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Three years prospective investigation of anterior pituitary function after traumatic brain injury: a pilot study


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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bsc/...dumab.henrietta

 

Three years prospective investigation of anterior pituitary function after traumatic brain injury: a pilot study

 

Authors: Tanriverdi, Fatih1; Ulutabanca, Halil2; Unluhizarci, Kursad1; Selcuklu, Ahmet2; Casanueva, Felipe F.3; Kelestimur, Fahrettin2

 

Source: Clinical Endocrinology, Volume 68, Number 4, April 2008 , pp. 573-579(7)

 

Publisher: Blackwell Publishing

 

Abstract:

Summary Objective

 

It has been recently demonstrated that traumatic brain injury (TBI)-mediated hypopituitarism could be more frequent than previously known. However, most of the previous data were obtained from retrospective studies, and the natural history of the hypopituitarism due to TBI is still unclear. So far no study has been reported in which the pituitary function of the same patients has been investigated more than 1 year after TBI. Therefore, we report the results of 3 years prospective follow-up of anterior pituitary function in patients with mild, moderate and severe TBI. Patients and design

 

Thirty patients (25 males, 5 females; age 37?2 ? 2?4 years) with TBI were included in the study. Pituitary function was evaluated at 1 and 3 years after TBI. Results

 

After individual evaluation of GH deficiency from 1 year to 3 years after TBI, 7 of 13 (53?8%) GH-deficient patients at 1st year recovered after 3 years of TBI, and GH deficiency detected at 3 years in one patient was new onset. Additionally, five of six (83?3%) ACTH-deficient patients at 1st year recovered after 3 years of TBI, and ACTH deficiency detected at 3 years in one patient was new onset. Conclusions

 

GH deficiency is the most common pituitary deficit 1 and 3 years after TBI. In patients with mild and moderate TBI, pituitary function improves over time in a considerable number of patients, but it may also worsen rarely over the 3-year period. In patients with severe TBI, ACTH and GH deficiencies at 1st year evaluation persist at 3rd year.

 

Document Type: Research article

 

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2265.2007.03070.x

 

Affiliations: 1: Departments of Endocrinology and 2: Neurosurgery, Erciyes University Medical School, Kayseri, Turkey and 3: Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela University, Santiago de Compostela, Spain

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MaryO Thanks for this little gem.

 

Robin 10/10 for observation...fits in nicely with the mouse episode although no endo seems interested even after it was pointed up by a psych during an interview.( For those who don't know the story, I fell one night trying to catch a mouse in the bedroom and smashed my top lip, underside of nose on the window sill, broke my front teeth and passed out 5 times in half an hour before my wife was able to get me in a car and get me to ER where they x-rayed me and sent me home OK .....oh yeah.....3 years ago!)

 

Dave

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