoperative values for adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol, study data show. Prashant Chittiboina, MD, MPH, assistant clinical investigator in the neurosurgery unit for pituitary and inheritable diseases at the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke at the NIH, and colleagues evaluated 250 patients with Cushing’s disease who received 291 transsphenoidal surgery procedures during the study period to determine remission after the procedure.
  20. Cushing disease is caused by tumour in the pituitary gland which leads to excessive secretion of a hormone called adrenocorticotrophic (ACTH), which in turn leads to increasing levels of cortisol in the body. Cortisol is a steroid hormone released by the adrenal glands and helps the body to deal with injury or infection. Increasing levels of cortisol increases the blood sugar and can even cause diabetes mellitus. However the disease is also caused due to excess production of hypothalamus corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) which stimulates the synthesis of cortisol by the adrenal glands. Th
  21. A victim of brain injury can experience many consequences and complications as a result of brain damage. Unfortunately, the problems caused by a traumatic brain injury can extend even beyond what most people think of as the standard symptoms of a brain injury, like mood change and cognitive impairment. One issue which can occur is pituitary dysfunction. If the pituitary gland is damaged due to injury to the brain, the consequences can be dramatic as the pituitary gland works together with the hypothalamus to control every hormonal aspect of a person’s body. Pituitary dysfunction as a res
  22. Doc Karen will be our guest in an interview on BlogTalk Radio Friday December 2 at 11:00 AM eastern. The Call-In number for questions or comments is (323) 642-1665 . The archived interview will be available through iTunes Podcasts (Cushie Chats) or BlogTalkRadio. While you're waiting, there are currently 90 other past interviews to listen to! Karen’s Story Life was good! In fact, life was great! I was married to the love of my life. We had a beautiful little girl. My husband and I had both earned our graduate degrees. I earned my Doctorate in Clinical Psychology and was gr
  23. Fabiana had transsphenoidal surgery (pituitary) July 30th 2004. She had a recurrence after seven years of being Cushing's free. A second pituitary surgery on 10/26/2011 was unsuccessful. Another Golden Oldie, this bio was last updated 9/12/2015 Fabiana will be our guest in an interview on BlogTalk Radio Wednesday, October 21 at 6:00 PM eastern. The Call-In number for questions or comments is (657) 383-0416. The archived interview will be available after 7:00 PM Eastern through iTunes Podcasts (Cushie Chats) or BlogTalkRadio. While you're waiting, there are currently 88 other
  24. It’s hard to say when my exact “journey” began with what we now know is Cushing’s Disease. Both my Mom and my doctor believe I’ve had this for years, when I started having period problems, migraines and unexplained weight gain in high school. I can safely say that I started really noticing/documenting this last round of health issues in the spring of 2007. I can remember my first doctor’s visit regarding the onset of this in spring 2006, but the majority of my health issues really began a year later. I’d always suffered from migraines, but only around my menstrual periods. I took birth
  25. If is for me. This is not the same as food allergy, this is a reaction to the histamine content of foods, or foods that cause mast cells to release histamine, coupled with genetic or acquired deficiency of the enzyme that breaks down histamine in the normal gut: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/85/5/1185.long I've noticed that almost everyone on a histamine intolerance forum is diagnosed with Hashimoto's or "adrenal fatigue" or high cortisol and also have a lot of gut symptoms: "Histamine intolerance results from a disequilibrium of accumulated histamine and the capacity for hist
×
×
  • Create New...