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  1. HRA Pharma Rare Diseases, an affiliate of privately-held French healthcare company HRA Pharma, has revealed data from the six-month extension of PROMPT, the first ever prospective study designed to evaluate metyrapone long-term efficacy and tolerability in endogenous Cushing’s syndrome. After confirming good efficacy and safety of metyrapone in the first phase of the study that ran for 12 weeks, the results of the six-month extension showed that metyrapone successfully maintains low urinary free cortisol (UFC) levels with good tolerability. The data will be presented at the European Congress of Endocrinology 2021 next week. Metyrapone is approved in Europe for the treatment of endogenous Cushing’s syndrome. It works by inhibiting the 11-beta-hydroxylase enzyme, the final step in cortisol synthesis. From https://www.thepharmaletter.com/in-brief/brief-metyrapone-effective-and-safe-in-endogenous-cushing-s-syndrome-in-long-term-says-hra-pharma-rare-diseases
  2. The FDA accepted for review a new drug application for the steroidogenesis inhibitor levoketoconazole for the treatment of endogenous Cushing’s syndrome, according to an industry press release. “We are pleased with the FDA’s acceptance for filing of the Recorlev new drug application,” John H. Johnson, CEO of Strongbridge Biopharma, said in the release. “We believe this decision reflects the comprehensive clinical evidence that went into the NDA submission, including the positive and statistically significant efficacy and safety results from the multinational phase 3 SONICS and LOGICS studies evaluating Recorlev as a potential treatment option for adults with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome. We are advancing our commercial readiness plans and look forward to potentially bringing a new therapeutic option to the Cushing’s syndrome community in the first quarter of 2022.” As Healio previously reported, top-line findings from the LOGICS study demonstrated that levoketoconazole (Recorlev, Strongbridge Biopharma) improved and normalized morning urinary free cortisol concentrations for adults with endogenous Cushing’s disease compared with placebo. The drug was generally well tolerated, with safety data mirroring those from the earlier phase 3 SONICS trial. Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome — caused by chronic hypercortisolism — is rare, with estimates ranging from 40 to 70 people per million affected worldwide, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. The FDA set a Prescription Drug User Fee Act target action date of Jan. 1, 2022, for levoketoconazole, according to the company. The FDA letter made no mention of a plan to hold an advisory committee meeting. From https://www.healio.com/news/endocrinology/20210513/fda-accepts-nda-for-novel-cushings-syndrome-treatment
  3. WASHINGTON--Endogenous Cushing's syndrome, a rare hormonal disorder, is associated with a threefold increase in death, primarily due to cardiovascular disease and infection, according to a study whose results will be presented at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting. The research, according to the study authors, is the largest systematic review and meta-analysis to date of studies of endogenous (meaning "inside your body") Cushing's syndrome. Whereas Cushing's syndrome most often results from external factors--taking cortisol-like medications such as prednisone--the endogenous type occurs when the body overproduces the hormone cortisol, affecting multiple bodily systems. Accurate data on the mortality and specific causes of death in people with endogenous Cushing's syndrome are lacking, said the study's lead author, Padiporn Limumpornpetch, M.D., an endocrinologist from Prince of Songkla University, Thailand and Ph.D. student at the University of Leeds in Leeds, U.K. The study analyzed death data from more than 19,000 patients in 92 studies published through January 2021. "Our results found that death rates have fallen since 2000 but are still unacceptably high," Limumpornpetch said. Cushing's syndrome affects many parts of the body because cortisol responds to stress, maintains blood pressure and cardiovascular function, regulates blood sugar and keeps the immune system in check. The most common cause of endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a tumor of the pituitary gland called Cushing's disease, but another cause is a usually benign tumor of the adrenal glands called adrenal Cushing's syndrome. All patients in this study had noncancerous tumors, according to Limumpornpetch. Overall, the proportion of death from all study cohorts was 5 percent, the researchers reported. The standardized mortality ratio--the ratio of observed deaths in the study group to expected deaths in the general population matched by age and sex--was 3:1, indicating a threefold increase in deaths, she stated. This mortality ratio was reportedly higher in patients with adrenal Cushing's syndrome versus Cushing's disease and in patients who had active disease versus those in remission. The standardized mortality ratio also was worse in patients with Cushing's disease with larger tumors versus very small tumors (macroadenomas versus microadenomas). On the positive side, mortality rates were lower after 2000 versus before then, which Limumpornpetch attributed to advances in diagnosis, operative techniques and medico-surgical care. More than half of observed deaths were due to heart disease (24.7 percent), infections (14.4 percent), cerebrovascular diseases such as stroke or aneurysm (9.4 percent) or blood clots in a vein, known as thromboembolism (4.2 percent). "The causes of death highlight the need for aggressive management of cardiovascular risk, prevention of thromboembolism and good infection control and emphasize the need to achieve disease remission, normalizing cortisol levels," she said. Surgery is the mainstay of initial treatment of Cushing's syndrome. If an operation to remove the tumor fails to put the disease in remission, other treatments are available, such as medications. Study co-author Victoria Nyaga, Ph.D., of the Belgian Cancer Centre in Brussels, Belgium, developed the Metapreg statistical analysis program used in this study. ### Endocrinologists are at the core of solving the most pressing health problems of our time, from diabetes and obesity to infertility, bone health, and hormone-related cancers. The Endocrine Society is the world's oldest and largest organization of scientists devoted to hormone research and physicians who care for people with hormone-related conditions. The Society has more than 18,000 members, including scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in 122 countries. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site at http://www.endocrine.org. Follow us on Twitter at @TheEndoSociety and @EndoMedia. Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system. From https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-03/tes-lao031621.php
  4. Corcept Therapeutics (NASDAQ:CORT) announced that it would be ready to ship Korlym to patients by April 11th, three weeks ahead of the company’s previously announced launch date. “Cushing’s syndrome is a life altering and life threatening disease,” said Joseph K. Belanoff, M.D., the company’s Chief Executive Officer. “We have worked hard to bring this first-in-class treatment to patients as quickly as possible.” On February 17, 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved KorlymTM (mifepristone) 300 mg Tablets as a once-daily oral medicine to control hyperglycemia secondary to hypercortisolism in adult patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome who have type 2 diabetes mellitus or glucose intolerance and have failed surgery or are not candidates for surgery. Physicians and patients seeking more information can visit http://www.korlym.com. Korlym is distributed in 300 milligram tablets to be taken once each day. The wholesale acquisition price of Korlym is $0.62 per milligram. The FDA-approved labeling instructs physicians to titrate each patient’s Korlym dose to clinical efficacy by assessing tolerability and degree of improvement in Cushing’s syndrome manifestations. In the first six weeks, these manifestations may include changes in glucose control, anti-diabetic medication requirements, insulin levels and psychiatric symptoms. After two months, assessment may also be based on improvements in cushingoid appearance, acne, hirsutism, striae or decreased body weight, along with further changes in glucose control. Patient Assistance Programs “Our highest priority is that every patient who is prescribed Korlym will receive it,” said Dr. Belanoff. To that end, the company has launched a comprehensive financial assistance and patient support program. A dedicated team of Corcept case managers will help patients understand their insurance benefits and the financial and medical support programs available to them. “Patients face tremendous challenges managing their illness – from finding physicians familiar with the disease to navigating the complexities of insurance reimbursement to paying for the cost of care,” said Dr. Belanoff. “We are determined that none of these barriers will keep patients from receiving the benefits of Korlym.” About Cushing’s Syndrome Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome is a rare and life-threatening endocrine disorder that results from long-term exposure to excess levels of the hormone cortisol. This excess is caused by tumors that usually occur in the pituitary or adrenal glands that over-produce, or prompt the over-production of, cortisol. Although cortisol at normal levels is essential to health, in excess it causes a variety of problems, including hyperglycemia, upper body obesity, a rounded face, stretch marks on the skin, an accumulation of fat on the back, thin and easily bruised skin, muscle weakness, bone weakness, persistent infections, high blood pressure, fatigue, irritability, anxiety, psychosis and depression. Women may have menstrual irregularities and facial hair growth, while men may have decreased fertility or erectile dysfunction. More than 70 percent of Cushing’s syndrome patients suffer from glucose intolerance or diabetes. The treatment of an endogenous Cushing’s syndrome patient depends on the cause. The first-line approach is surgery to remove the tumor. If surgery is not successful or is not an option, radiation may be used, but that therapy can take up to ten years to achieve full effect. Surgery and radiation are successful in only approximately one-half of all cases. If left untreated, Cushing’s syndrome has a five-year mortality rate of 50 percent. An orphan disease, Cushing’s syndrome occurs in about 20,000 people in the United States, mostly women between the ages of 20 and 50. About Korlym™ (mifepristone) 300 mg Tablets Korlym is a once-daily oral medication that blocks the glucocorticoid receptor type II (GR-II) to which cortisol normally binds. By blocking this receptor, Korlym inhibits the effects of excess cortisol in Cushing’s syndrome patients. The FDA has designated Korlym as an Orphan Drug, a special status designed to encourage the development of medicines for rare diseases and conditions. Because Korlym is an Orphan Drug, Corcept will have marketing exclusivity for the FDA-approved indication until February 2019. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION WARNING: TERMINATION OF PREGNANCY See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning. Mifepristone has potent antiprogestational effects and will result in the termination of pregnancy. Pregnancy must therefore be excluded before the initiation of treatment with Korlym, or if treatment is interrupted for more than 14 days in females of reproductive potential. Contraindications Pregnancy Use of simvastatin or lovastatin and CYP 3A substrates with narrow therapeutic range Concurrent long-term corticosteroid use Women with history of unexplained vaginal bleeding Women with endometrial hyperplasia with atypia or endometrial carcinoma Warnings and Precautions Adrenal insufficiency: Patients should be closely monitored for signs and symptoms of adrenal insufficiency. Hypokalemia: Hypokalemia should be corrected prior to treatment and monitored for during treatment. Vaginal bleeding and endometrial changes: Women may experience endometrial thickening or unexpected vaginal bleeding. Use with caution if patient also has a hemorrhagic disorder or is on anti-coagulant therapy. QT interval prolongation: Avoid use with QT interval-prolonging drugs, or in patients with potassium channel variants resulting in a long QT interval. Use of Strong CYP3A Inhibitors: Concomitant use can increase plasma levels significantly. Use only when necessary and limit dose to 300 mg. Adverse Reactions Most common adverse reactions in Cushing’s syndrome (≥ 20%): nausea, fatigue, headache, decreased blood potassium, arthralgia, vomiting, peripheral edema, hypertension, dizziness, decreased appetite, endometrial hypertrophy. To report suspected adverse reactions, contact Corcept Therapeutics at 1-855-844-3270 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. Drug Interactions Drugs metabolized by CYP3A: Administer drugs that are metabolized by CYP3A at the lowest dose when used with Korlym CYP3A inhibitors: Caution should be used when Korlym is used with strong CYP3A inhibitors. Limit mifepristone dose to 300 mg per day when used with strong CYP3A inhibitors. CYP3A inducers: Do not use Korlym with CYP3A inducers. Drugs metabolized by CYP2C8/2C9: Use the lowest dose of CYP2C8/2C9 substrates when used with Korlym. Drugs metabolized by CYP2B6: Use of Korlym should be done with caution with bupropion and efavirenz. Hormonal contraceptives: Do not use with Korlym. Use in Specific Populations Nursing mothers: Discontinue drug or discontinue nursing. Please see the accompanying full Prescribing Information including boxed warning atwww.corcept.com/prescribinginfo.pdf Please see the accompanying Medication Guide at www.corcept.com/medicationguide.pdf About Corcept Therapeutics Incorporated Corcept is a pharmaceutical company engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of drugs for the treatment of severe metabolic and psychiatric disorders. Korlym, a first generation GR-II antagonist, is the company’s first FDA-approved medication. The company has a portfolio of new selective GR-II antagonists that block the effects of cortisol but not progesterone. Corcept also owns an extensive intellectual property portfolio covering the use of GR-II antagonists, including mifepristone, in the treatment of a wide variety of psychiatric and metabolic disorders. The company also holds composition of matter patents for its selective GR-II antagonists. Statements made in this news release, other than statements of historical fact, are forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are subject to a number of known and unknown risks and uncertainties that might cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such statements. For example, there can be no assurances that clinical results will be predictive of real-world use, or regarding the pace of Korlym’s acceptance by physicians and patients, the reimbursement decisions of government or private insurance payers, the effects of rapid technological change and competition, the protections afforded by Korlym’s Orphan Drug Designation or by Corcept’s other intellectual property rights, and the cost, pace and success of Corcept’s other product development efforts. These and other risks are set forth in the Company's SEC filings, all of which are available from our website (www.corcept.com) or from the SEC's website (www.sec.gov). We disclaim any intention or duty to update any forward-looking statement made in this news release. CONTACT: Investor Contact Charles Robb Chief Financial Officer Corcept Therapeutics 650-688-8783
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