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  1. I don't know if there's anything of interest here - or the cost - but possibly useful to someone. Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment Market research report is the new statistical data source added by Research Cognizance. “Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment Market is growing at a High CAGR during the forecast period 2022-2029. The increasing interest of the individuals in this industry is that the major reason for the expansion of this market”. Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment Market research is an intelligence report with meticulous efforts undertaken to study the right and valuable information. The data which has been looked upon is done considering both, the existing top players and the upcoming competitors. Business strategies of the key players and the new entering market industries are studied in detail. Well explained SWOT analysis, revenue share, and contact information are shared in this report analysis. Get the PDF Sample Copy (Including FULL TOC, Graphs, and Tables) of this report @: https://researchcognizance.com/sample-request/896 Top Key Players Profiled in this report are: Novartis, Orphagen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Corcept Therapeutics The key questions answered in this report: What will be the Market Size and Growth Rate in the forecast year? What are the Key Factors driving Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment Market? What are the Risks and Challenges in front of the market? Who are the Key Vendors in Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment Market? What are the Trending Factors influencing the market shares? What are the Key Outcomes of Porter’s five forces model? Which are the Global Opportunities for Expanding the Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment Market? Various factors are responsible for the market’s growth trajectory, which are studied at length in the report. In addition, the report lists down the restraints that are posing threat to the global Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment market. It also gauges the bargaining power of suppliers and buyers, threat from new entrants and product substitute, and the degree of competition prevailing in the market. The influence of the latest government guidelines is also analyzed in detail in the report. It studies the Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment market’s trajectory between forecast periods. Get up to 30% Discount on this Premium Report @: https://researchcognizance.com/discount/896 Regions Covered in the Global Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment Market Report 2022: • The Middle East and Africa (GCC Countries and Egypt) • North America (the United States, Mexico, and Canada) • South America (Brazil etc.) • Europe (Turkey, Germany, Russia UK, Italy, France, etc.) • Asia-Pacific (Vietnam, China, Malaysia, Japan, Philippines, Korea, Thailand, India, Indonesia, and Australia) The cost analysis of the Global Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment Market has been performed while keeping in view manufacturing expenses, labor cost, and raw materials and their market concentration rate, suppliers, and price trend. Other factors such as Supply chain, downstream buyers, and sourcing strategy have been assessed to provide a complete and in-depth view of the market. Buyers of the report will also be exposed to a study on market positioning with factors such as target client, brand strategy, and price strategy taken into consideration. The report provides insights on the following pointers: Market Penetration: Comprehensive information on the product portfolios of the top players in the Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment market. Product Development/Innovation: Detailed insights on the upcoming technologies, R&D activities, and product launches in the market. Competitive Assessment: In-depth assessment of the market strategies, geographic and business segments of the leading players in the market. Market Development: Comprehensive information about emerging markets. This report analyzes the market for various segments across geographies. Market Diversification: Exhaustive information about new products, untapped geographies, recent developments, and investments in the Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment market. Table of Content Global Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment Market Research Report Chapter 1: Global Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment Industry Overview Chapter 2: Global Economic Impact on Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment Industry Chapter 3: Global Market Competition by Industry Producers Chapter 4: Global Productions, Revenue (Value), according to regions Chapter 5: Global Supplies (Production), Consumption, Export, Import, geographically Chapter 6: Global Productions, Revenue (Value), Price Trend, Product Type Chapter 7: Global Market Analysis, on the basis of Application Chapter 8: Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment Market Pricing Analysis Chapter 9: Market Chain, Sourcing Strategy, and Downstream Buyers Chapter 10: Strategies and key policies by Distributors/Suppliers/Traders Chapter 11: Key Marketing Strategy Analysis, by Market Vendors Chapter 12: Market Effect Factors Analysis Chapter 13: Global Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnostic and Treatment Market Forecast Buy Exclusive Report @: https://researchcognizance.com/checkout/896/single_user_license If you have any special requirements, please let us know and we will offer you the report as you want. About Us: Research Cognizance is an India-based market research Company, registered in Pune. Research Cognizance aims to provide meticulously researched insights into the market. We offer high-quality consulting services to our clients and help them understand prevailing market opportunities. Our database presents ample statistics and thoroughly analyzed explanations at an affordable price. Contact Us: Neil Thomas 116 West 23rd Street 4th Floor New York City, New York 10011 sales@researchcognizance.com +1 7187154714
  2. Cushing’s disease is a progressive pituitary disorder in which there is an excess of cortisol in the body. While the disease can be treated surgically, this option is not possible for all patients. This is one of the approved medications that assist in controlling cortisol levels in people with Cushing’s disease. Korlym (mifepristone), developed and marketed by Corcept Therapeutics, is an FDA-approved treatment for high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) in adults with Cushing’s syndrome who have type 2 diabetes or glucose intolerance, and for whom surgery is not an option, or failed to control their symptoms. Bios of Cushies who have taken Korlym. Korlym discussions on the Message Boards. Learn more here and here. How does Korlym work? Cushing’s syndrome is characterized by high levels of cortisol in the body. Cortisol is a hormone that helps control a wide range of bodily functions, including blood pressure, salt levels, and blood sugar (glucose) levels. Too much cortisol may cause blood sugar levels to rise — a hallmark of both type 2 diabetes and glucose intolerance. Cortisol exerts its effects by binding to glucocorticoid receptors on the surface of cells. Korlym works by blocking cortisol’s access to these receptors, thereby preventing the chain of events leading to elevated blood sugar levels and diabetes. The medication is specifically meant to treat patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome, in which the body’s own overproduction of cortisol — usually due to the presence of a tumor — is the reason why hormone levels rise above healthy limits. Korlym in clinical trials Corcept conducted a Phase 3 trial (NCT00569582) to evaluate the safety and efficacy of mifepristone in 50 adults with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome and type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance, or high blood pressure alone. In the group with diabetes, 60% of participants showed a clinically meaningful improvement in glucose control in a two-hour oral glucose test. In the high blood pressure group, an improvement in diastolic blood pressure — the pressure in the arteries while the heart rests between beats — was seen in 38% of participants. In addition, an overall clinical improvement was seen in 87% of participants, as assessed by an independent review board. Board members looked at a range of symptoms, including body weight and composition, Cushing-like appearance, and psychological symptoms. Common adverse events reported in the study included fatigue, nausea, headache, low potassium, joint pain, vomiting, and swelling, called edema. Thickening of the lining of the uterus was reported among female participants. A pilot Phase 4 trial (NCT01990560) also demonstrated that mifepristone may be helpful in managing mild autonomous cortisol secretion (ACS), a subclinical form of Cushing’s syndrome in which patients do not display typical signs and symptoms of Cushing’s, despite having high cortisol levels. That pilot trial enrolled eight patients who received 300 mg tablets once daily for six months. In two patients, this dose was upped to 600 mg after two months due to a lack of clinical response. Treatment led to significant reductions in fasting glucose levels and insulin resistance — when certain cells no longer respond well to insulin, a hormone that controls how cells store and use glucose. Another study also indicated that mifepristone can effectively treat patients with ectopic Cushing’s syndrome. This is a form of Cushing’s caused by tumors found outside the brain’s pituitary gland, in which case the condition is known as Cushing’s disease. Other details Korlym’s blood absorption is higher when the medication is given with food. Patients should, therefore, take the medication within one hour of having a meal, so as to increase its effectiveness. Importantly, eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice should be avoided while taking the medication, since both may interfere with its absorption. Korlym also may interact with a variety of other prescription meds, including cholesterol-lowering medicines simvastatin and lovastatin, the immunosuppressant cyclosporine, headache treatments ergotamine and dihydroergotamine, and opioid fentanyl. The antifungal treatment ketoconazole (sold under the brand name Nizoral, among others), used off-label to treat Cushing’s in the U.S., also can change the way Korlym is absorbed in the body. Since both medications can be prescribed simultaneously to Cushing’s patients, doctors should carefully evaluate their benefits, taking into account the potential risks. Additionally, mifepristone — Korlym’s active ingredient — blocks the action of the hormone progesterone, which is important for maintaining pregnancy. Taking Korlym during pregnancy will result in pregnancy loss. Therefore, Korlym should never be taken by women who are pregnant or by those who may become pregnant. Treatment with Korlym also may cause blood potassium levels to drop, a condition known as hypokalemia. Potassium is a mineral that helps the body regulate fluid balance, nerve signals, and muscle contraction. As such, patients’ potassium levels should be monitored closely in the first weeks after starting or increasing Korlym’s dose, as well as periodically thereafter.
  3. MENLO PARK, Calif., Aug. 28, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Corcept Therapeutics Incorporated (NASDAQ: CORT) announced today that the United States Patent and Trademark Office has issued a Notice of Allowance for a patent covering the administration of Korlym® with food. The patent will expire in November 2032. “This patent covers an important finding of our research – that for optimal effect, Korlym must be taken with food,” said Joseph K. Belanoff, MD, Corcept’s Chief Executive Officer. “Korlym’s label instructs doctors that ‘Korlym must always be taken with a meal.’” Upon issuance, Corcept plans to list the patent, entitled “Optimizing Mifepristone Absorption” (U.S. Pat. App. 13/677,465), in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence Evaluations (the “Orange Book”). Korlym is currently protected by ten patents listed in the Orange Book. Hypercortisolism Hypercortisolism, often referred to as Cushing’s syndrome, is caused by excessive activity of the hormone cortisol. Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome is an orphan disease that most often affects adults aged 20-50. In the United States, an estimated 20,000 patients have Cushing’s syndrome, with about 3,000 new patients diagnosed each year. Symptoms vary, but most people with Cushing’s syndrome experience one or more of the following manifestations: high blood sugar, diabetes, high blood pressure, upper-body obesity, rounded face, increased fat around the neck, thinning arms and legs, severe fatigue and weak muscles. Irritability, anxiety, cognitive disturbances and depression are also common. Hypercortisolism can affect every organ system in the body and can be lethal if not treated effectively. About Corcept Therapeutics Incorporated Corcept is a commercial-stage company engaged in the discovery and development of drugs that treat severe metabolic, oncologic and psychiatric disorders by modulating the effects of the stress hormone cortisol. Korlym® (mifepristone) was the first treatment approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for patients with Cushing’s syndrome. Corcept has discovered a large portfolio of proprietary compounds, including relacorilant, exicorilant and miricorilant, that selectively modulate the effects of cortisol but not progesterone. Corcept owns extensive United States and foreign intellectual property covering the composition of its selective cortisol modulators and the use of cortisol modulators, including mifepristone, to treat a variety of serious disorders. Forward-Looking Statements Statements in this press release, other than statements of historical fact, are forward-looking statements, which are based on Corcept’s current plans and expectations and are subject to risks and uncertainties that might cause actual results to differ materially from those such statements express or imply. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, Corcept’s ability to generate sufficient revenue to fund its commercial operations and development programs; the availability of competing treatments, including generic versions of Korlym; Corcept’s ability to obtain acceptable prices or adequate insurance coverage and reimbursement for Korlym; and risks related to the development of Corcept’s product candidates, including regulatory approvals, mandates, oversight and other requirements. These and other risks are set forth in Corcept’s SEC filings, which are available at Corcept’s website and the SEC’s website. In this press release, forward-looking statements include those concerning Corcept’s plans to list the patent “Optimizing Mifepristone Absorption” in the Orange Book; Korlym’s current protection by ten patents listed in the Orange Book; and the scope and protective power of Corcept’s intellectual property. Corcept disclaims any intention or duty to update forward-looking statements made in this press release. CONTACT: Christopher S. James, MD Director, Investor Relations Corcept Therapeutics 650-684-8725 cjames@corcept.com www.corcept.com
  4. Corcept Therapeutics (NASDAQ:CORT) announced that it would be ready to ship Korlym to patients by April 11th, three weeks ahead of the company’s previously announced launch date. “Cushing’s syndrome is a life altering and life threatening disease,” said Joseph K. Belanoff, M.D., the company’s Chief Executive Officer. “We have worked hard to bring this first-in-class treatment to patients as quickly as possible.” On February 17, 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved KorlymTM (mifepristone) 300 mg Tablets as a once-daily oral medicine to control hyperglycemia secondary to hypercortisolism in adult patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome who have type 2 diabetes mellitus or glucose intolerance and have failed surgery or are not candidates for surgery. Physicians and patients seeking more information can visit http://www.korlym.com. Korlym is distributed in 300 milligram tablets to be taken once each day. The wholesale acquisition price of Korlym is $0.62 per milligram. The FDA-approved labeling instructs physicians to titrate each patient’s Korlym dose to clinical efficacy by assessing tolerability and degree of improvement in Cushing’s syndrome manifestations. In the first six weeks, these manifestations may include changes in glucose control, anti-diabetic medication requirements, insulin levels and psychiatric symptoms. After two months, assessment may also be based on improvements in cushingoid appearance, acne, hirsutism, striae or decreased body weight, along with further changes in glucose control. Patient Assistance Programs “Our highest priority is that every patient who is prescribed Korlym will receive it,” said Dr. Belanoff. To that end, the company has launched a comprehensive financial assistance and patient support program. A dedicated team of Corcept case managers will help patients understand their insurance benefits and the financial and medical support programs available to them. “Patients face tremendous challenges managing their illness – from finding physicians familiar with the disease to navigating the complexities of insurance reimbursement to paying for the cost of care,” said Dr. Belanoff. “We are determined that none of these barriers will keep patients from receiving the benefits of Korlym.” About Cushing’s Syndrome Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome is a rare and life-threatening endocrine disorder that results from long-term exposure to excess levels of the hormone cortisol. This excess is caused by tumors that usually occur in the pituitary or adrenal glands that over-produce, or prompt the over-production of, cortisol. Although cortisol at normal levels is essential to health, in excess it causes a variety of problems, including hyperglycemia, upper body obesity, a rounded face, stretch marks on the skin, an accumulation of fat on the back, thin and easily bruised skin, muscle weakness, bone weakness, persistent infections, high blood pressure, fatigue, irritability, anxiety, psychosis and depression. Women may have menstrual irregularities and facial hair growth, while men may have decreased fertility or erectile dysfunction. More than 70 percent of Cushing’s syndrome patients suffer from glucose intolerance or diabetes. The treatment of an endogenous Cushing’s syndrome patient depends on the cause. The first-line approach is surgery to remove the tumor. If surgery is not successful or is not an option, radiation may be used, but that therapy can take up to ten years to achieve full effect. Surgery and radiation are successful in only approximately one-half of all cases. If left untreated, Cushing’s syndrome has a five-year mortality rate of 50 percent. An orphan disease, Cushing’s syndrome occurs in about 20,000 people in the United States, mostly women between the ages of 20 and 50. About Korlym™ (mifepristone) 300 mg Tablets Korlym is a once-daily oral medication that blocks the glucocorticoid receptor type II (GR-II) to which cortisol normally binds. By blocking this receptor, Korlym inhibits the effects of excess cortisol in Cushing’s syndrome patients. The FDA has designated Korlym as an Orphan Drug, a special status designed to encourage the development of medicines for rare diseases and conditions. Because Korlym is an Orphan Drug, Corcept will have marketing exclusivity for the FDA-approved indication until February 2019. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION WARNING: TERMINATION OF PREGNANCY See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning. Mifepristone has potent antiprogestational effects and will result in the termination of pregnancy. Pregnancy must therefore be excluded before the initiation of treatment with Korlym, or if treatment is interrupted for more than 14 days in females of reproductive potential. Contraindications Pregnancy Use of simvastatin or lovastatin and CYP 3A substrates with narrow therapeutic range Concurrent long-term corticosteroid use Women with history of unexplained vaginal bleeding Women with endometrial hyperplasia with atypia or endometrial carcinoma Warnings and Precautions Adrenal insufficiency: Patients should be closely monitored for signs and symptoms of adrenal insufficiency. Hypokalemia: Hypokalemia should be corrected prior to treatment and monitored for during treatment. Vaginal bleeding and endometrial changes: Women may experience endometrial thickening or unexpected vaginal bleeding. Use with caution if patient also has a hemorrhagic disorder or is on anti-coagulant therapy. QT interval prolongation: Avoid use with QT interval-prolonging drugs, or in patients with potassium channel variants resulting in a long QT interval. Use of Strong CYP3A Inhibitors: Concomitant use can increase plasma levels significantly. Use only when necessary and limit dose to 300 mg. Adverse Reactions Most common adverse reactions in Cushing’s syndrome (≥ 20%): nausea, fatigue, headache, decreased blood potassium, arthralgia, vomiting, peripheral edema, hypertension, dizziness, decreased appetite, endometrial hypertrophy. To report suspected adverse reactions, contact Corcept Therapeutics at 1-855-844-3270 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. Drug Interactions Drugs metabolized by CYP3A: Administer drugs that are metabolized by CYP3A at the lowest dose when used with Korlym CYP3A inhibitors: Caution should be used when Korlym is used with strong CYP3A inhibitors. Limit mifepristone dose to 300 mg per day when used with strong CYP3A inhibitors. CYP3A inducers: Do not use Korlym with CYP3A inducers. Drugs metabolized by CYP2C8/2C9: Use the lowest dose of CYP2C8/2C9 substrates when used with Korlym. Drugs metabolized by CYP2B6: Use of Korlym should be done with caution with bupropion and efavirenz. Hormonal contraceptives: Do not use with Korlym. Use in Specific Populations Nursing mothers: Discontinue drug or discontinue nursing. Please see the accompanying full Prescribing Information including boxed warning atwww.corcept.com/prescribinginfo.pdf Please see the accompanying Medication Guide at www.corcept.com/medicationguide.pdf About Corcept Therapeutics Incorporated Corcept is a pharmaceutical company engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of drugs for the treatment of severe metabolic and psychiatric disorders. Korlym, a first generation GR-II antagonist, is the company’s first FDA-approved medication. The company has a portfolio of new selective GR-II antagonists that block the effects of cortisol but not progesterone. Corcept also owns an extensive intellectual property portfolio covering the use of GR-II antagonists, including mifepristone, in the treatment of a wide variety of psychiatric and metabolic disorders. The company also holds composition of matter patents for its selective GR-II antagonists. Statements made in this news release, other than statements of historical fact, are forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are subject to a number of known and unknown risks and uncertainties that might cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such statements. For example, there can be no assurances that clinical results will be predictive of real-world use, or regarding the pace of Korlym’s acceptance by physicians and patients, the reimbursement decisions of government or private insurance payers, the effects of rapid technological change and competition, the protections afforded by Korlym’s Orphan Drug Designation or by Corcept’s other intellectual property rights, and the cost, pace and success of Corcept’s other product development efforts. These and other risks are set forth in the Company's SEC filings, all of which are available from our website (www.corcept.com) or from the SEC's website (www.sec.gov). We disclaim any intention or duty to update any forward-looking statement made in this news release. CONTACT: Investor Contact Charles Robb Chief Financial Officer Corcept Therapeutics 650-688-8783
  5. FDA NEWS RELEASE For Immediate Release: Feb. 17, 2012 Media Inquiries: Morgan Liscinsky, 301-796-0397; morgan.liscinsky@fda.hhs.gov Consumer Inquiries: 888-INFO-FDA FDA approves Korlym for patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome Today, Korlym (mifepristone) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to control high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) in adults with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome. This drug was approved for use in patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome who have type 2 diabetes or glucose intolerance and are not candidates for surgery or who have not responded to prior surgery. Korlym should never be used (contraindicated) by pregnant women. Prior to FDA’s approval of Korlym, there were no approved medical therapies for the treatment of endogenous Cushing’s syndrome. Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome is a serious, debilitating and rare multisystem disorder. It is caused by the overproduction of cortisol (a steroid hormone that increases blood sugar levels) by the adrenal glands. This syndrome most commonly affects adults between the ages of 25 and 40. About 5,000 patients will be eligible for Korlym treatment, which received an orphan drug designation by the FDA in 2007. Korlym blocks the binding of cortisol to its receptor. It does not decrease cortisol production but reduces the effects of excess cortisol, such as high blood sugar levels. The safety and efficacy of Korlym in patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome was evaluated in a clinical trial with 50 patients. A separate open-label extension of this trial is ongoing. Additional evidence supporting the agency’s approval included several safety pharmacology studies, drug-drug interaction studies and published scientific literature. Patients experienced significant improvement in blood sugar control during Korlym treatment, including some patients who had marked reductions in their insulin requirements. Improvements in clinical signs and symptoms were reported by some patients. The most common side effects experienced by endogenous Cushing’s syndrome patients treated with Korlym in clinical trials were nausea, fatigue, headache, arthralgia, vomiting, swelling of the extremities, dizziness and decreased appetite. Other side effects of Korlym include adrenal insufficiency, low potassium levels, vaginal bleeding and a potential for heart conduction abnormalities. Certain drugs used in combination with Korlym may increase its drug level. Health care professionals must be aware of the potential for drug-drug interactions and adjust dosing or avoid using certain drugs with Korlym. Korlym should never be used by pregnant women. Although pregnancy is an extremely rare occurrence in Cushing’s syndrome patients because of the suppressive effect of excess cortisol on female reproductive function, Korlym will carry a Boxed Warning advising health care professionals and patients that the therapy will terminate a pregnancy. The FDA has determined that a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) is not necessary for Korlym to ensure that the benefits outweigh the risks for patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome. Several factors were considered in this determination including the following: There are no other approved medical therapies for this debilitating form of Cushing’s syndrome and very sick patients would suffer if impediments to access were imposed. The number of Cushing’s syndrome patients who will require treatment with Korlym is small, with an estimated 5,000 patients being eligible for treatment. The number of health care professionals in the United States who would potentially prescribe Korlym is very small and highly specialized. They are familiar with the risks of Korlym treatment in the endogenous Cushing’s syndrome population and frequently monitor patient status. The risks of Korlym treatment in the intended population can be managed through physician and patient labeling. The risks associated with Korlym will be outlined in a medication guide for patients. The company has voluntarily proposed distributing Korlym through a central pharmacy to ensure the timely, convenient and appropriate delivery of the drug to Cushing’s patients or to the health care institutions where this therapy may be initiated. Most retail pharmacies are unlikely to keep adequate supplies of the drug for this rare condition and central distribution will give patients with Cushing’s syndrome better access to Korlym. Korlym is manufactured by Corcept Therapeutics of Menlo Park, Calif. For more information: Approved Drugs: Questions and Answers The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products. # Visit the FDA on Facebook RSS Feed for FDA News Releases [what is RSS?] Page Last Updated: 02/17/2012 From http://www.fda.gov/N...s/ucm292462.htm This post has been promoted to an article
  6. Availability Of An Investigational Drug For Severe Cushing’s Syndrome On a Compassionate Use Basis December, 2011 We would like to make patients aware that mifepristone, an investigational drug that blocks the action of cortisol and is being developed by Corcept Therapeutics Incorporated, is now available on a compassionate use basis for eligible patients in the United States with Cushing’s syndrome who have no other treatment options. Under this compassionate use program, the FDA allows seriously ill patients who lack satisfactory alternative treatment options to use an investigational new drug that is still under development. Corcept has completed a Phase III trial investigating the safety and efficacy of mifepristone in patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome. The information from that study has been submitted to the FDA for review of safety and efficacy. The company has submitted a New Drug Application (NDA) seeking approval for this drug. Patients interested in using mifepristone should consult with their endocrinologist. Their endocrinologist, in turn, should contact Corcept for information about the compassionate use program. Please note that Corcept will provide information solely to physicians. For more information: http://www.corcept.com/cushings_expanded_access Toll Free: 1-877-367-6550 E-mail: EAP@Corcept.com Dr. F asked me to post this again. (MaryO, I hope this is ok.)
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