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Found 15 results

  1. @happygirl - this looks perfect for you with all your videos! If you or anyone else from these boards does this, please let me know Help Rare Patient Voice spread the word to other patients and caregivers about RPV by submitting a short video on your experience with us. Check out the growing group of patients and caregivers who have recorded stories: https://rarepatientvoice.com#sharevoice. As a thank you for recording a video, we will send you a Rarity zebra plushie AND enter you in a raffle to win a $100 Amazon gift card. Follow these steps to record and submit your own video! Step 1: Scan with code below with the camera app from your Apple/Android mobile device or click the link below! https://admin.storyvine.com/app_users/sign_up/Sharing_My_Voice Step 2: Download the Storyvine app from the App Store or Google Play Step 3: Film and upload your video! To thank you for recording a video, we will send you a Rarity zebra plushie AND enter you in a raffle to win a $100 Amazon gift card. Congratulations to Natalie of California, our January 3 raffle winner! Our next raffle will be held in early February.
  2. We are thrilled to invite you to join us and hundreds of others virtually for Rare Disease Week on Capitol Hill from February 22nd to March 2nd, for a week that can change your life. In 2022 advocates will once again have the opportunity to participate in the Points for Advocacy Scavenger Hunt and the EveryLife Foundation will award a total of $100,000 to the top-50 point earners' rare disease non-profit organization of choice! Over the last 11 years, thousands of rare disease patients, family members, friends, and health care providers have joined together to give rare disease patients a voice on Capitol Hill. Meeting virtually during the pandemic has not slowed us down but has reenergized many of us on the importance of our advocacy work. Both of our first times attending Rare Disease Week, Sarah in 2017 and Sarita in 2021, sparked our passion for advocacy! We hope that you will join us for Rare Disease Week which brings the community together to learn, network and advocate. Please reach out to RDLA staff Katelyn Laws at klaws@everylifefoundation.org if you have any questions or need more information.
  3. Meet Rare Disease Advocates from your state and region, get to know our YARR members, and win prizes! Each session is arranged based on where you live and hosted by RDLA in partnership with the Young Adult Representatives of RDLA (YARR) and State Organization Leaders. This is a fun opportunity for the rare disease community in each region and state to get together before Rare Disease Week to foster community and camaraderie. Whether you are new or a veteran of the rare disease community, there will be something for everyone. We want to take time to get together socially before the excitement of Rare Disease Week! See below for details on the virtual session in YOUR region. Please note that you will be prompted to select which Meet and Greet session below you would like to attend once you reach the checkout page. One session per attendee. Please choose the session with the state from where you are located. Please note the time zone! Virtual Regional Meet and Greet Sessions: January 11 at 5-6 pm PST: AK, AZ, CA, CO, HI, ID, MT, NV, NM, OR, UT, WA, WY, U.S. Territories January 11 at 6-7 pm CST: AR, IL, IN, IA, KS, MI, MN, MO, NE, ND, OK, SD, WI January 13 at 6-7 pm CST: AL, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, OH, SC, TN, TX, WV January 13 at 6-7 pm EST: CT, DC, DE, ME, MD, MA, NH, NJ, NY, NC, PA, RI, VT, VA No prior experience necessary. Registration for this event and all RDLA events are free for rare disease advocates. RAFFLE DETAILS: To be entered to win the raffle, registration AND attendance to one Regional Meet and Greet 2022 session is required. Only one winner per session. No repeat winners for attending multiple sessions. This is NOT registration for Rare Disease Week. If you have not registered for Rare Disease Week and would like to please click here. For more information or for any questions, please contact Rachelle Raudes, RDLA State Advocacy Fellow at rraudes@everylifefoundation.org or visit our State Advocacy Hub. Register Here for a Virtual Meet and Greet Session You can find the schedule of events for Virtual Rare Disease Week below. Virtual Rare Disease Week on Capitol Hill 2022 Schedule of Events Tuesday, February 22 1:00-2:00 pm ET: Rare Disease Congressional Caucus Briefing 5:30 -7:30 pm ET: Rare Disease Documentary Screening Wednesday, February 23 1:00-5:00 pm ET: Legislative Conference Day 1 5:00 pm ET: Virtual Rare Artist Gallery Opens Thursday, February 24 1:00-5:00 pm ET: Legislative Conference Day 2 5:15-6:00 pm ET: YARR Meetup Friday, February 25 12:00-1:00 pm ET: Office Hours Monday, February 28 Rare Disease Day at NIH Tuesday, March 1 Meetings with House of Representatives Wednesday, March 2 Meeting with Senators
  4. MaryO

    Light Up for Rare

    The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) asks Americans to plan ahead to participate in the Light Up for Rare campaign to raise awareness of rare diseases. NORD is the U.S. sponsor for Rare Disease Day on Feb. 28. The annual awareness day spotlights approximately 7,000 rare diseases that affect more than 300 million people worldwide. More than 25 million Americans and their families are believed to be affected by rare diseases. Participants are encouraged to light or decorate their homes in blue, green, pink, and purple at 7 p.m. local time on Feb. 28. (Blue should be used if only one color is possible.) NORD suggests using NovaBright to light up a building, monument, home, or neighborhood in these rare disease colors. To join the Light Up for Rare campaign, sign up here. Participants should complete the applications required by the landmarks they pledge to light up, which could include historic buildings and homes, schools and universities, businesses, stadiums, bridges, and monuments. A downloadable template request is available to ask cities and buildings to participate in the initiative. Once requests are approved, participants should inform NORD so the organization can track the buildings that will be illuminated for Rare Disease Day. Light Up for Rare is part of the Global Chain of Lights campaign, which aims to unite the rare disease community across the globe and symbolically break the isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The European Organization for Rare Diseases (EURORDIS), NORD’s counterpart in Europe, is coordinating the Feb. 28 awareness day there along with several patient advocacy groups. On leap years, Rare Disease Day falls on Feb. 29, the rarest day of the year. Download the Light Up for Rare toolkit here. Information on how to illuminate a building can be found here. The general public, as well as caregivers, healthcare professionals, researchers, clinicians, policymakers, and industry representatives are encouraged to participate in Rare Disease Day advocacy and events. Other toolkits and resources for Rare Disease Day are available here. After buildings and landmarks are lit up in Rare Disease Day colors, participants are encouraged to share photos and videos on social media. Please use the #RareDiseaseDay and #ShowYourStripes hashtags so the efforts can be spotlighted. More information at https://rarediseases.org/rare-disease-day/rare-disease-day-light-up-for-rare/
  5. The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) asks Americans to plan ahead to participate in the Light Up for Rare campaign to raise awareness of rare diseases. NORD is the U.S. sponsor for Rare Disease Day on Feb. 28. The annual awareness day spotlights approximately 7,000 rare diseases that affect more than 300 million people worldwide. More than 25 million Americans and their families are believed to be affected by rare diseases. Participants are encouraged to light or decorate their homes in blue, green, pink, and purple at 7 p.m. local time on Feb. 28. (Blue should be used if only one color is possible.) NORD suggests using NovaBright to light up a building, monument, home, or neighborhood in these rare disease colors. To join the Light Up for Rare campaign, sign up here. Participants should complete the applications required by the landmarks they pledge to light up, which could include historic buildings and homes, schools and universities, businesses, stadiums, bridges, and monuments. A downloadable template request is available to ask cities and buildings to participate in the initiative. Once requests are approved, participants should inform NORD so the organization can track the buildings that will be illuminated for Rare Disease Day. Light Up for Rare is part of the Global Chain of Lights campaign, which aims to unite the rare disease community across the globe and symbolically break the isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The European Organization for Rare Diseases (EURORDIS), NORD’s counterpart in Europe, is coordinating the Feb. 28 awareness day there along with several patient advocacy groups. On leap years, Rare Disease Day falls on Feb. 29, the rarest day of the year. Download the Light Up for Rare toolkit here. Information on how to illuminate a building can be found here. The general public, as well as caregivers, healthcare professionals, researchers, clinicians, policymakers, and industry representatives are encouraged to participate in Rare Disease Day advocacy and events. Other toolkits and resources for Rare Disease Day are available here. After buildings and landmarks are lit up in Rare Disease Day colors, participants are encouraged to share photos and videos on social media. Please use the #RareDiseaseDay and #ShowYourStripes hashtags so the efforts can be spotlighted. More information at https://rarediseases.org/rare-disease-day/rare-disease-day-light-up-for-rare/
  6. Please help us spread the word to other patients and caregivers about Rare Patient Voice by submitting a short video about your experience with us. Using the Storyvine app, recording a video on your phone is quick, easy, and fun! Videos will be featured on our website, on social media, and in newsletters. Check out and join the growing group of RPV patients and caregivers who have recorded stories! https://rarepatientvoice.com#sharevoice Follow these steps to record and submit your own video! Step 1: Scan with code below with the camera app from your Apple/Android mobile device or click the link below! https://admin.storyvine.com/app_users/sign_up/Sharing_My_Voice Step 2: Download the Storyvine app from the App Store or Google Play Step 3: Film and upload your video! To thank you for recording a video, we will send you a Rarity zebra plushie AND enter you in a raffle to win a $100 Amazon gift card. Congratulations to Stacy of South Carolina, our December 1 raffle winner! Our next raffle will be held in early January.
  7. We are thrilled to invite you to join us and hundreds of others virtually for Rare Disease Week on Capitol Hill from February 22nd to March 2nd, for a week that can change your life. In 2022 advocates will once again have the opportunity to participate in the Points for Advocacy Scavenger Hunt and the EveryLife Foundation will award a total of $100,000 to the top-50 point earners' rare disease non-profit organization of choice! Over the last 11 years, thousands of rare disease patients, family members, friends, and health care providers have joined together to give rare disease patients a voice on Capitol Hill. Meeting virtually during the pandemic has not slowed us down but has reenergized many of us on the importance of our advocacy work. Both of our first times attending Rare Disease Week, Sarah in 2017 and Sarita in 2021, sparked our passion for advocacy! We hope that you will join us for Rare Disease Week which brings the community together to learn, network and advocate. Please reach out to RDLA staff Katelyn Laws at klaws@everylifefoundation.org if you have any questions or need more information.
  8. From https://rarediseases.org/for-patients-and-families/help-access-medications/patient-assistance-programs-2/ Cushing’s Syndrome | Accepting Applications Medical Assistance Co-Pay Assistance Premium Assistance Contact: 1-855-864-4018 Email: cushings@rarediseases.org Fax: 1-203-517-0978
  9. An updated guideline for the treatment of Cushing’s disease focuses on new therapeutic options and an algorithm for screening and diagnosis, along with best practices for managing disease recurrence. Despite the recent approval of novel therapies, management of Cushing’s disease remains challenging. The disorder is associated with significant comorbidities and has high mortality if left uncontrolled. Source: Adobe Stock “As the disease is inexorable and chronic, patients often experience recurrence after surgery or are not responsive to medications,” Shlomo Melmed, MB, ChB, MACP, dean, executive vice president and professor of medicine at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, and an Endocrine Today Editorial Board Member, told Healio. “These guidelines enable navigation of optimal therapeutic options now available for physicians and patients. Especially helpful are the evidence-based patient flow charts [that] guide the physician along a complex management path, which usually entails years or decades of follow-up.” Shlomo Melmed The Pituitary Society convened a consensus workshop with more than 50 academic researchers and clinical experts across five continents to discuss the application of recent evidence to clinical practice. In advance of the virtual meeting, participants reviewed data from January 2015 to April 2021 on screening and diagnosis; surgery, medical and radiation therapy; and disease-related and treatment-related complications of Cushing’s disease, all summarized in recorded lectures. The guideline includes recommendations regarding use of laboratory tests, imaging and treatment options, along with algorithms for diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome and management of Cushing’s disease. Updates in laboratory, testing guidance If Cushing’s syndrome is suspected, any of the available diagnostic tests could be useful, according to the guideline. The authors recommend starting with urinary free cortisol, late-night salivary cortisol, overnight 1 mg dexamethasone suppression, or a combination, depending on local availability. If an adrenal tumor is suspected, the guideline recommends overnight dexamethasone suppression and using late-night salivary cortisol only if cortisone concentrations can also be reported. The guideline includes several new recommendations in the diagnosis arena, particularly on the role of salivary cortisol assays, according to Maria Fleseriu, MD, FACE, a Healio | Endocrine Today Co-editor, professor of medicine and neurological surgery and director of the Pituitary Center at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. Maria Fleseriu “Salivary cortisol assays are not available in all countries, thus other screening tests can also be used,” Fleseriu told Healio. “We also highlighted the sequence of testing for recurrence, as many patients’ urinary free cortisol becomes abnormal later in the course, sometimes up to 1 year later.” The guideline states combined biochemical and imaging for select patients could potentially replace petrosal sinus sampling, a very specialized procedure that cannot be performed in all hospitals, but more data are needed. “With the corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test becoming unavailable in the U.S. and other countries, the focus is now on desmopressin to replace corticotropin-releasing hormone in some of the dynamic testing, both for diagnosis of pseudo-Cushing’s as well as localization of adrenocorticotropic hormone excess,” Fleseriu said. The guideline also has a new recommendation for anticoagulation for high-risk patients; however, the exact duration and which patients are at higher risk remains unknown. “We always have to balance risk for clotting with risk for bleeding postop,” Fleseriu said. “Similarly, recommended workups for bone disease and growth hormone deficiency have been further structured based on pitfalls specifically related to hypercortisolemia influencing these complications, as well as improvement after Cushing’s remission in some patients, but not all.” New treatment options The guideline authors recommended individualizing medical therapy for all patients with Cushing’s disease based on the clinical scenario, including severity of hypercortisolism. “Regulatory approvals, treatment availability and drug costs vary between countries and often influence treatment selection,” the authors wrote. “However, where possible, it is important to consider balancing cost of treatment with the cost and the adverse consequences of ineffective or insufficient treatment. In patients with severe disease, the primary goal is to treat aggressively to normalize cortisol concentrations.” Fleseriu said the authors reviewed outcomes data as well as pros and cons of surgery, repeat surgery, medical treatments, radiation and bilateral adrenalectomy, highlighting the importance of individualized treatment in Cushing’s disease. “As shown over the last few years, recurrence rates are much higher than previously thought and patients need to be followed lifelong,” Fleseriu said. “The role of adjuvant therapy after either failed pituitary surgery or recurrence is becoming more important, but preoperative or even primary medical treatment has been also used more, too, especially in the COVID-19 era.” The guideline summarized data on all medical treatments available, either approved by regulatory agencies or used off-label, as well as drugs studied in phase 3 clinical trials. “Based on great discussions at the meeting and subsequent emails to reach consensus, we highlighted and graded recommendations on several practical points,” Fleseriu said. “These include which factors are helpful in selection of a medical therapy, which factors are used in selecting an adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitor, how is tumor growth monitored when using an adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitor or glucocorticoid receptor blocker, and how treatment response is monitored for each therapy. We also outline which factors are considered in deciding whether to use combination therapy or to switch to another therapy and which agents are used for optimal combination therapy.” Future research needed The guideline authors noted more research is needed regarding screening and diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome; researchers must optimize pituitary MRI and PET imaging using improved data acquisition and processing to improve microadenoma detection. New diagnostic algorithms are also needed for the differential diagnosis using invasive vs. noninvasive strategies. Additionally, the researchers said the use of anticoagulant prophylaxis and therapy in different populations and settings must be further studied, as well as determining the clinical benefit of restoring the circadian rhythm, potentially with a higher nighttime medication dose, as well as identifying better markers of disease activity and control. “Hopefully, our patients will now experience a higher quality of life and fewer comorbidities if their endocrinologist and care teams are equipped with this informative roadmap for integrated management, employing a consolidation of surgery, radiation and medical treatments,” Melmed told Healio. From https://www.healio.com/news/endocrinology/20211029/updated-cushings-disease-guideline-highlights-new-diagnosis-treatment-roadmap
  10. until
    Each year, Global Genes convenes one of the world’s largest gatherings of rare disease patients, caregivers, advocates, healthcare professionals, researchers, partners and allies. Join us for a variety of interactive and educational events, meet-ups, workshops and networking opportunities. Here you’ll have the opportunity to connect and engage with others in the rare disease community, while experiencing the sense of community and belonging we’ve missed so much. Gain insights about the latest in rare disease innovations, best practices for advocating on an individual and organizational level, and actionable strategies you can implement immediately to accelerate change. The 2021 RARE Patient Advocacy Summit is a virtual event, happening Monday, September 27, 2021 through Wednesday, September 29, 2021. 2021 RARE Patient Advocacy Summit virtual registration is now open! Register here: https://web.cvent.com/event/289bd182-abf4-49b0-90be-c2320566c276/regProcessStep1 Speakers: https://globalgenes.org/summit-featured-speakers/ Interested in becoming a speaker? Fill out the speaker inquiry form here.
  11. until
    More information at
  12. This is a 30 min Online Survey and Compensation is $50.00 Sign up at the link below to receive an email invite to the study and see if you qualify https://rarepatientvoice.com/CushingsHelp/
  13. For those who can not make it to Washington, DC next week, we're pleased to announce a livestream will be available for the Rare Disease Congressional Caucus briefing. Rare Disease Legislative Advocates with honorary co-hosts Representatives Leonard Lance (R-NJ) and G. K. Butterfield (D-NC) and Senators Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), Co-Chairs of the Rare Disease Congressional Caucus, invite you to a lunch briefing: The Diagnostic Odyssey Tuesday, December 4, 2018, from 12:00 p.m. until 1:00 p.m. 121 Cannon House Office Building Complimentary lunch included Registration available on-site Register for the event livestream by clicking this link. If you have questions about the briefing, please email Shannon von Felden, RDLA Program Manager, at svonfelden@everylifefoundation.org.
  14. MaryO

    Patient Day 2018

    Please join us for Patient Day 2018 at Ultragenyx in Novato, CA on Saturday, April 7, 2018, for a day of live music, food, games, refreshments, and much more! A limited number of travel scholarships will be available for patients and loved ones that may be joining them to support their participation in Patient Day 2018. For event details, travel scholarship information and to register, please click here. An email confirmation will be sent to you upon completion of your registration. Travel scholarship awards will be sent out after February 1, 2018, once a decision is made. We welcome all families living with any rare disease to join us in celebrating their strength and courage, while also recognizing their daily challenges and sacrifices. The interactions between our employees and families provide a first-hand education about living with rare disease and further inspires the work we do for patients and families. We would like to honor and thank all of the patients who are participating in our clinical trials; however, we also have to follow federal regulations regarding the avoidance of influencing patients in our studies. So sadly, we cannot have patients who are currently participating in selected Ultragenyx or Audentes studies attend Patient Day 2018. If you are a healthcare provider caring for people with rare diseases, please feel free to forward this invitation to your relevant patients. Please contact us if you have any questions or are unable to access the registration site. Hope to see you there! Patient Day Registration Team (415) 695-8001 PatientDay@keyevents.com
  15. Sign Up and Enjoy Patient Benefits To join our database and to receive a $5 gift card if you qualify, please complete the form below. Currently, we are looking for patients and caregivers with many different rare conditions. Please fill out the sign-up form below and we’ll let you know if you qualify. If you are the caregiver of more than one patient, or are both a patient and caregiver, please fill out a separate entry for each and you will receive multiple gift cards. Please be aware that each entry is checked individually. Please include your correct personal phone number as we will call you to verify your information. It may take up to four weeks before you receive your gift card if you qualify. Read more about how we use your information. At this time we are accepting patients and caregivers across all diseases and conditions. However, that does not guarantee we will have surveys for you. If there are not any companies that have treatments available, or there are no companies developing treatments, then there would be no sponsors for surveys. But we are always looking for sponsors for all disease categories! Only one caregiver per household, please! That is because our survey sponsors won’t allow more than one response from caregivers in the same household. If you have more than one caregiver, you can decide which of you can do each survey. Please be aware that the rewards you earn from participating in market research, like all income you receive, is considered taxable by the IRS. We are required to submit form 1099 for each patient or caregiver whom we pay $600 or more in a year. We are proud to say that we’ve rewarded patients with over $2.1 million for participating in surveys in the past four years! Register here!
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