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Found 9 results

  1. Dr. Friedman is getting a lot of emails on booster shots versus third shots. Third shots are for immuno-compromised patients that the FDA is recommending for a small group of patients The FDA also has the intention to soon make booster doses widely available to all healthy individuals. I am writing to clarify the difference between booster shots and third doses. Third Doses for Immuno-Compromised Patients The purpose of a third dose of mRNA vaccine is to give immuno-compromised patients the same level of protection that two doses provide someone who has a normal immune system. It is recommended that the following people get a third dose Been receiving cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system Received a stem cell transplant within the last two years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system Been diagnosed with moderate or severe immunodeficiency conditions (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome) An advanced or untreated HIV infection Been under active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids (> 20 mg of prednisone or 100 mg of hydrocortisone) or other drugs that may suppress immune response Dr. Friedman thinks it is unlikely that any of his patients have these conditions. Patients with Cushing’s syndrome, Addison’s, diabetes or thyroid disorders do not qualify. In contrast, a Booster Dose is for Patients With Healthy Immune Systems A booster dose—which is different from a third dose for immuno-compromised patients—is for healthy patients and is meant to enhance immunity and may protect against new variants of the virus. The Biden administration has announced that it intends to make booster doses available for people with healthy immune systems in September 2021, after they are authorized or approved by the FDA. This has not happened yet, but when it happens, Dr. Friedman would encourage his patients to get it. Dr. Friedman is expecting a booster shot against the Delta variant to be released in the fall of 2021 and would recommend that for his patients. Dr. Friedman wishes everyone to stay healthy.
  2. Updates on Treating Hypothyroidism Dr. Theodore Friedman will be giving a webinar on Updates on Treating Hypothyroidism. Topics to be discussed include: New articles showing patients prefer desiccated thyroid New thyroid hormone preparations Update on desiccated thyroid recalls New article on why TSH is less important than thyroid hormone measurements What is the difference between desiccated thyroid and synthetic thyroid hormones? Is rT3 important? Sunday • April 25• 6 PM PDT Via Zoom Click here to join the meeting or https://us02web.zoom.us/j/4209687343?pwd=amw4UzJLRDhBRXk1cS9ITU02V1pEQT09 OR +16699006833,,4209687343#,,,,*111116# Slides will be available before the webinar and recording after the meeting at slides Meeting ID: 420 968 7343 Passcode: 111116 Your phone/computer will be muted on entry. There will be plenty of time for questions using the chat button. For more information, email us at mail@goodhormonehealth.com
  3. Central hypothyroidism is prevalent in about 1 in 2 adults with Cushing’s syndrome, and thyroid function can be restored after curative surgery for most patients, according to study findings. “Our study findings have confirmed and greatly extended previous smaller studies that suggested a link between hypercortisolism and thyroid dysfunction but were inconclusive due to smaller sample size and short follow-up,” Skand Shekhar, MD, an endocrinologist and clinical investigator in the reproductive physiology and pathophysiology group at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, told Healio. “Due to our large sample and longer follow-up, we firmly established a significant negative correlation between hypercortisolemia measures — serum and urinary cortisol, serum adrenocorticotropic hormone — and thyroid hormones triiodothyronine, free thyroxine and thyrotropin.” Shekhar and colleagues conducted a retrospective review of two groups of adults aged 18 to 60 years with Cushing’s syndrome. The first group was evaluated at the NIH Clinical Center from 2005 to 2018 (n = 68; mean age, 43.8 years; 62% white), and the second group was evaluated from 1985 to 1994 (n = 55; mean age, 37.2 years; 89% white). The first cohort was followed for 6 to 12 months to observe the pattern of thyroid hormone changes after surgical cure of adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing’s syndrome. The second group underwent diurnal thyroid-stimulating hormone evaluation before treatment and during remission for some cases. Urinary free cortisol and morning thyroid hormone levels were collected for all participants. In the second group, researchers evaluated diurnal patterns of TSH concentrations with hourly measurements from 3 to 7 p.m. and midnight to 4 p.m. In the first group, adrenocorticotropic hormone and serum cortisol were measured. In the first cohort, seven participants were receiving levothyroxine for previously diagnosed primary or central hypothyroidism. Of the remaining 61 adults, 32 had untreated central hypothyroidism. Thirteen participants had free T4 at the lower limit of normal, and 19 had subnormal levels. There were 29 adults with subnormal levels of T3 and seven with subnormal TSH. Before surgery, 36 participants in the first group had central hypothyroidism. Six months after surgery, central hypothyroidism remained for 10 participants. After 12 months, the number of adults with central hypothyroidism dropped to six. Preoperative T3 and TSH levels were negatively associated with morning and midnight cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone and urinary free cortisol. In post hoc analysis, a baseline urinary free cortisol of more than 1,000 g per day was adversely associated with baseline and 6-month T3 and free T4 levels. In the second group, there were 51 participants not on thyroid-modifying drugs who had a thyroid function test 6 or 12 months after surgery. Before surgery, free T4 levels were subnormal in 17 participants, T3 levels were subnormal in 22, and TSH levels were in the lower half of the reference range or below in all but one participant. After surgery, two participants had below normal free T4, one had subnormal T3, and TSH levels were in the lower half of the reference range or below in 23 of 48 participants. Before surgery, there was no difference in mean TSH between daytime and nighttime. A mean 8 months after surgery, the second group had a normal nocturnal TSH surge from 1.3 mIU/L during the day to 2.17 mIU/L at night (P = .01). The nocturnal TSH increase persisted as long as 3 years in participants who had follow-up evaluations. “We found a very high prevalence of thyroid hormone deficiency that appears to start at the level of the hypothalamus-pituitary gland and extend to the tissue level,” Shekhar said. “Some of these patients may experience thyroid hormone deficiency symptoms, such as fatigue, depression, cold intolerance, weight gain, etc, as a result of systematic and tissue-level thyroid hormone deficiency. We also noted a strong correlation between hypothyroidism and hypogonadism, which implies that hypothyroid patients are also likely to suffer adverse reproductive effects. Thus, it is imperative to perform thorough thyroid hormone assessment in patients with Cushing’s syndrome, and thyroid hormone supplementation should be considered for these patients unless cure of Cushing’s syndrome is imminent.” Researchers said providers should routinely screen for hypothyroidism in adults with Cushing’s syndrome. Even after thyroid function is restored, regular follow-up should also be conducted. Further research is needed to investigate thyroid dysfunction in iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome and the impact of these findings on euthyroid sick syndrome, Shekhar said. For more information: Skand Shekhar, MD, can be reached at skand.shekhar@nih.gov. From https://www.healio.com/news/endocrinology/20210208/thyroid-dysfunction-highly-prevalent-in-cushings-syndrome
  4. Thyroid cancer survival rates are 84 percent for 10 years or more if diagnosed early. Early diagnosis is crucial therefore and spotting the unusual signs could be a matter of life and death. A sign your thyroid cancer has advanced includes Cushing syndrome. What is it? What is Cushing syndrome? Cushing syndrome occurs when your body is exposed to high levels of the hormone cortisol for a long time, said the Mayo Clinic. The health site continued: “Cushing syndrome, sometimes called hypercortisolism, may be caused by the use of oral corticosteroid medication. “The condition can also occur when your body makes too much cortisol on its own. “Too much cortisol can produce some of the hallmark signs of Cushing syndrome — a fatty hump between your shoulders, a rounded face, and pink or purple stretch marks on your skin.” In a study published in the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, thyroid carcinoma and Cushing’s syndrome was further investigated. The study noted: “Two cases of thyroid carcinoma and Cushing's syndrome are reported. “Both of our own cases were medullary carcinomas of the thyroid, and on reviewing the histology of five of the other cases all proved to be medullary carcinoma with identifiable amyloid in the stroma. “A consideration of the temporal relationships of the development of the carcinoma and of Cushing's syndrome suggested that in the two cases with papillary carcinoma these conditions could have been unrelated, but that in eight of the nine cases with medullary carcinoma there was evidence that thyroid carcinoma was present at the time of diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. “Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid is also probably related to this group of tumours. It is suggested that the great majority of the tumours associated with Cushing's syndrome are derived from cells of foregut origin which are endocrine in nature.” In rare cases, adrenal tumours can cause Cushing syndrome a condition arising when a tumour secretes hormones the thyroid wouldn’t normally create. Cushing syndrome associated with medullary thyroid cancer is uncommon. The syndrome is more commonly caused by the pituitary gland overproducing adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), or by taking oral corticosteroid medication. See a GP if you have symptoms of thyroid cancer, warns the NHS. The national health body added: “The symptoms may be caused by less serious conditions, such as an enlarged thyroid, so it's important to get them checked. “A GP will examine your neck and can organise a blood test to check how well your thyroid is working. “If they think you could have cancer or they're not sure what's causing your symptoms, you'll be referred to a hospital specialist for more tests.” Adapted from https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1351753/thyroid-cancer-signs-symptoms-cushing-syndrome
  5. Dr. Friedman wants to update his patients about natural desiccated thyroid (NDT) recalls based on new information from the FDA. Dr. Friedman prescribes various thyroid hormone preparations to his patients with hypothyroidism. This includes natural desiccated thyroid (NDT) of which two preparations are WP Thyroid and Nature-Throid, both made by RLC Labs. On August 25, 2020, RLC Labs announced a voluntary, consumer-level recall of all lots of Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid tablets because some lots contain less than the required 90% of the active ingredient as determined by the FDA. The RLC spokesperson said to Dr. Friedman that one lot of WP Thyroid and 5 lots of Nature-Throid contained between 87% and 90% of the labeled amount of levothyroxine (T4) or liothyronine (T3). Recently the FDA announced which lots are recalled that are listed below. According to the recall, if a patient receives a sub-potent tablet, hypothyroid symptoms may not be controlled. To date, there have been no reports of adverse events related to this recall. Patients who have had an adverse event should contact RLC Labs. The lot numbers are listed on the bottles of Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid. With this information about which lots are recalled, Dr. Friedman is only recommended those taking the effective lots to discontinue them. Currently no lots of Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid tablets are commercially available, so a replacement with the same product is not an option. It is unknown how long it will be before Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid become commercially available. In September 2020, the FDA also announced that two lots (one of 15 mg and one of 120 mg) (see table) of NP Thyroid made by Acella Pharamceuticals were also recalled due to reduced potency between 87% and 90% of the labeled amount of levothyroxine (T4) or liothyronine (T3). Other lots are currently available. The lot numbers are not listed on the Acella product bottles, but the expiration dates are. If patient has one of the products with the expiration date listed, they can ask their pharmacy for the lot number. Dr. Friedman has several comments about these recalls. Dr. Friedman sees them as unfortunate, but still believes NDT is a good option for patients with hypothyroidism. The “subpotent” Nature-Throid, WP Thyroid and NP Thyroid pills are only slightly less potent than stated in that only the effective lots are between 87% and 90% of the T4 and T3 levels. For most patients, they will not have symptoms from these subpotent pills and if they are taking a lot that is subpotent, the dose can be adjusted based on laboratory levels at your next appointment with Dr. Friedman. According to Dr. Friedman, patients taking Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid with the subpotent lots have three options: 1) they can continue taking Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid knowing they may have a subpotent lot and knowing that they may not be able to get a refill at least temporarily. 2) patients can be switched to Armour thyroid, NP thyroid or have a compounding pharmacy compound the equivalent dose using USP grade porcine powder. Please let Dr. Friedman’s office know if you would like to go on a different desiccated thyroid product (and which one) and what pharmacy you would like to use, 3) Dr. Friedman has a small supply of desiccated thyroid with no reclled lots that is available at his clinic for those in Los Angeles on the last Tuesday night of each month. He will not be able to mail desiccated thyroid. Please contact his office about this option. Patients with a subpotent lot of NP thyroid can have their pharmacy switch them to an unaffected lot at no charge. Patients do not need to contact Dr. Friedman, but if you have any questions or need to schedule an appointment with Dr. Friedman, please email us at mail@goodhormonehealth.com or schedule an appointment on his website at www.goodhormonehealth.com.
  6. Dr. Friedman prescribes various thyroid hormone preparations to his patients with hypothyroidism. This includes natural desiccated thyroid (NDT) of which two preparations are WP Thyroid and Nature-Throid, both made by RLC Labs. On August 25, 2020, RLC Labs announced a voluntary, consumer-level recall of all lots of Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid tablets because some lots contain less than the required 90% of the active ingredient as determined by the FDA. The RLC spokesperson said to Dr. Friedman that one lot of WP Thyroid and 5 lots of Nature-Throid contained between 87% and 90% of the labeled amount of levothyroxine (T4) or liothyronine (T3). The recall did not disclose which of the lots were affected and all lots are recalled, not just the affected lots. According to the recall, if a patient receives a sub-potent tablet, hypothyroid symptoms may not be controlled. To date, there have been no reports of adverse events related to this recall. Patients who have had an adverse event should contact RLC Labs. RLC Labs advised that patients should talk to their healthcare professional before they stop taking their Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid medicine. Consumers with questions about the recall can email RLC at recall@rlclabs.com or RLC Customer Service (877) 797-7997. Patients may return unexpired Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid tablets to their pharmacy who are legally required to refund the cost of the tablets. Currently no lots of Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid tablets are commercially available, so a replacement with the same product is not an option. It is unknown how long it will be before Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid become commercially available. Dr. Friedman has several comments about this recall. This is the second recall of desiccated thyroid as some lots of NP thyroid were recalled in May 2020. Dr. Friedman sees this as unfortunate, but still believes desiccated thyroid is a good option for patients with hypothyroidism. Secondly, the “subpotent” Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid pills are only slightly less potent than stated in that only a few lots are between 87% and 90% of the T4 and T3 levels. For most patients, they will not have symptoms from these subpotent pills and if they are taking a lot that is subpotent, the dose can be adjusted based on laboratory levels at your next appointment with Dr. Friedman. According to Dr. Friedman, patients taking Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid have three options: 1) they can continue taking Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid knowing they may have a subpotent lot and knowing that they may not be able to get a refill at least temporarily. 2) patients can be switched to Armour thyroid, NP thyroid or have a compounding pharmacy compound the equivalent dose using USP grade porcine powder. Please let Dr. Friedman’s office know if you would like to go on a different desiccated thyroid product (and which one) and what pharmacy you would like to use, 3) Dr. Friedman has a small supply of desiccated thyroid that is available at his clinic for those in Los Angeles on the last Tuesday night of each month. He will not be able to mail desiccated thyroid. Please contact his office about this option. Patients do not need to contact Dr. Friedman, but if you have any questions or need to schedule an appointment with Dr. Friedman, please email us at mail@goodhormonehealth.com or schedule an appointment on his website at goodhormonehealth.com.
  7. MaryO

    Medical History

    (1865) English physician George Redmayne Murray was born. He is credited with pioneering the treatment of endocrine diseases, which include thyroid cancer.
  8. From http://www.cushie.info/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1146:dr-theodore-F.-interviews&catid=10:media&Itemid=18 Theodore C. F., M.D., Ph.D. has opened a private practice, specializing in treating patients with adrenal, pituitary, thyroid and fatigue disorders. Dr. F. has privileges at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Martin Luther King Medical Center. His practice includes detecting and treating hormone imbalances, including hormone replacement therapy. Dr. F. is also an expert in diagnosing and treating pituitary disorders, including Cushings disease and syndrome. Dr. F.'s career reflects his ongoing quest to better understand and treat endocrine problems. With both medical and research doctoral degrees, he has conducted studies and cared for patients at some of the country's most prestigious institutions, including the University of Michigan, the National Institutes of Health, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and UCLA's Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science. Read Dr. F.'s First Guest Chat, November 11, 2003. Read Dr. F.'s Second Guest Chat, March 2, 2004. Listen to Dr. F. First Live Voice Interview, January 29, 2009. Listen to Dr. F. Second Live Voice Interview, March 12, 2009. Listen to Dr. F. Third Live Voice Interview, February 13, 2011. This post has been promoted to an article
  9. i read an article that was about the many different causes of empty sella one of them being thyroid cancer. it lead me to a link i will post here about an ectopic ACTH source in a vaginal lining malignancy. I have found in my own studies that it is beneficial to be vigilent about rooting out the source of our cushings. some doctors just want to offer multiple band aids. like in my case. doctors suggested removing my pituitary gland or my agrenal glands or trying to sustain me w/tons of insulin & hight blood pressure meds or ketoconazol. they did not get that i had 2 little ones to take care of. i wanted to stop my body from rotting. i knew i had little time left. i did not want agonizing prolongment. i wanted the SOURCE of the cushings hunted down & cut OUT of my body. in my hereditary type of cushings even removing a small portion (debulking) of the tumor, mass, cyst, watever your radiologist wants to call it, can save or add years to your life. it is hard to find such an agressive doctor. in my case it was my sisters who stood up to doctors. demanding they order a full body octreotide scan where they found the source of my cushings, a lung tumor that did not show up on other scans. the tumor can be ANYWHERE in your body. It will produce many different hormones not just ACTH. it can be the size of a spec of dust. Looking for these other tumor markers or hormones in 24hr urine catches besides just cortisol can put us closer to our cure. since i am posting a research link i picked this forum. if it is misplaced i apologize. please see this research link: http://lib.bioinfo.pl/pmid:9190988 our illness is not rare but doctors are not taught how to diagnose it. sometimes they need our help. we need to educate ourselves. my education on this website led to my cure. thank u MaryO for giving us this medium.
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