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Found 13 results

  1. Each month, The Clinical Advisor makes one new clinical feature available ahead of print. Don’t forget to take the poll. The results will be published in the next month’s issue. A 35-year-old woman is seen in the outpatient clinic for evaluation of an incidental pituitary macroadenoma. Her medical history is significant for hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, polycystic ovary syndrome, and obesity. She initially presented to the emergency department (ED) a week ago after an episode of right visual field changes that she described as waviness in her right eye and right hemibody sensory changes without motor deficits. While in the ED, she underwent a full workup for possible stroke, which was negative. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her brain without contrast revealed a 12-mm pituitary lesion; a repeat MRI with contrast was then ordered (Figure). No serum hormonal panel was available for review from ED records. Figure. Magnetic resonance imaging of the case patient. Left image: sagittal view. Right image: coronal view with contrast. Credit: Melissa Wasilenko, MSN, RN Upon further questioning of her medical history during the clinic visit, the patient notes that a few years ago she was attempting to become pregnant and was evaluated by her gynecologist for amenorrhea. At that time, she reportedly completed an endocrine laboratory workup that showed a slightly elevated prolactin level between 30 and 40 ng/mL (normal level in nonpregnant women, <30 ng/mL). Per the patient, the minimal elevation was not enough to concern the gynecologist and no MRI was ordered at that time. Her gynecologist recommended that she lose weight. Her menses returned to normal with weight loss. With a history of disrupted menstrual cycles, infertility, and patient reported elevated prolactin level, there is high suspicion for endocrine disruption. A complete pituitary panel is ordered again to examine the current hormone function considering the recent MRI findings. This revealed a prolactin of 33.7 ng/ml, and all other hormonal levels were within normal limits. Because the patient reports multiple episodes of visual disturbances and the size of the pituitary adenoma on MRI, a neuro-ophthalmology referral is initiated for visual field testing and to determine if the pituitary macroadenoma is causing mass effect and compressing the optic nerve. The neuro-ophthalmologist found she had no visual field defect from her adenoma on visual field testing and believed that her visual disturbances were probably migraine in nature. Discussion Pituitary gland tumors are usually found incidentally on imaging studies obtained for other reasons or in workup of patients with abnormal endocrine hormone levels (both decreased and increased levels) or with symptoms of mass effect from the lesions.1 These tumors are typically benign in nature; cases with malignancy are extremely rare.1 The exact pathophysiology of pituitary adenomas remains unknown but is thought to be linked to heredity, hormonal influences, and genetic mutations.1 Pituitary tumors are commonly found in adults between the ages of 35 and 60 years of age.2,3 The estimated prevalence of pituitary adenomas varies widely by study and findings are typically based on autopsy and radiology data. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program data from 2004 to 2018 show an incidence rate of pituitary adenomas and pituitary incidentalomas of 4.28 ± 0.04 and 1.53 ± 0.02 per 100,000 population.4 Pituitary tumors have been found in 14.4% of unselected autopsy cases and 22.5% of radiology tests.1 The SEER data suggest that incidence rates are similar among women and men but are higher among women in early life and higher among males in later life.5 Rates of prolactinomas (prolactin-secreting tumors) and corticotropinomas (adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting tumors; Cushing disease) are higher in women than men.6 Earlier SEER data showed a significantly higher incidence of pituitary adenomas in Black individuals compared with other racial/ethnic groups; several factors may account for this discrepancy such as the higher stroke rate in this population, which leads to a greater likelihood for brain imaging that detects incident pituitary tumors.5 Incidental findings of pituitary adenoma may be found during workup related to hormonal dysfunction (amenorrhea, galactorrhea, fertility disorders, sexual dysfunction), noticeable vision change, new-onset headaches, or imaging performed for other diagnostic purposes.7 Pituitary Types Pituitary tumor types are differentiated by location, size, and functional status. Pituitary tumors commonly arise from the anterior portion of the gland (adenohypophysis) and rarely from the posterior portion (neurohypophysis).2 Both adenohypophyseal and neurohypophyseal tumors are commonly benign and slow-growing.1 Malignant pituitary tumors account for less than 1% of pituitary lesions and are usually metastases from breast and lung cancers.3 Adenohypophyseal carcinoma is rare, with less than 140 reported cases.2 Pituitary tumors are categorized by the size1,2: Microadenomas (<10 mm) Macroadenomas (>10 mm to 40 mm) Giant adenomas (>40 mm) Pituitary adenomas are further classified as functioning (hormone-secreting) or nonfunctioning (nonsecreting).1,6 If the adenoma is functioning, hormone levels will be found in excess. If the levels are within normal limits, a nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma is suspected. Functioning Tumors Approximately 65% of all pituitary adenomas are functioning tumors.2 Functioning pituitary adenomas present in various ways depending on which hormone is involved and the level of hormone secretion. Prolactinomas are the most common type of functioning adenomas followed by growth hormone-secreting and adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary tumors. Adenomas secreting thyrotropin and follicle-stimulating hormone are less commonly found.2 Clinical features of functional pituitary adenomas are outlined in Table 1.2.8 Table 1. Clinical Features and Laboratory Findings of Functioning Pituitary Adenomas Nonfunctioning Tumors Approximately 20% to 30% of pituitary adenomas are nonfunctional.3 These tumors may go undiagnosed for years until the mass of the tumor starts to effect surrounding structures and causing secondary symptoms such as compression of the optic chiasm causing vision impairments. Nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas and prolactinomas (functioning) are the 2 most common types of pituitary adenomas.2,3 The consulting clinician must understand the difference in pathology of these 2 types of lesions, what diagnostic test to order, how to interpret the test results, and which specialty to refer the patient to best on the initial workup findings. Initial Workup Proper baseline workup should be initiated before referring patients with incidental pituitary adenoma to a specialist. The initial workup includes imaging, blood work to determine if the pituitary adenoma is causing hormonal dysfunction, and neuro-ophthalmology referral for visual field testing to determine if the optic nerve/chiasm is impacted. Imaging The most accurate diagnostic modality of pituitary gland pathology is MRI with and without contrast. The MRI should focus on the hypothalamic-pituitary area and include contrasted imaging to evaluate the soft tissue within the intracranial structure.9 The coronal and sagittal views are the best to display the pituitary gland width and height and identify abnormalities.9 The MRI provides a detailed evaluation of the pituitary gland related to adjacent structures within the skull, which helps to detect microalterations of the pituitary gland.10 If a pituitary adenoma is an incidental finding on another imaging modality (such as a computed tomography scan or MRI without contrast), an MRI with and without contrast that focuses on the pituitary gland should be obtained. Pituitary Laboratory Panel A complete pituitary panel workup should be obtained including prolactin, thyrotropin, free thyroxine, cortisol (fasting), adrenocorticotropic hormone, insulinlike growth factor 1, growth hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol in women, and total testosterone in males.1 Tests should be completed in the morning while fasting for the most accurate results. For instance, normally cortisol levels drop during fasting unless there is abnormality. Table 2 below shows normal laboratory ranges for a complete pituitary panel. Serum prolactin levels can slightly increase in response to changes in sleep, meals, and exercise; emotional distress; psychiatric medications; and oral estrogens. If the initial prolactin level is borderline high (21-40 ng/mL), the test should be repeated. Normal levels are higher in women than in men. Microadenomas may cause slight elevations in prolactin level (ie, <200 ng/mL), while macroadenomas are likely to cause greater elevations (ie, >200 ng/mL).1 Patients with giant prolactinomas typically present with prolactin levels ranging from 1000 ng/mL to 100,000 ng/mL.11 Perimetry Pituitary adenomas may cause ophthalmologic manifestations ranging from impaired visual field to diplopia because of upward displacement of the optic chiasm. The optic chiasm is located above the pituitary gland and a pituitary tumor that grows superiorly can cause compression in this area.12 Optic chiasm compression from a pituitary adenoma commonly causes bitemporal hemianopsia.2 If the tumor volume is promptly reduced by surgical resection or medication (in the case of prolactinomas), initial vision changes due to compression may be reversible.12 Baseline and routine follow-up perimetry are important in patients with pituitary adenoma, as symptoms of optic chiasm compression may go unnoticed by patients as visual field deficits often develop gradually. Also, post-treatment perimetry assessments can be used to compare the initial testing to evaluate reversible visual field deficits. It is recommended that patients with pituitary adenomas (both function and nonfunctiong) receive neuro-ophthalmologic evaluations twice a year to ensure no visual changes have occurred.12 Referral to a Specialist Management of pituitary adenomas requires a multidisciplinary team of specialists including endocrinologists, neurosurgeons, and neuro-ophthalmologists. The type of adenoma governs which specialist patients with incidental adenoma should see first. Patients with functioning pituitary adenomas should be referred to an endocrinologist before a neurosurgeon. The most prevalent functioning adenomas, prolactinoma, are initially treated with dopamine agonist medications.1,6 A patient with prolactinoma would only need to see a neurosurgeon if they have a macroadenoma that is not responsive or only partially responsive to dopamine agonists therapy or is causing vision deficits related to compression of the optic chiasm.2 Patients with nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas should first be referred to a neurosurgeon to discuss surgical options versus observation. The recommended treatment for patients with nonfunctioning adenomas and clinical features of mass effect (ie, visual deficits) is surgery.1,6 If the patient is asymptomatic with no signs of visual field deficits, the neurosurgery team may recommend continued surveillance with serial imaging and serial perimetry screenings.12 The patient in the case was found to have a nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (prolactin was 33.7 ng/mL). Neuro-ophthalmology did not find any visual field defect upon initial assessment; the patient decided to continue observation with serial imaging (MRI) and serial neuro-ophthalmology assessments. Serial imaging with MRI brain revealed slow but real progression of the pituitary macroadenoma (12 mm initially; 13 mm 6 months later; and 14 mm 1 year from initial MRI findings). Although the patient still did not have any visual field defects per the neuro-ophthalmology reassessments, the documented growth on MRI over a short period of time was enough to make the patient more amendable to surgical resection. The patient underwent trans-sphenoidal resection of the pituitary lesion approximately 16 months after discovery of the tumor. Conclusion A thorough workup including laboratory testing, imaging, and vision field testing is the foundation of an effective referral process for pituitary adenomas and guides which specialist is consulted first. If patients are referred before initial workup is completed, delays in care, unnecessary specialty visits, and increased overall health care costs may occur. Melissa Wasilenko, MSN, RN, is a registered nurse at Lyerly Neurosurgery in Jacksonville, Florida. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in nursing practice with a focus in family medicine at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville. References 1. Russ S, Anastasopoulou C, Shafiq I. Pituitary adenoma. 2021 Jul 18. In: StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan–. Updated July 18, 2021. 2. Greenberg MS. Tumors of non-neural origin. In: Handbook of Neurosurgery, 9th ed. Thieme Medical Publishers: 2019; 1655-1755 3. Yeung M, Tahir F. The pathology of the pituitary, parathyroids, thyroid and adrenal glands. Surgery. 2020;38(12):747-757. 4. Watanabe G, Choi SY, Adamson DC. Pituitary incidentalomas in the United States: a national database estimate. World Neurosurg. 2021:S1878-8750(21)01780-0. doi:10.1016/j.wneu.2021.11.079 5. McDowell BD, Wallace RB, Carnahan RM, Chrischilles EA, Lynch CF, Schlechte JA. Demographic differences in incidence for pituitary adenoma. Pituitary. 2011;14(1):23-30. doi:10.1007/s11102-010-0253-4 6. Molitch ME. Diagnosis and treatment of pituitary adenomas: a review. JAMA. 2017;317(5):516-524. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.19699 7. Yao S, Lin P, Vera M, et al. Hormone levels are related to functional compensation in prolactinomas: a resting-state fMRI study. J Neurol Sci. 2020;411:116720. doi:10.1016/j.jns.2020.116720 8. Beck-Peccoz P, Persani L, Lania A. Thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma. In: Feingold KR, Anawalt B, Boyce A, et al, ed. Endotext. MDText.com, Inc.; 2019. 9. Yadav P, Singhal S, Chauhan S, Harit S. MRI evaluation of size and shape of normal pituitary gland: age and sex related changes. J Clin Diagnostic Research. 2017;11(12):1-4. doi:10.7860/JCDR/2017/31034.10933 10. Varrassi M, Cobianchi Bellisari F, Bruno F, et al. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging at 3T of pituitary gland: advantages and pitfalls. Gland Surg. 2019;8(Suppl 3):S208-S215. doi:10.21037/gs.2019.06.08 11. Shimon I. Giant prolactinomas. Neuroendocrinology. 2019;109(1):51-56. doi:10.1159/000495184 12. Vié AL, Raverot G. Modern neuro-ophthalmological evaluation of patients with pituitary disorders. Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2019;33(2):101279. doi:10.1016/j.beem.2019.05.003 From the March/April 2022 Issue of Clinical Advisor
  2. 1. In patients with benign adrenal tumors, women are more likely to be diagnosed with mild autonomous cortisol secretion (MACS). 2. Patients with MACS have a higher prevalence and severity of cardiometabolic disease, namely hypertension and type 2 diabetes. Evidence Rating Level: 2 (Good) Study Rundown: While benign adrenal tumors are routinely incidentally discovered by imaging, not all these tumors have pathological effects, existing as nonfunctional adrenal tumors (NFAT). However, others overproduce steroids resulting in mild autonomous cortisol secretion (MACS) or Cushing’s syndrome (CS) if severe. The clinical impact of these diseases on cardiometabolic disease is poorly described. This study, therefore, sought to characterize the cardiometabolic disease burden and steroid excretion in this population via a cross-sectional study. Patients with benign adrenal tumors were classified with NFAT, MACS-1 (possible), MACS-2 (definite), or CS based upon clinical assessment and 1-mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test. Results revealed that MACS-2 and CS were more prevalent among women. Compared to patients in the NFAT group, patients with MACS-2 and CS were more likely to have hypertension, require antihypertensives, type 2 diabetes, and require insulin therapy. Taken together, this study supports that women with benign adrenal tumors are more likely to be diagnosed with MACS and are consequently at greater risk for hypertension and type 2 diabetes, warranting regular cardiometabolic assessment for this population. This study was limited by its cross-sectional study design and predefined clinical outcomes biased for cardiometabolic outcomes. Click to read the study in Annals of Internal Medicine Relevant Reading: Natural History of Adrenal Incidentalomas With and Without Mild Autonomous Cortisol Excess: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis In-Depth [cross-sectional study]: In this prospective, cross-sectional study, 1305 patients diagnosed with incidental benign adrenal adrenocortical adenoma were selected across 14 participating centers. Patients with other diagnoses of cortisol excess such as primary aldosteronism or on cortisol-altering medications were excluded. Following clinical assessment and 1-mg overnight dexamethasone-suppression, patients were categorized into having a nonfunctional adrenal tumor (NFAT) (morning serum cortisol <50 nmol/L), possible mild autonomous cortisol secretion (MACS-1) (morning serum cortisol: 50-138 nmol/L), definite MACS (MACS-2) (morning serum cortisol: >138 nmol/L), or Cushing’s syndrome (CS) (presence of overt clinical symptoms of CS). The results found that while women made up the majority of the study cohort (67.3%), the proportion of females was more pronounced in the MACS-2 (73.6%) and CS (86.2%) groups. With respect to cardiometabolic disease, patients in the MACS-2 group were more likely to have hypertension (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR], 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.27), require three or more hypertensives (aPR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.02-1.68) and requirement for insulin therapy (aPR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.01 – 3.52) when compared to patients in the NFAT group. The same trend was found with greater significance for those in the CS group. The prevalence of dyslipidemia was not found to be significantly different between all groups. Additionally, these findings were not found to be attributed to other factors such as 1-mg DSG results, the presence of bilateral tumor, or adrenal tumor size. Finally, urinary steroid profiling found that patients with MACS and CS were more likely to have lower excretion levels of androgen metabolites and increased excretion levels of glucocorticoids. Overall, this study supports increased cardiometabolic disease burden amongst women with MACS. RELATED REPORTS Autonomous cortisol secretion correlated with mortality for adrenal incidentalomas Mutations in PKA catalytic subunit associated with Cushing’s syndrome Image: PD ©2022 2 Minute Medicine, Inc. All rights reserved. No works may be reproduced without expressed written consent from 2 Minute Medicine, Inc. Inquire about licensing here. No article should be construed as medical advice and is not intended as such by the authors or by 2 Minute Medicine, Inc. Tags: adrenal incidentalomaautonomouscardiometabolic diseasecortisol secretioncushing's syndromedexamethasone suppression From https://www.2minutemedicine.com/women-with-mild-autonomous-cortisol-secretion-are-at-greater-risk-for-cardiometabolic-disease/
  3. Justine Herndon, PA-C, and Irina Bancos, MD, on Post-Operative Cushing Syndrome Care – Curative procedures led to widespread resolution or improvement of hyperglycemia by Scott Harris , Contributing Writer, MedPage Today January 18, 2022 In a recent study, two-thirds of people with Cushing syndrome (CS) saw resolved or improved hyperglycemia after a curative procedure, with close post-operative monitoring an important component of the process. Among 174 patients with CS included in the longitudinal cohort study (pituitary in 106, ectopic in 25, adrenal in 43), median baseline HbA1c was 6.9%. Of these, 41 patients were not on any therapy for hyperglycemia, 93 (52%) took oral medications, and 64 (37%) were on insulin. At the end of the period following CS remission (median 10.5 months), 37 (21%) patients had resolution of hyperglycemia, 82 (47%) demonstrated improvement, and 55 (32%) had no change or worsened hyperglycemia. Also at the end of follow-up, HbA1c had fallen 0.84% (P<0.0001), with daily insulin dose decreasing by a mean of 30 units (P<0.0001). Justine Herndon, PA-C, and Irina Bancos, MD, both endocrinology researchers with Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, served as co-authors of the report, which was published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society. Here they discuss the study and its findings with MedPage Today. The exchange has been edited for length and clarity. What was the study's main objective? Herndon: As both a hospital diabetes provider and clinic pituitary/gonadal/adrenal provider, I often hear questions from colleagues about how to manage a patient's diabetes post-operatively after cure from CS. While clinical experience has been helpful in guiding these discussions, the literature offered a paucity of data on diabetes/hyperglycemia specifically after surgery. There was also a lack of data on specific subgroups of CS, whether by sub-type or severity. Therefore, we felt it was important to see what our past patient experiences showed in terms of changes in laboratory data, medications, and which patients were more likely to see improvement in their diabetes/hyperglycemia. The overall goal was to help clinicians provide appropriate patient education and care following a curative procedure. In addition to its primary findings, the study also identified several factors associated with resolution or improvement of hyperglycemia. What were these factors? Bancos: Both clinical and biochemical severity of CS, as well as Cushing subtype, were associated with improvement. We calculated severity based on symptoms and presence of comorbidities, and we calculated biochemical severity based on hormonal measurements. As clinical and biochemical scores were strongly correlated, we chose only one (biochemical) for multivariable analysis. In the multivariable analysis of biochemical severity of Cushing, subtype of Cushing, and subtype of hyperglycemia, we found that patients with a severe biochemical severity score were 2.4 fold more likely to see improved hyperglycemia than people with a moderate or mild severity score (OR 2.4 (95% CI 1.1-4.9). We also found that patients with the nonadrenal CS subtype were 2.9 fold more likely to see improved hyperglycemia when compared to people with adrenal CS (OR of 2.9 (95% CI 1.3-6.4). The type of hyperglycemia (diabetes versus prediabetes) was not found to be significant. Did anything surprise you about the study results? Herndon: I was surprised to see improvement in hyperglycemia in patients who were still on steroids, as you would expect the steroids to still have an impact. This shows how much a CS curative procedure truly leads to changes in the comorbidities that were a result of the underlying disease. Also, I was surprised that the type of hyperglycemia was not a predictor of improvement after cure, although it was quite close. We also had a few patients whose hyperglycemia worsened, and we could not find a specific factor that predicted which patients did not improve. What are the study's implications for clinicians who treat people with CS? Bancos: We think our study shows the clear need for closer follow-up -- more frequently than the typical three-to-six months for diabetes. This can be accomplished through review of more than just HbA1c, such as reviewing blood glucose logbooks, asking about hypoglycemia symptoms, and so forth. Patients with severe CS who are being treated with insulin or hypoglycemic medications are especially likely to decrease their medications to avoid hypoglycemia during postoperative period. Read the study here. Bancos reported advisory board participation and/or consulting with Strongbridge, Sparrow Pharmaceutics, Adrenas Therapeutics, and HRA Pharma outside the submitted work. Herndon did not disclose any relevant financial relationships with industry. Primary Source Journal of the Endocrine Society Source Reference: Herndon J, et al "The effect of curative treatment on hyperglycemia in patients with Cushing syndrome" J Endocrine Soc 2022; 6(1): bvab169. From https://www.medpagetoday.com/reading-room/endocrine-society/adrenal-disorders/96709
  4. Millions of people are at increased risk of type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure and don't even know it, due to a hidden hormone problem in their bodies. As many as 1 in 10 people have a non-cancerous tumor on one or both of their adrenal glands that could cause the gland to produce excess amounts of the stress hormone cortisol. Up to now, doctors have thought that these tumors had little impact on your health. But a new study out of Britain has found that up to half of people with these adrenal tumors are secreting enough excess cortisol to raise their risk of diabetes and high blood pressure. Nearly 1.3 million adults in the United Kingdom alone could suffer from this disorder, which is called Mild Autonomous Cortisol Secretion (MACS), the researchers said. Anyone found with one of these adrenal tumors should be screened to see if their health is at risk, said senior researcher Dr. Wiebke Arlt, director of the University of Birmingham Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research in England. "People who are found to have an adrenal tumor should undergo assessment for cortisol excess and if they are found to suffer from cortisol overproduction they should be regularly screened for type 2 diabetes and hypertension and receive treatment if appropriate," Arlt said. These tumors are usually discovered during imaging scans of the abdomen to treat other illnesses, said Dr. André Lacroix, an endocrinologist at the University of Montreal Hospital Center, who wrote an editorial accompanying the study. Both were published Jan. 4 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Adrenal glands primarily produce the hormone adrenaline, but they are also responsible for the production of a number of other hormones, including cortisol, Lacroix said. Cortisol is called the "fight-or-flight" hormone, and can cause blood sugar levels to rise and blood pressure to surge -- usually in response to some perceived bodily threat. Previous studies had indicated that about 1 in 3 adrenal tumors secrete excess cortisol, and an even lower number caused cortisol levels to rise so high that they affected health, researchers said in background notes. But this new study of more than 1,300 people with adrenal tumors found that previous estimates were wrong. About half of these patients had excess cortisol due to their adrenal tumors. Further, more than 15% had levels high enough to impact their health, compared to those with truly benign tumors. MACS patients were more likely to be diagnosed with high blood pressure, and were as much as twice as likely to be on three or more blood pressure medications. They also were more likely to have type 2 diabetes, and were twice as likely to require insulin to manage their blood sugar, the study found. "This study clearly shows that mild cortisol production is more frequent than we thought before, and that the more cortisol you produce, the more likely to you are to have consequences such as diabetes and hypertension," Lacroix said. About 70% of people with MACS were women, and most were of postmenopausal age, the researchers said. "Adrenal tumor-related cortisol excess is an important previously overlooked health issue that particularly affects women after the menopause," Arlt said. Lacroix agreed that guidelines should be changed so that people with adrenal tumors are regularly screened. "Everybody who is found to have an adrenal nodule larger than 1 centimeter needs to be screened to see if they're producing excess hormone or not," he said. "That's very clear." A number of medications can reduce cortisol overproduction or block cortisol action, if an adrenal tumor is found to be causing an excess of hormone. People with severe cortisol excess can even have one of their two adrenal glands removed if necessary, Lacroix said. "It is quite possible to live completely normally with one adrenal gland," he said. More information The Cleveland Clinic has more about adrenal tumors. SOURCES: Wiebke Arlt, MD, DSc, director, Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, U.K.; André Lacroix, MD, endocrinologist, University of Montreal Hospital Center; Annals of Internal Medicine, Jan. 4, 2022 From https://consumer.healthday.com/1-4-benign-adrenal-gland-tumors-might-cause-harm-to-millions-2656172346.html
  5. By Ed Miseta, Chief Editor, Clinical Leader Follow Me On Twitter @EdClinical Sparrow Pharmaceuticals is an emerging biopharma company on a mission to help patients suffering from an excess of corticosteroids, with a focus on Cushing’s syndrome, autonomous cortisol secretion (ACS), and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). Cushing’s and ACS are both caused by an excess of cortisol produced by tumors. Patients with Cushing’s can present physically with a fatty hump between their shoulders, a rounded face, and pink or purple stretch marks on their skin. Cushing’s syndrome and ACS can both result in high blood pressure, bone loss, type 2 diabetes, weight gain, and mood, cognition, and sleep disorders. Any of those symptoms may be side effects for patients with conditions such as PMR who rely on long-term treatment with corticosteroid medications such as prednisone. “Cushing’s syndrome impacts around 20,000 patients in the U.S. alone,” says David Katz, Chief Scientific Officer for Sparrow. “Approximately 50% of those patients can be cured by surgery, but some will develop another tumor years later. ACS is an under-recognized condition, but it may affect up to 3 million patients in the U.S. There are also around 2 million people in the U.S. who rely on long-term use of corticosteroid medications to control autoimmune diseases and other conditions.” The treatments being developed by Sparrow are based on recognition that cortisol and corticosteroid medications are activated in certain tissues such as the liver, bone, fat, and brain, where in excess they act to cause toxicity. The company’s investigational drugs inhibit HSD-1, the enzyme responsible for that activation. Sparrow is about to launch a Phase 2 trial for Cushing’s syndrome. In early 2022 the company will also begin two additional Phase 2 trials for ACS and PMR, a common autoimmune disease in elderly patients. PMR is an arthritic syndrome characterized by a phenomenon known as claudication, which means the more you use a limb, the more it hurts and the harder it is to use. “For example, the more a PMR patient walks, the more painful and stiff their legs will become,” says Katz. “If they're trying to do anything with their arms, the arms will get stiffer and more painful. The disease is pretty debilitating in terms of physical function. The only approved treatment for PMR is steroids, which have side effects such as diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis, and fractures.” Unknown Clinical Challenges Katz is excited about the clinical trials for ACS and PMR because no sizable interventional trials have been reported in either of those conditions. “We're going into a completely new area, and we don't know what we're going to encounter in terms of patient recruitment and retention,” says Katz. “There is also no strong precedent for how to get approval for a drug in these conditions. The only treatment indicated for PMR is steroids, and that came without any efficacy clinical trials. There are no drugs approved for ACS. It’s hard to anticipate the challenges we will face when we are in an area that is very new.” Patient centricity is a topic that is very important to Katz, and he spends a lot of time thinking about how to make trials a more pleasant experience for patients by limiting the burden placed on them. He notes that can sometimes be a difficult trade-off because of the procedures that must be performed to meet regulatory standards. “In Cushing’s syndrome clinical care and clinical trials, the standard way for someone's cortisol level to be measured is a 24-hour urine collection,” states Katz. “That involves looking at the amount of cortisol in the urine over a 24-hour period. That collection is inconvenient and burdensome, and the patient must then carry it somewhere to be analyzed.” Sparrow hopes to shift that collection to a spot urine sample, like what patients would experience during a physical. The patient would urinate into a cup and hand it off to a clinic employee for analysis. The process would be much simpler and less burdensome for the patient. Sparrow will first need to prove that in a clinical trial the spot sample will work as well or better than the 24-hour collection. Subjects in the initial clinical trials will have to contribute the 24-hour collections so that Sparrow can demonstrate that future patients will not need to do so. The Future of Endocrinology Katz has a positive outlook on the future of endocrinology. Sparrow’s leading drug candidate, SPI-62, is an oral, small-molecule HSD-1 inhibitor. In four clinical trials, it demonstrated potent targeting of HSD-1 in both the brain and liver, and significantly lowered cortisol levels in the liver. The studies also showed a favorable safety and tolerability profile. “If we are successful at developing SPI-62, I believe it will change the field of endocrinology,” says Katz. “We aim to shift the focus in Cushing’s syndrome to intracellular cortisol as the main driver of symptoms. What I mean by that is if we find that SPI-62 substantially reduces symptoms and that the degree of inhibition of our target HSD-1 correlates well with clinical improvement, then we can get to a new standard of care. We can potentially get rid of the 24-hour urine collections, which will be a big relief to patients. Additionally, many of today's drugs have a side effect called adrenal insufficiency, which results when the drugs either reduce cortisol too much or completely block activity. Many of today's drugs also require frequent monitoring and dose titration to prevent adrenal insufficiency. We believe that with HSD-1 inhibition we might avoid adrenal insufficiency as well.” Katz is hopeful patients treated with SPI-62 will not require monitoring and dose titration. That proof will take years and lots of clinical trials. Sparrow may also produce the first targeted therapy for ACS. That could improve the recognition of ACS as a prevalent form of hypercortisolism and a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality. “ACS is probably the most under-recognized condition in endocrinology based on recent epidemiological studies,” adds Katz. “It's possible that as few as 3% of patients who have ACS actually have a diagnosis. That is shocking for a condition that is associated with a lot of cardiometabolic and bone morbidity, negative effects on mood and cognition, sleep, and muscle strength, and is associated with excess mortality. We want to bring attention to this condition by bringing out a targeted therapy to treat a spectrum of symptoms by getting to the root cause of them.” From https://www.clinicalleader.com/doc/sparrow-pharmaceuticals-hopes-to-change-the-future-of-endocrinology-0001
  6. What You Need to Know COVID-19 Vaccine booster shots are available for the following Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine recipients who completed their initial series at least 6 months ago and are: 65 years and older Age 18+ who live in long-term care settings Age 18+ who have underlying medical conditions Age 18+ who work in high-risk settings Age 18+ who live in high-risk settings Those "underlying medical conditions" include diabetes and obesity.
  7. As of September 1, 2021, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which is the virus responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has infected over 219 million and caused the deaths of over 4.5 million worldwide. Although COVID-19 has been traditionally associated with its ability to cause varied symptoms resembling acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), emerging scientific evidence has demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 causes much more damage beyond its effects on the upper respiratory tract. To this end, in a recent study published in Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, the researchers discuss the extra-pulmonary manifestations of COVID-19. Risk factors for severe COVID-19 It is now a well-known fact that the likelihood of people falling severely ill or dying from COVID-19 is increases if these individuals are obese, or have certain comorbidities like diabetes mellitus (DM), vitamin D deficiency, and vertebral fractures (VFs). Any abnormality in the pituitary gland may lead to metabolic disorders, impaired immunity, and a host of other conditions that also make the body susceptible to infections. Since such conditions are common in patients with COVID-19 as well, it has been hypothesized that there might be a relationship between COVID-19 and pituitary gland disorders. On the other hand, researchers have also observed that COVID-19 causes increased severity of pituitary-related disorders, and even pituitary apoplexy, which is a condition defined as internal bleeding or impaired blood supply in the pituitary gland. A group of Italian researchers has reviewed this bidirectional relationship between the pituitary gland abnormalities and COVID-19 in their study recently published in Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders. The link between pituitary gland abnormalities and COVID19 The pituitary gland releases hormones that regulate and control some of the most important functions of the body like growth, metabolism, energy levels, bone health, mood swings, vision, reproduction, and immunity, to name a few. The inability of the pituitary gland to release one or more of these hormones is known as ‘hypopituitarism.’ Factors responsible for hypopituitarism include traumatic brain injury, pituitary adenomas (tumors), genetic mutations, as well as infiltrative and infectious diseases. Hypopituitarism can lead to severe cases of DM, growth hormone deficiency (GHD), abnormal lipid profile, obesity, arterial hypertension, and immune dysfunctions. Interestingly, similar consequences of COVID-19 have also been reported. SARS-CoV-2 infects the human body by binding to a special class of receptors known as the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors. These receptors are located in the endothelial linings of most organs like the brain, heart, lungs, kidneys, intestine, liver, and pancreas, among others. The main function of the ACE2 receptors is binding to specific target molecules to maintain the renin-angiotensin system that is crucial for regulating dilation of blood vessels, as well as maintain blood glucose levels, the immune system, and homeostasis. Therefore, SARS-CoV-2 binding to these ACE2 receptors facilitates the entry of this virus into all the organs that have these receptors, thus leading to the ability of SARS-CoV-2 to cause widespread damage in the body. Upon entry into the pancreas, for example, SARS-CoV-2 can inhibit ß-cells function, which worsens hyperglycemia and increases the risk for acute diabetic complications. Similarly, the presence of ACE2 receptors in brain tissues may cause invasion into the pituitary gland and lead to pituitary apoplexy. The entry of SARS-CoV-2 into the brain can also cause neurological damage in infected patients, which may account for some of the common neurological complaints of COVID-19 including headaches, confusion, dysgeusia, anosmia, nausea, and vomiting. Study findings Hypopituitarism leading to metabolic syndrome has been scientifically linked to higher mortality in COVID-19 patients. In fact, the presence of a single metabolic syndrome component has been observed to double the risk of death by COVID-19. This risk was even higher among patients with DM and hypertension. There was also an increased incidence of VFs in COVID-19 patients with hypopituitarism. Hence, patients with DM, obesity, hypertension, and chronic inflammatory disease, are all at an increased risk of poor outcomes and death in COVID-19. Arterial hypertension is a common finding in adults with GHD, which is another consequence of hypopituitarism. Hypopituitarism also causes adrenal insufficiency, a condition that is primarily managed with glucocorticoids and hormonal replacement therapies. Notably, patients with COVID-19 are often treated for prolonged periods with high-dose exogenous glucocorticoids, which is a class of steroids that suppress some activities of the immune system. This treatment approach may result in suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary–adrenal axis that can lead to adrenal insufficiency. Hypogonadism is another aspect of pituitary insufficiency that predisposes patients, especially males, to COVID-19. Evidence shows that males with hypogonadism were more frequently affected by metabolic syndrome. Pituitary apoplexy, albeit rare, has also been linked to COVID-19, especially in patients with pituitary adenomas and those who are being treated with anticoagulant therapy. This may be because the pituitary gland becomes overstimulated during an infectious disease, which may increase pituitary blood demand and lead to sudden infarction precipitating acute apoplexy. This phenomenon has also been shown in patients suffering from infectious diseases that cause hemorrhagic fevers. Taken together, pituitary apoplexy complicates treatment and management procedures in COVID-19 patients. Despite the use of steroids in COVID-19 patients, there have been no contraindications for vaccination in such patients. However, those on extensive hormonal therapies need constant monitoring for best results. Implications The pituitary gland acts like a double-edged sword for COVID-19. On one end, hypopituitarism predisposes patients to metabolic disorders like DM, obesity, and VFs, all of which are known risk factors for COVID-19. On the other hand, COVID-19 may cause direct or indirect damage to the pituitary glands by entering the brain and inducing unfavorable vascular events – though evidence on this remains lesser in comparison to that of hypopituitarism. Ultimately, the researchers of the current study conclude that managing patients with hormonal insufficiencies optimally with steroids is likely to improve outcomes in severe COVID-19. Journal reference: Frara, S., Loli, P., Allora, A., et al. (2021). COVID-19 and hypopituitarism. Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders. doi:10.1007/s11154-021-09672-y. https://rd.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11154-021-09672-y#citeas. From https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210905/Hypopituitarism-and-COVID-19-e28093-exploring-a-possible-bidirectional-relationship.aspx
  8. Dr. Friedman is getting a lot of emails on booster shots versus third shots. Third shots are for immuno-compromised patients that the FDA is recommending for a small group of patients The FDA also has the intention to soon make booster doses widely available to all healthy individuals. I am writing to clarify the difference between booster shots and third doses. Third Doses for Immuno-Compromised Patients The purpose of a third dose of mRNA vaccine is to give immuno-compromised patients the same level of protection that two doses provide someone who has a normal immune system. It is recommended that the following people get a third dose Been receiving cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system Received a stem cell transplant within the last two years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system Been diagnosed with moderate or severe immunodeficiency conditions (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome) An advanced or untreated HIV infection Been under active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids (> 20 mg of prednisone or 100 mg of hydrocortisone) or other drugs that may suppress immune response Dr. Friedman thinks it is unlikely that any of his patients have these conditions. Patients with Cushing’s syndrome, Addison’s, diabetes or thyroid disorders do not qualify. In contrast, a Booster Dose is for Patients With Healthy Immune Systems A booster dose—which is different from a third dose for immuno-compromised patients—is for healthy patients and is meant to enhance immunity and may protect against new variants of the virus. The Biden administration has announced that it intends to make booster doses available for people with healthy immune systems in September 2021, after they are authorized or approved by the FDA. This has not happened yet, but when it happens, Dr. Friedman would encourage his patients to get it. Dr. Friedman is expecting a booster shot against the Delta variant to be released in the fall of 2021 and would recommend that for his patients. Dr. Friedman wishes everyone to stay healthy.
  9. This article was originally published here Endocrinol Diabetes Metab Case Rep. 2021 May 1;2021:EDM210038. doi: 10.1530/EDM-21-0038. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT SUMMARY: In this case report, we describe the management of a patient who was admitted with an ectopic ACTH syndrome during the COVID pandemic with new-onset type 2 diabetes, neutrophilia and unexplained hypokalaemia. These three findings when combined should alert physicians to the potential presence of Cushing’s syndrome (CS). On admission, a quick diagnosis of CS was made based on clinical and biochemical features and the patient was treated urgently using high dose oral metyrapone thus allowing delays in surgery and rapidly improving the patient’s clinical condition. This resulted in the treatment of hyperglycaemia, hypokalaemia and hypertension reducing cardiovascular risk and likely risk for infection. Observing COVID-19 pandemic international guidelines to treat patients with CS has shown to be effective and offers endocrinologists an option to manage these patients adequately in difficult times. LEARNING POINTS: This case report highlights the importance of having a low threshold for suspicion and investigation for Cushing’s syndrome in a patient with neutrophilia and hypokalaemia, recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes especially in someone with catabolic features of the disease irrespective of losing weight. It also supports the use of alternative methods of approaching the diagnosis and treatment of Cushing’s syndrome during a pandemic as indicated by international protocols designed specifically for managing this condition during Covid-19. PMID:34013889 | DOI:10.1530/EDM-21-0038 From https://www.docwirenews.com/abstracts/rapid-control-of-ectopic-cushings-syndrome-during-the-covid-19-pandemic-in-a-patient-with-chronic-hypokalaemia/
  10. High blood sugar or glucose, also called hyperglycemia, occurs when there is too much sugar in the blood. High blood sugar is the primary symptom that underlies diabetes, but it can also occur in people who don’t have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, either because of stress or trauma, or gradually as a result of certain chronic conditions. It is important to manage high blood sugar, even if you don’t have diabetes, because elevated blood glucose can delay your ability to heal, increase your risk of infections, and cause irreversible damage to your nerves, blood vessels, and organs, such as your eyes and kidneys. Blood vessel damage from high blood sugar also increases your risk of heart attack and stroke. Non-Diabetic Hyperglycemia and Prediabetes You are considered to have impaired glucose tolerance or prediabetes if you have a fasting glucose level between 100–125 mg/dL, and hyperglycemia if your fasting blood glucose level is greater than 125 mg/dL, or greater than 180 mg/dL one to two hours after eating. The body obtains glucose mainly through carbohydrate consumption, but also through the breakdown of glycogen to glucose—a process called glycogenolysis—or conversion of non-carbohydrate sources to glucose—called gluconeogenesis—that primarily occurs in the liver. While 50% to 80% of glucose is used by the brain, kidneys, and red blood cells for energy, the remaining supply of glucose is used to produce energy. It is stored as glycogen in the liver and muscles, and can be tapped into at a later time for energy or converted into fat tissue. In healthy people, blood glucose levels are regulated by the hormone insulin to stay at a steady level of 80–100 mg/dL. Insulin maintains steady blood sugar by increasing the uptake and storage of glucose and decreasing inflammatory proteins that raise blood sugar when there is an excess of glucose in the blood. Certain conditions can increase your blood glucose levels by impairing the ability of insulin to transport glucose out of the bloodstream. When this occurs, you develop hyperglycemia, which puts you at an increased risk of prediabetes, diabetes, and related complications. Common Causes Cushing’s Syndrome Cushing’s syndrome results from excess secretion of the adrenocorticotropic hormone, a hormone produced in the anterior portion of the pituitary gland that causes excess cortisol to be produced and released from the adrenal glands. Pituitary adenomas, or tumors of the pituitary gland, are the cause of Cushing’s syndrome in more than 70% of cases, while prolonged use of corticosteroid medication can also significantly increase the risk. People with Cushing’s syndrome are at an increased risk of developing impaired glucose tolerance and hyperglycemia as a result of increased levels of cortisol throughout the body. Cortisol is a hormone that counteracts the effects of insulin by blocking the uptake of glucose from the bloodstream, thereby increasing insulin resistance and maintaining high blood sugar levels. Elevated cortisol levels also partially decrease the release of insulin from where it is produced in the pancreas. Approximately 10% to 30% of people with Cushing’s syndrome will develop impaired glucose tolerance, while 40% to 45% will develop diabetes. Corticosteroid medication is often prescribed to decrease inflammation throughout the body, but can lead to the development of Cushing’s syndrome and hyperglycemia because it activates specific enzymes that increase the conversion of non-carbohydrate molecules into glucose (gluconeogenesis). Corticosteroids also disrupt pancreatic cell function by inhibiting cell signaling pathways involved in the release of insulin from the pancreas. Read other causes at https://www.verywellhealth.com/causes-blood-sugar-rise-in-non-diabetics-5120349
  11. Some of the latest research advancements in the field of endocrinology presented at the Endocrine Society's virtual ENDO 2021 meeting included quantifying diabetic ketoacidosis readmission rates, hyperglycemia as a severe COVID-19 predictor, and semaglutide as a weight loss therapy. Below are a few more research highlights: More Safety Data on Jatenzo In a study of 81 men with hypogonadism -- defined as a serum testosterone level below 300 ng/dL -- oral testosterone replacement therapy (Jatenzo) was both safe and effective in a manufacturer-sponsored study. After 24 months of oral therapy, testosterone concentration increased from an average baseline of 208.3 ng/dL to 470.1 ng/dL, with 84% of patients achieving a number in the eugonadal range. And importantly, the treatment also demonstrated liver safety, as there were no significant changes in liver function tests throughout the 2-year study -- including alanine aminotransferase (28.0 ± 12.3 to 26.6 ± 12.8 U/L), aspartate transaminase (21.8 ± 6.8 to 22.0 ± 8.2 U/L), and bilirubin levels (0.58 ± 0.22 to 0.52 ± 0.19 mg/dL). Throughout the trial, only one participant had elevation of liver function tests. "Our study finds testosterone undecanoate is an effective oral therapy for men with low testosterone levels and has a safety profile consistent with other approved testosterone products, without the drawbacks of non-oral modes of administration," said lead study author Ronald Swerdloff, MD, of the Lundquist Research Institute in Torrance, California, in a statement. In addition, for many men with hypogonadism, "an oral option is preferred to avoid issues associated with other modes of administration, such as injection site pain or transference to partners and children," he said. "Before [testosterone undecanoate] was approved, the only orally approved testosterone supplemental therapy in the United States was methyltestosterone, which was known to be associated with significant chemical-driven liver damage." Oral testosterone undecanoate received FDA approval in March 2019 following a rocky review history. COVID-19 Risk With Adrenal Insufficiency Alarming new data suggested that children with adrenal insufficiency were more than 23 times more likely to die from COVID-19 than kids without this condition (relative risk 23.68, P<0.0001). This equated to 11 deaths out of 1,328 children with adrenal insufficiency compared with 215 deaths out of 609,788 children without this condition (0.828% vs 0.035%). These young patients with adrenal insufficiency also saw a much higher rate of sepsis (RR 21.68, P<0.0001) and endotracheal intubation with COVID-19 infection (RR 25.45, P<0.00001). Data for the analysis were drawn from the international TriNetX database, which included patient records of children ages 18 and younger diagnosed with COVID-19 from 60 healthcare organizations in 31 different countries. "It's really important that you take your hydrocortisone medications and start stress dosing as soon as you're sick," study author Manish Raisingani, MD, of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and Arkansas Children's in Little Rock, explained during a press conference. "This will help prevent significant complications due to COVID-19 or any other infections. A lot of the complications that we see in kids with adrenal insufficiency are due to inadequate stress dosing of steroids." And with kids starting to return back to in-person schooling, "parents should also be reeducated about using the emergency injections of hydrocortisone," Raisingani added. He noted that the COVID-19 complication rates were likely so high in this patient population because many had secondary adrenal insufficiency due to being on long-term, chronic steroids. Many also had comorbid respiratory illnesses, as well. Cushing's Death Risk In a systematic review and meta-analysis of 87 studies -- including data on 17,276 patients with endogenous Cushing's syndrome -- researchers found that these patients face a much higher death rate than those without this condition. Overall, patients with endogenous Cushing's syndrome faced a nearly three times higher mortality ratio (standardized mortality ratio 2.91, 95% CI 2.41-3.68, I2=40.3%), with those with Cushing's disease found to have an even higher mortality risk (SMR 3.27, 95% CI 2.33-4.21, I2=55.6%). And those with adrenal Cushing's syndrome also saw an elevated death risk, although not as high as patients with the disease (SMR 1.62, 95% CI 0.08-3.16, I2=0.0%). The most common causes of mortality among these patients included cardiac conditions (25%), infection (14%), and cerebrovascular disease (9%). "The causes of death highlight the need for aggressive management of cardiovascular risk, prevention of thromboembolism, and good infection control, and emphasize the need to achieve disease remission, normalizing cortisol levels," said lead study author Padiporn Limumpornpetch, MD, of the University of Leeds in England, in a statement. From https://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcoverage/endo/91808
  12. Are adrenal incidentalomas, which are found by chance on imaging, really harmless? In this paper, the authors looked at 32 studies, including 4121 patients with benign non-functioning adrenal tumours (NFATs) or adenomas that cause mild autonomous cortisol excess (MACE). Only 2.5% of the tumours grew to a clinically significant extent over a mean follow-up period of 50 months, and no one developed adrenal cancer. Of those patients with NFAT or MACE, 99.9% didn’t develop clinically significant hormone (cortisol) excess. This was a group (especially those with MACE) with a high prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and obesity. This could be because adrenal adenomas promote cardiometabolic problems, or vice versa, or maybe this group with multimorbidities is more likely be investigated. Adrenal incidentalomas are already found in around 1 in 20 abdominal CT scans, and this rate is likely to increase as imaging improves. So it’s good news that this study supports existing recommendations, which say that follow-up imaging in the 90% of incidentalomas that are smaller than 4 cm diameter is unnecessary. From https://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2019/07/03/ann-robinsons-journal-review-3-july-2019/
  13. A 42-year-old woman who presented to hospital with acute vision loss in her right eye was diagnosed with a benign tumour in her adrenal gland. Writing in BMJ Case Reports, clinicians described how the patient presented with a visual acuity of 6/36 in her right eye and 6/6 in her left eye. Investigations revealed an exudative retinal detachment in her right eye as well as a pigment epithelial detachment. The patient had multifocal central serous retinopathy in both eyes. The woman, who had hypertension and diabetes, was diagnosed with Cushing syndrome and a right adrenal adenoma was also discovered. During a treatment period that spanned several years, the patient received an adrenalectomy followed by a maintenance dose of steroids. The patient subsequently developed central serous retinopathy again which the clinicians believe might be related to steroid use. The authors advised “careful deliberation” in prescribing a maintenance dose of steroids following removal of the adrenal glands because of the potential link to retinopathy. From https://www.aop.org.uk/ot/science-and-vision/research/2018/12/17/vision-loss-the-first-sign-of-adrenal-tumour-in-42-year-old-patient
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