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Pituitary Tumors & Suicide research


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:hug: Yikes!

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1765716...Pubmed_RVDocSum

 

BACKGROUND: Current data suggest an influence of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on suicidal behavior. The frequency of pituitary adenomas in suicide victims has not yet been investigated. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess whether the incidence of pituitary adenomas is correlated with suicide. METHODS: Serial sections of 151 human pituitary glands obtained upon autopsy were examined microscopically. The glands were collected from 70 suicide victims and 81 subjects whose deaths were classified as unexpected or accidental (nonsuicidal group). The sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and the presence of adenoma was confirmed by immunostaining for collagen III. RESULTS: In the suicidal group, pituitary microadenomas were found in 32 cases (47.7%), while in the nonsuicidal group microadenomas were detected in 15 cases (18.3%). The observed difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0003). The relative risk ratio of suicide in persons with pituitary adenomas was estimated at 1.9. Logistic regression analysis in a model controlled for age and sex showed that microadenomas constituted a unique risk factor in this model. The immunohistochemical phenotyping revealed a higher percentage of immunopositive (secreting) microadenomas in the nonsuicidal group as compared to the suicidal group (80.0 vs. 59.38%) and a predominance of growth hormone-secreting microadenomas in both groups. However, these differences as well as differences in the hormonal profiles of microadenomas between the groups were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that pituitary adenomas belong to suicide risk factors. © 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

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Am I reading that wrong because the way it reads the summary makes no sense... The immunohistochemical phenotyping revealed a higher percentage of immunopositive (secreting) microadenomas in the nonsuicidal group as compared to the suicidal group...

 

That seems to say the opposite of their conclusion. Or is my brain fried today?

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That is confusing. Hmm. I don't know...

 

But, I have to call Lisa out on this. Dear, what were you googling when you found this? Ahem. Is there something you are not sharing?? You know you can vent anything here...Hope you are okay!

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Even non secreting tumors do damage, though, due to the effect of their mass on the gland.

 

Just sayinzall. I wonder if it's because a non secreting tumor is more likely to cause deficiencies, and a functional one highs?

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1765716...Pubmed_RVDocSum

The immunohistochemical phenotyping revealed a higher percentage of immunopositive (secreting) microadenomas in the nonsuicidal group as compared to the suicidal group (80.0 vs. 59.38%) and a predominance of growth hormone-secreting microadenomas in both groups. However, these differences as well as differences in the hormonal profiles of microadenomas between the groups were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that pituitary adenomas belong to suicide risk factors. ? 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

 

 

I wonder if this is because of people like us? If you have a tumor that is secreting all the time, it's easy to diagnose, and get it treated. Those of us who have it cyclical, it's on and off, and makes it harder to diagnose, therefore, they think it is not secreting, just because it wasn't at the time they tested. That = a very fed up, frustrated, depressed patient = higher suicide rate.

 

My guess is the patients who get diagnosed quickly do not get depressed, or at least AS depressed, and don't have to deal with it as long. We get depressed because we know there is something wrong, and we have a hard time proving it. Dr's. think it is not a secreting tumor (it's not doing anything) and we have to keep testing, if we are lucky enough to have a Dr. who even believes us! Most of them just blow you of. That makes for more depression when you can't even get a Dr. to believe there is something wrong with you, when there clearly is!

 

Gracie

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That is confusing. Hmm. I don't know...

 

But, I have to call Lisa out on this. Dear, what were you googling when you found this? Ahem. Is there something you are not sharing?? You know you can vent anything here...Hope you are okay!

 

Oh, no no no - I'm fine. I was searching Pubmed for something - then sorted it by publication date and came up with tons of stuff I have never seen before. I'm not researching suicide. ;)

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Remember, cortisol lows make people depressed. Cyclical patients get to experience all the fun stuff that goes along with that.

 

I felt suicidal, and know others who did, too. Lucky for us we were too sick, confused, and apathetic to do anything about it.

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Whew. Just makin' sure.

 

Best,

Katie

 

Oh, no no no - I'm fine. I was searching Pubmed for something - then sorted it by publication date and came up with tons of stuff I have never seen before. I'm not researching suicide. ;)

 

Mary - that sounds about right for me. Less so after the finding of the tumor. Sadly, it is like my little stub of hope. Besides this board, that is.

Edited by kvb927
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I'm not suicidal, but I don't care if I die.

 

Apathy, much? ;)

 

I showed Dr. F the article about apathy, my husband insisted that I take it with me :lol:, and Dr. F didn't say much.

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I hope nobody hates on me for saying this, but according to the Mayans, we won't have to think about all that after 2012 anyway. In other words, Lisa, I'm right there with ya.

 

That being said, I am glad you are so apathetic. ;)

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It is sobering to read info about this. I know after my hysterectomy (ovaries removed), my body wasn't using the extra estrogen they were giving me (pills, patches, creams...all bio-identical) and I truly felt suicidal. Now I realize this happened because my adrenals are so weak, but it was frightening.

 

My OBGYN said he's actually been called by a psychiatrist at one of our hospitals 2 or 3 times to come evalute a patient who the psy suspected had a hormone problem. He was right everytime. Smart Psy doc!

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