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Found 8 results

  1. Recordati Rare Diseases, a US biopharma that forms part of the wider Italian group, has presented multiple positive data sets on Isturisa (osilodrostat) at the annual ENDO 2022 meeting in Atlanta, Georgia. Isturisa is a cortisol synthesis inhibitor indicated for the treatment of adult patients with Cushing’s disease for whom pituitary surgery is not an option or has not been curative. Among the data presented, the Phase III LINC 4 study demonstrated that Isturisa maintained normal mean urinary free cortisol long-term in patients with Cushing’s disease while the Phase III LINC 3 study found adrenal hormone levels changed during early treatment with the drug while stabilizing during long-term treatment. The ILLUSTRATE study also showed patients treated with a prolonged titration interval tended to have greater persistence with therapy. Mohamed Ladha, president and general manager for North America, Recordati Rare Diseases, said: “The data from these studies reinforces the efficacy and safety of Isturisa as a treatment for patients with Cushing’s disease. “We are pleased to share these data with the endocrine community and are excited to provide patients with a much-needed step forward in the management of this rare, debilitating, and potentially life-threatening condition.” Cushing’s disease is a rare, serious illness caused by a pituitary tumor that leads to overproduction of cortisol by the adrenal glands. Excess cortisol can contribute to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Treatment for the condition seeks to lower cortisol levels to a normal range. Isturisa, which was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in March 2020, works by inhibiting 11-beta-hydroxylase, an enzyme responsible for the final step of cortisol biosynthesis in the adrenal gland. From https://www.thepharmaletter.com/article/results-reinforce-efficacy-of-recordati-s-isturisa-in-cushing-s-disease
  2. — More than half of patients saw physical manifestations fully resolve by week 72 by Kristen Monaco, Staff Writer, MedPage Today May 16, 2022 SAN DIEGO -- Osilodrostat (Isturisa) improved many physical features associated with Cushing's disease, according to additional findings from the phase III LINC-3 study. Among 137 adults with Cushing's disease, a 39.5% improvement in central obesity scores was observed from baseline to week 72 with osilodrostat, reported Alberto Pedroncelli, MD, PhD, of Recordati AG in Basel, Switzerland. Not only was central obesity the most common physical manifestation associated with hypercortisolism among these Cushing's disease patients, but it was also more frequently rated as severe at baseline, Pedroncelli explained during the American Association of Clinical Endocrinology (AACE) annual meeting. Osilodrostat treatment also led to a 34.9% improvement in proximal muscle atrophy at week 72, along with a 34.4% improvement in hirsutism scores. By week 72, nearly all physical manifestations of hypercortisolism saw significant improvement -- marked by more than 50% of patients scoring these physical traits as nonexistent: Dorsal fat pat: 50.6% Central obesity: 30.6% Supraclavicular fat pad: 51.8% Facial rubor: 64.7% Hirsutism in women: 53.1% Proximal muscle atrophy: 61.2% Striae: 63.5% Ecchymoses: 87.1% Most of these physical manifestation improvements were notable soon after treatment initiation with osilodrostat, Pedroncelli pointed out. When stratified according to testosterone levels, hirsutism scores remained either stable or improved in the majority of patients who had normal or above normal testosterone levels. More women with normal testosterone levels over time experienced improvements in hirsutism versus those with levels above the upper limit of normal, who mostly remained stable. Osilodrostat is an oral agent that was first FDA approved in March 2020 for adults with Cushing's disease who either cannot undergo pituitary gland surgery or have undergone the surgery but still have the disease. Available in 1 mg, 5 mg, and 10 mg film-coated tablets, the drug acts as a potent oral 11-beta-hydroxylase inhibitor -- the enzyme involved in the last step of cortisol synthesis. Osilodrostat is taken orally twice daily, once in the morning and once in the evening. Approval was based upon findings from the LINC-3 and LINC-4 trials, which found osilodrostat was able to normalize cortisol levels in 53% of patients, based on mean 24-hour urinary free cortisol (UFC) concentrations. During an initial 10-week randomization phase, 86% of patients maintained their complete cortisol response if they remained on osilodrostat versus only 29% of those who were switched to placebo. As expected, 77.4% of the 137 adults included in the trial were women. The median participant age was 40 and about 47 months had passed since their initial diagnosis. A total of 87.6% underwent previous pituitary surgery and 16.1% underwent previous pituitary irradiation. At baseline, median and mean 24-hour UFC levels were 3.5 nmol and 7.3 nmol, respectively, based on two or three urine samples. Participants had an average body weight of 176.4 lb, body mass index (BMI) of 30, and 41 in waist circumference at baseline. Throughout the trial, all measures dropped, reaching the nadir at week 72: body weight of 165 lb, BMI of 27, and 37.8 in waist circumference. The most common side effects reported with the agent include adrenal insufficiency, fatigue, nausea, headache, and edema. Kristen Monaco is a staff writer, focusing on endocrinology, psychiatry, and nephrology news. Based out of the New York City office, she’s worked at the company since 2015. Disclosures The study was supported by Recordati AG. Pedroncelli reported employment with Recordati. Primary Source American Association of Clinical Endocrinology Source Reference: Pedroncelli AM, et al "Osilodrostat therapy improves physical features associated with hypercortisolism in patients with Cushing's disease: findings from the phase III LINC 3 study" AACE 2022. From https://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcoverage/aace/98745
  3. The LINC 4 study demonstrated superiority of Isturisa® (osilodrostat) over placebo in achieving cortisol normalisation during the 12-week, double-blind, randomised phase (77% vs 8%, P<0.0001). Isturisa provided rapid and sustained control of cortisol secretion in the majority of patients throughout the 48-week core phase of the study. PUTEAUX, France, March 29, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Recordati Rare Diseases announce today the publication of positive results from the Phase III LINC 4 study of Isturisa in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.1 These data reinforce Isturisa as an effective and well-tolerated oral therapy for patients with Cushing’s disease. Isturisa is indicated in the EU for the treatment of adult patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome,2 a rare and debilitating condition of hypercortisolism that is most commonly caused by a pituitary adenoma (Cushing’s disease).3 The LINC 4 study augments the efficacy and safety data for Isturisa in patients with Cushing’s disease, confirming the results from the Phase III LINC 3 study. This study in 73 adults is the first Phase III study of a medical treatment in patients with Cushing’s disease to include an upfront, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled period during which 48 patients received Isturisa and 25 received placebo for the first 12 weeks, followed by an open-label period during which all patients received Isturisa until week 48; thereafter, patients could enter an optional extension phase. Key findings published in the manuscript entitled ‘Randomised trial of osilodrostat for the treatment of Cushing’s disease’ include:1 LINC 4 met the primary endpoint: Isturisa was significantly superior to placebo at normalising mUFC at the end of a 12-week randomised, double-blind period (77% vs 8%; P<0.0001). Effects of Isturisa were rapid. Over one-quarter of patients randomised to Isturisa achieved normal mUFC as early week 2 and 58% achieved control by week 5. The key secondary endpoint was also met, with 81% of all patients in the study having normal mUFC at week 36. Improvements in cardiovascular and metabolic parameters of Cushing’s disease, including blood pressure and blood glucose metabolism, were seen by week 12 and were maintained throughout the study. Physical features of hypercortisolism improved during Isturisa treatment, including fat pads, facial rubor, striae, and muscle wasting. Improvements were observed by week 12, with continued improvement throughout the study to week 48. Patient-reported QoL scores (CushingQoL and Beck Depression Inventory) also improved during Isturisa treatment. Isturisa was well tolerated in the majority of patients, with no unexpected adverse events (AEs). The most common AEs overall were decreased appetite, arthralgia, fatigue and nausea. "These results show convincingly that osilodrostat is an effective treatment for Cushing’s disease," said Peter J. Snyder MD, Professor of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. "Osilodrostat rapidly lowered cortisol excretion to normal in most patients with Cushing’s disease and maintained normal levels throughout the core phase of the study. Importantly, this normalisation was accompanied by improvements in cardiovascular and metabolic parameters, which increase morbidity and mortality in Cushing’s disease." "These compelling data build on the positive Phase III LINC 3 study, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology in 2020,4 demonstrating that Isturisa enables most patients with Cushing’s disease to gain rapid control of their cortisol levels, which in turn provides relief from a host of undesirable symptoms," said Alberto Pedroncelli, Clinical Development & Medical Affairs Lead, Global Endocrinology, Recordati AG. "Recordati Rare Diseases is committed to improving the lives of patients with this rare, debilitating and life-threatening condition. I would like to thank everyone who has contributed to LINC 4 and the LINC clinical programme." "I had Cushing's disease for 8 years without being diagnosed," said Thérèse Fournier from L'association "Surrénales". "I was trapped in a vicious circle of missed diagnoses and worsening physical and psychological symptoms that became life-threatening. I lost everything – my job, my house, my partner, my friends – I was isolated. When I finally received my diagnosis, I was relieved because I knew the truth. Since my surgery, I have been learning to live again, enjoying the moments that make a life. I am still on the path to remission, but I feel deeply happy, even if I carry this journey that nobody can understand." About Cushing’s syndrome Cushing’s syndrome is a rare disorder caused by chronic exposure to excess levels of cortisol from either an exogenous (eg medication) or an endogenous source.5 Cushing’s disease is the most common cause of endogenous Cushing’s syndrome and arises as a result of excess secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone from a pituitary adenoma, a tumour of the pituitary gland.5,6 There is often a delay in diagnosing Cushing’s syndrome, which consequently leads to a delay in treating patients.7 Patients who are exposed to excess levels of cortisol for a prolonged period have increased comorbidities associated with the cardiovascular and metabolic systems, which consequently reduce QoL and increase the risk of mortality.3,6 To alleviate the clinical signs associated with excess cortisol exposure, the primary treatment goal in Cushing’s syndrome is to reduce cortisol levels to normal.8 About LINC 4 LINC 4 is a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, 48-week study with an initial 12-week placebo-controlled period to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Isturisa® in patients with Cushing’s disease. The LINC 4 study enrolled patients with persistent or recurrent Cushing’s disease or those with de novo disease who were ineligible for surgery; 73 randomised patients were treated with Isturisa® (n=48) or placebo (n=25).1 The primary endpoint of the study is the proportion of randomised patients with a complete response (mUFC ≤ULN) at the end of the placebo-controlled period (week 12). The key secondary endpoint is the proportion of patients with an mUFC ≤ULN at week 36.1,9 About Isturisa® Isturisa® is an oral inhibitor of 11β-hydroxylase (CYP11B1), which catalyses the final step of cortisol synthesis in the adrenal glands.2 Isturisa® is available as 1 mg, 5 mg and 10 mg film-coated tablets.2 Isturisa® is approved for the treatment of adult patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome in the EU and is now available in France, Germany, Greece and Austria.2 Isturisa® was granted marketing authorisation by the European Commission on 9 January 2020. For detailed recommendations on the appropriate use of this product, please consult the summary of product characteristics.2 References 1. Gadelha M, Bex M, Feelders RA et al. Randomised trial of osilodrostat for the treatment of Cushing's disease. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2022; dgac178, https://doi.org/10.1210/clinem/dgac178. 2. Isturisa® summary of product characteristics. May 2020. 3. Ferriere A, Tabarin A. Cushing's syndrome: Treatment and new therapeutic approaches. Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab 2020;34:101381. 4. Pivonello R, Fleseriu M, Newell-Price J et al. Efficacy and safety of osilodrostat in patients with Cushing's disease (LINC 3): a multicentre phase III study with a double-blind, randomised withdrawal phase. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 2020;8:748-61. 5. Lacroix A, Feelders RA, Stratakis CA et al. Cushing's syndrome. Lancet 2015;386:913-27. 6. Pivonello R, Isidori AM, De Martino MC et al. Complications of Cushing's syndrome: state of the art. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 2016;4:611-29. 7. Rubinstein G, Osswald A, Hoster E et al. Time to diagnosis in Cushing's syndrome: A meta-analysis based on 5367 patients. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2020;105:dgz136. 8. Nieman LK, Biller BM, Findling JW et al. Treatment of Cushing's syndrome: An Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2015;100:2807-31. 9. ClinicalTrials.gov. NCT02697734; available at https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02697734 (accessed March 2021). Recordati Rare Diseases, the company’s EMEA headquarters are located in Puteaux, France, with global headquarter offices in Milan, Italy. For a full list of products, please click here: www.recordatirarediseases.com/products. Recordati, established in 1926, is an international pharmaceutical group, listed on the Italian Stock Exchange (Reuters RECI.MI, Bloomberg REC IM, ISIN IT 0003828271), with a total staff of more than 4,300, dedicated to the research, development, manufacturing and marketing of pharmaceuticals. Headquartered in Milan, Italy, Recordati has operations in Europe, Russia and the other C.I.S. countries, Ukraine, Turkey, North Africa, the United States of America, Canada, Mexico, some South American countries, Japan and Australia. An efficient field force of medical representatives promotes a wide range of innovative pharmaceuticals, both proprietary and under license, in several therapeutic areas including a specialized business dedicated to treatments for rare diseases. Recordati is a partner of choice for new product licenses for its territories. Recordati is committed to the research and development of new specialties with a focus on treatments for rare diseases. Consolidated revenue for 2021 was € 1,580.1 million, operating income was € 490.2 million and net income was € 386.0 million. For further information: Recordati website: www.recordatirarediseases.com This document contains forward-looking statements relating to future events and future operating, economic and financial results of the Recordati group. By their nature, forward-looking statements involve risk and uncertainty because they depend on the occurrence of future events and circumstances. Actual results may therefore differ materially from those forecast as a result of a variety of reasons, most of which are beyond the Recordati group’s control. The information on the pharmaceutical specialties and other products of the Recordati group contained in this document is intended solely as information on the Recordati group’s activities and therefore, as such, it is not intended as medical scientific indication or recommendation, nor as advertising. View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220325005169/en/ Contacts Celine Plisson, MD Medical Affairs Director Telephone: +33(0)147739463 Email: PLISSON.C@recordati.com Related Quotes Symbol Last Price Change % Change REC Emles Real Estate Credit ETF 22.89 +0.13 +0.57% TRENDING 1. Oil Climbs After Two-Day Drop as Investors Assess Ukraine Talks 2. Stocks Fall, Oil Rises as Russia Concerns Return: Markets Wrap 3. Truckmaker MAN to shorten hours of up to 11,000 workers on Ukraine crisis 4. UPDATE 1-Sri Lanka suffers long power cuts as currency shortage makes fuel scarce 5. German inflation rises more than expected in March From https://finance.yahoo.com/news/recordati-rare-diseases-announce-publication-070000542.html?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAABds3nKexRHBGxK9BEM1W93vciZ-QM8hw9-QOcCELZxkbW8U7OfcYw-GBd_tvRaS9mnjvRvdhI1sQaBD2jkR6yvqhUZsHw6f7CfO78LaGvdTRWhjaIy7b5IcPvPpOCGzR0Ex1_8t1TFNqxMkSr7OmIxfDflflXrh4cHI8Ze3okeU
  4. Cushing’s disease is a progressive pituitary disorder in which there is an excess of cortisol in the body. While the disease can be treated surgically, this option is not possible for all patients. This is one of the approved medications that assist in controlling cortisol levels in people with Cushing’s disease. sturisa was approved in 2020 to treat adults with Cushing’s disease for whom pituitary surgery is ineffective or not an option. The oral medication works by inhibiting an enzyme called 11-beta-hydroxylase, which is involved in cortisol production. Isturisa, also known as osilodrostat or LCI699, is an approved treatment originally developed by Novartis, but now acquired by Recordati to treat people with Cushing’s disease, a condition in which a pituitary tumor causes the body to produce excessive levels of the stress hormone cortisol. In 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Isturisa to treat adults with Cushing’s disease for whom pituitary surgery was not an option, or ineffective. Earlier that same year, the European Commission (EC) approved Isturisa to treat people with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome. The medication also was approved for the same indication in Japan in 2021. How does Isturisa work? Isturisa is an oral medicine that inhibits an enzyme called 11-beta-hydroxylase, which is involved in cortisol production. Blocking the activity of this enzyme prevents excessive cortisol production, normalizing the levels of the hormone in the body and easing the symptoms of Cushing’s disease. Isturisa in clinical trials A Phase 2 clinical trial (NCT01331239) investigated the safety and efficacy of Isturisa as a Cushing’s disease treatment. The trial that concluded in October 2019 initially was named LINC-1, but, through a study protocol amendment, patients who completed the study could continue into a second phase called LINC-2. The company published findings that covered both patient groups in the journal Pituitary. Data showed that Isturisa reduced cortisol levels in the urine of all patients by week 22. Urine cortisol levels reached and remained within a normal range in 79% of the patients by then. Common adverse effects included nausea, diarrhea, lack of energy, and adrenal insufficiency — a condition in which the adrenal glands are unable to produce enough hormones. A Phase 3 clinical trial (NCT02180217) called LINC-3 also assessed the safety and efficacy of Isturisa in 137 patients with Cushing’s disease (77% female, median age 40 years). Participants were given Isturisa for 26 weeks, with efficacy-based dose adjustments during the first 12 weeks. Then, the 71 participants with a complete response (those whose urine cortisol levels were within normal limits) at week 26 and who did not require a dose increase after week 12, were assigned randomly to either continue treatment with Isturisa or switch to a placebo. After this 34-week period, 86% of Isturisa-treated patients had normal urinary cortisol levels, as compared to 29% of participants given placebo. All participants then were given Isturisa for an additional 12 weeks. At the end of the 48-week study, 66% of participants had normal urine cortisol levels. Results from LINC-3 formed the basis for regulatory approvals of Isturisa. Common adverse side effects in the trial included nausea, headache, fatigue, and adrenal insufficiency. A multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 3 trial (NCT02697734) called LINC-4 further confirmed the safety and efficacy of Isturisa as a Cushing’s disease therapy. During the trial, patients received Isturisa or a placebo through a 12-week period followed by treatment with Isturisa until week 48. Top-line results showed that 77% of patients on Isturisa experienced a complete response after the 12-week randomized period, as compared to 8% of those on placebo. No new safety data were noted. A roll-over, worldwide Phase 2 study (NCT03606408) is recruiting patients who have successfully completed any of the previous clinical trials. Patients can continue to take the dosage they received during the initial trial. The aim of this study is to assess the long-term effects of Isturisa for up to five years.
  5. Data from LINC3 and LINC4 provide insight into the impact of dosing titration schedules on risk of hypocortisolism-related adverse events associated with osilodrostat use in patients with Cushing's disease. Data from a pair of phase 3 studies presented at the American Academy of Clinical Endocrinology’s 30th Annual Meeting (AACE 2021) is providing insight into the effect of dose titration schedules with use of osilodrostat (Isturisa) in patients with Cushing’s disease. Presented by Maria Fleseriu, MD, of Oregon Health and Science University, the analysis of the LINC3 and LINC4 demonstrated the more gradual titration occurring in LINC4 resulted in a lower proportion of hypocortisolism-related adverse events, suggesting up-titration every 3 weeks rather than every 2 weeks could help lower event risk without compromising mean urinary free cortisol (mUFC) control. “For patients with Cushing’s disease, osilodrostat should be initiated at the recommended starting dose with incremental dose increases, based on individual response/tolerability aimed at normalizing cortisol levels,” concluded investigators. With approval from the US Food and Drug Administration in March 2020 for patients not eligible for pituitary surgery or have undergone the surgery but still have the disease, osilodrostat became the first FDA-approved therapy address cortisol overproduction by blocking 11β-hydroxylase. Based on results of LINC3, data from the trial, and the subsequent LINC4 trial, provide the greatest available insight into use of the agent in this patient population. The study presented at AACE 2021 sought to assess whether slow dose up titration might affect rates of hypocortisolism-related adverse events by comparing titration schedules from both phase 3 trials. Median osilodrostat exposure was 75 (IQR, 48-117) weeks and 70 (IQR, 49-87) weeks in LINC3 and LINC4, respectively. The median time to first mUFC equal to or less than ULN was 41 (IQR, 30-42) days in LINC3 and 35 (IQR, 34-52) days in LINC4. Adverse events potentially related to hypocortisolism were more common among patients in LINC3 (51%, n=70) than LINC4 (27%, n=20). Upon analysis of adverse events, investigators found the most commonly reported type of adverse event was adrenal insufficiency, which included events of glucocorticoid deficiency, adrenocortical insufficiency, steroid withdrawal syndrome, and decreased urinary free cortisol. Results incited the majority of hypocortisolism-related adverse events occurred during the dos titration periods of each trial. In LINC3, 54 of the 70 (77%) hypocortisolism-related adverse events occurred by week 26. In comparison, 58% of hypocortisolism-related adverse events occurring in LINC4 occurred prior to week 12. Investigators noted most of events that occurred were mild or moderate and managed with dose interruption or reduction of osilodrostat or concomitant medications. This study, “Effect of Dosing and Titration of Osilodrostat on Efficacy and Safety in Patients with Cushing's Disease (CD): Results from Two Phase III Trials (LINC3 and LINC4),” was presented at AACE 2021. From https://www.endocrinologynetwork.com/view/fda-panels-votes-to-support-teplizumab-potential-for-delaying-type-1-diabetes
  6. Hypercortisolism Quickly Reversed With Oral Tx Oral osilodrostat (Isturisa) normalized cortisol levels in Cushing's disease patients who were ineligible for or not cured with pituitary surgery, according to the phase III LINC 3 trial. After 24 weeks of open-label treatment with twice-daily osilodrostat, 53% of patients (72 of 137; 95% CI 43.9-61.1) were able to maintain a complete response -- marked by mean 24-hour urinary free cortisol concentration of the upper limit of normal or below -- without any uptitration in dosage after the initial 12-week buildup phase, reported Rosario Pivonello, MD, of the Università Federico II di Napoli in Italy, and colleagues. As they explained in their study online in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, following the 24-week open-label period these complete responders to treatment were then randomized 1:1 to either remain on osilodrostat or be switched to placebo. During this 10-week randomization phase, 86% of patients maintained their complete cortisol response if they remained on osilodrostat versus only 29% of those who were switched to placebo (odds ratio 13.7, 95% CI 3.7-53.4, P<0.0001) -- meeting the trial's primary endpoint. As for adverse events, more than half of patients experienced hypocortisolism, and the most common adverse events included nausea (42%), headache (34%), fatigue (28%), and adrenal insufficiency (28%). "Alongside careful dose adjustments and monitoring of known risks associated with osilodrostat, our findings indicate a positive benefit-risk consideration of treatment for most patients with Cushing's disease," the researchers concluded. This oral inhibitor of 11β-­hydroxylase -- the enzyme involved in the last step of cortisol synthesis -- was FDA approved in March 2020 based on these findings, and is currently available in 1 mg, 5 mg, and 10 mg film-coated tablets. The prospective trial, consisting of four periods, included individuals between the ages of 18 and 75 with confirmed persistent or recurrent Cushing's disease -- marked by a mean 24-h urinary free cortisol concentration over 1.5 times the upper limit of normal (50 μg/24 hours), along with morning plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone above the lower limit of normal (9 pg/mL). All individuals had either undergone prior pituitary surgery or irradiation, were not deemed to be candidates for surgery, or had refused to have surgery. During the first open-label study period, all participants took 2 mg of oral osilodrostat twice daily, spaced 12 hours apart. This dose was then titrated up if the average of three 24-h urinary free cortisol concentration samples exceeded the upper limit of normal. During the second study period, which spanned weeks 12 through 24, all participants remained on their osilodrostat therapeutic dose. By week 24, about 62% of the participants were taking a therapeutic dose of 5 mg or less twice daily; only about 6% of patients needed a dose higher than 10 mg twice daily. In the third study period, which spanned weeks 26 through 34, "complete responders" who achieved normal cortisol levels were then randomized to continue treatment or be switched to placebo, while those who did not fully respond to treatment continued on osilodrostat. For the fourth study period, from weeks 24 through 48, all participants were switched back to active treatment with osilodrostat. Overall, 96% of participants were able to achieve a complete response at some point while on osilodrostat treatment, with two-thirds of these responders maintaining this normalized cortisol level for at least 6 months. The median time to first complete response was 41 days. Metabolic profiles also improved along with this reduction in cortisol levels. These included improvements in body weight, body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, both systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and total cholesterol levels. "Given the known clinical burden of cardiovascular risk associated with Cushing's disease, the improvement in clinical features shown here indicates important benefits of osilodrostat," the researchers said. "By improving multiple cardiovascular risk factors, our findings are likely to be clinically relevant." Along with metabolic improvements, patients also had "clinically meaningful improvements" in quality of life, as well as reductions in depressive symptoms measured by the Beck Depression Inventory score, the investigators reported. One limitation to the trial, they noted, was an inability to control for concomitant medications, since nearly all participants were taking other medications, particularly antihypertensive and antidiabetic therapies. "Further examination of the effects of osilodrostat on the clinical signs of Cushing's disease, and the reasons for changes in concomitant medications and the association between such medications and clinical outcomes would be valuable," Pivonello's group said. From https://www.medpagetoday.com/endocrinology/generalendocrinology/87827
  7. Cushing syndrome, a rare endocrine disorder caused by abnormally excessive amounts of the hormone cortisol, has a new pharmaceutical treatment to treat cortisol overproduction. Osilodrostat (Isturisa) is the first FDA approved drug who either can’t undergo pituitary gland surgery or have undergone the surgery but still have the disease. The oral tablet functions by blocking the enzyme responsible for cortisol synthesis, 11-beta-hydroxylase. “Until now, patients in need of medications…have had few approved options, either with limited efficacy or with too many adverse effects. With this demonstrated effective oral treatment, we have a therapeutic option that will help address patients' needs in this underserved patient population," said Maria Fleseriu, MD, FACE, professor of medicine and neurological surgery and director of the Pituitary Center at Oregon Health Sciences University. Cushing disease is caused by a pituitary tumor that releases too much of the hormone that stimulates cortisol production, adrenocorticotropin. This causes excessive levels of cortisol, a hormone responsible for helping to maintain blood sugar levels, regulate metabolism, help reduce inflammation, assist in memory formulation, and support fetus development during pregnancy. The condition is most common among adults aged 30-50 and affects women 3 times more than men. Cushing disease can lead to a number of medical issues including high blood pressure, obesity, type 2 diabetes, blood clots in the arms and legs, bone loss and fractures, a weakened immune system, and depression. Patients with Cushing disease may also have thin arms and legs, a round red full face, increased fat around the neck, easy bruising, striae (purple stretch marks), or weak muscles. Side effects of osilodrostat occurring in more than 20% of patients are adrenal insufficiency, headache, nausea, fatigue, and edema. Other side effects can include vomiting, hypocortisolism (low cortisol levels), QTc prolongation (heart rhythm condition), elevations in adrenal hormone precursors (inactive substance converted into hormone), and androgens (hormone that regulated male characteristics). Osilodrostat’s safety and effectiveness was evaluated in a study consisting of 137 patients, of which about 75% were women. After a 24-week period, about half of patients had achieved normal cortisol levels; 71 successful cases then entered an 8-week, double-blind, randomized withdrawal study where 86% of patients receiving osilodrostat maintained normal cortisol levels, compared with 30% who were taking a placebo. In January 2020, the European Commission also granted marketing authorization for osilodrostat. From https://www.ajmc.com/newsroom/patients-with-cushing-have-new-nonsurgical-treatment-option
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