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54 members have voted

  1. 1. Would you be interested in having a home test for serum cortisol that ran on a Glucometer?

    • Yes, I could finally prove to my Doctor that I know what I'm talking about.
      17
    • Yes, I could track my symptoms against it and manage my life accordingly.
      27
    • No, I shouldn't have to prove anything to my Doctor.
      0
    • No, it wouldn't be worth the money or finger pricks.
      0
    • Yes (other reason)
      10
    • No (Other reason)
      0


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I'd kind of bumped this idea around, wondering if a Cortisol Oxidase could be formulated to work in on the strips used in Glucometers, and finally came across this abstract. I see it's five years old-does anyone have any idea whatever happened with this? A home test probably wouldn't be convincing to a Doctor for a diagnosis, but it could be useful in mapping cycles, charting them to symptoms for research purposes and knowing when to request a suppression test, as well as ruling out patient suspicions.

Claire Cambell,U of M research to use Liifeascan Glucometer to measure serum cortisol.

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I'd kind of bumped this idea around, wondering if a Cortisol Oxidase could be formulated to work in on the strips used in Glucometers, and finally came across this abstract. I see it's five years old-does anyone have any idea whatever happened with this? A home test probably wouldn't be convincing to a Doctor for a diagnosis, but it could be useful in mapping cycles, charting them to symptoms for research purposes and knowing when to request a suppression test, as well as ruling out patient suspicions.

Claire Cambell,U of M research to use Liifeascan Glucometer to measure serum cortisol.

 

At this point, from what I know, that has been shelved, never to be seen again. I know the drug companies aren't super interested in it because there isn't a large subset that would use it. If someone were to perhaps secure some kind of orphan disease research funding, it could perhaps be studied more, but as for becoming feasible in my life time... doubtful. Maybe that will change when I get to grad school if I can talk someone into doing it and letting me tag along as a research assistant, but I think it's going to take some deep pockets and someone with a vested interest to get it off the ground... Just my 2 cents, you can take it or leave it. I'm just a lowly undergrad chem student who talks biochem to one of my professors a lot.

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There's another potentially profitable avenue to pursue, though where the numbers are huge. We know that a significant % of those diagnosed with type 2 diabetes actually have undiagnosed hypercortisolemia, and in hospitals, this is the group with the worst outcomes and diabetic damage.

 

Testing all DMs with cortisol and glucose meters for screening routinely could prevent/avoid a lot of diabetes damage before it occurs, saving money, and selling cortisol meters.

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There's another potentially profitable avenue to pursue, though where the numbers are huge. We know that a significant % of those diagnosed with type 2 diabetes actually have undiagnosed hypercortisolemia, and in hospitals, this is the group with the worst outcomes and diabetic damage.

 

Testing all DMs with cortisol and glucose meters for screening routinely could prevent/avoid a lot of diabetes damage before it occurs, saving money, and selling cortisol meters.

 

 

Professional athelets also test cortisol levels. And Addisonians/CFS sufferers would benefit, too. Their are a lot of folks, and if more knew about it, more would benefit from one.

 

LisaMK looked into one overseas used on pigs but said they couldn't get it sensitive enough for humans. They tried. Here are two other possibilities, though, I've been following. I sent the info to Dr. F a while back: http://www.cnn.com/2...dex.html?hpt=C1

http://www.technolog.../?nlid=2672&a=f

 

The second is at UCLA.

 

I think we need to push someone somewhere about this. Pfizer? They are good about the GH. If enough of us do it, maybe.....

 

Robin

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I have a friend who retired from Pfizer. He has just been named one of Pfizer's Ambassadors -- he travels to medical conferences all over the country. I will write him a note and send him these links. He's followed my Cushing's journey pretty closely so I think he will take a personal interest in this!

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I'd kind of bumped this idea around, wondering if a Cortisol Oxidase could be formulated to work in on the strips used in Glucometers, and finally came across this abstract. I see it's five years old-does anyone have any idea whatever happened with this? A home test probably wouldn't be convincing to a Doctor for a diagnosis, but it could be useful in mapping cycles, charting them to symptoms for research purposes and knowing when to request a suppression test, as well as ruling out patient suspicions.

Claire Cambell,U of M research to use Liifeascan Glucometer to measure serum cortisol.

 

 

I found the email address of the professor under which Ms. Campbell was working and emailed him about our questions/dilemma. I hope he responds.

 

Hugs,

Robin

 

I have a friend who retired from Pfizer. He has just been named one of Pfizer's Ambassadors -- he travels to medical conferences all over the country. I will write him a note and send him these links. He's followed my Cushing's journey pretty closely so I think he will take a personal interest in this!

 

 

Great, Susan!! Awesome.

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I'd kind of bumped this idea around, wondering if a Cortisol Oxidase could be formulated to work in on the strips used in Glucometers, and finally came across this abstract. I see it's five years old-does anyone have any idea whatever happened with this? A home test probably wouldn't be convincing to a Doctor for a diagnosis, but it could be useful in mapping cycles, charting them to symptoms for research purposes and knowing when to request a suppression test, as well as ruling out patient suspicions.

Claire Cambell,U of M research to use Liifeascan Glucometer to measure serum cortisol.

 

Some blood glucose meters have downloadable data collection that some endos check monthly or quarterly as part of their diabetes monitoring. No reason for them not to be convinced or accepting of the same kind of data from a cortisol meter, since they're already used to relying on them in this way, IMO.

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There's a new blood test machine in the experimental stages that can check 40+ different chemicals in the body with one drop of blood. If we could figure out how to get cortisol in on that one!

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Does Pfizer currently manufacture any type of meters? I know Abbott, Bayer, BD, Lifescan (a Johnson and Johnson company), and accu-chek make blood glucose meters. Might want to start with them because at least they have some sort of base technology to work with.

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Some blood glucose meters have downloadable data collection that some endos check monthly or quarterly as part of their diabetes monitoring. No reason for them not to be convinced or accepting of the same kind of data from a cortisol meter, since they're already used to relying on them in this way, IMO.

I guess this is one of those times where I'm actually more cynical about the endos than everyone else. I was thinking they wouldn't trust something that was submitted online because it could be so easily tampered with, and they're so resistant to diagnosing Cushing's that they might accuse someone of faking really high reads. I guess that's unreasonable. I mean, I can hack my iPod touch Nike+ mileage reports if I want it to look like I'm running 10 miles a day (there's no point in that) but the concept is the same. I was thinking it would be most helpful in tracking/proving cycles and knowing when to test, but it might actually be better for your endo to see the live data. It may actually save time and money in testing.

 

The thing is, the way I understand how they work, the meter doesn't read the level of the serum glucose, but rather the level of the reaction of the glucose in the blood to the glucose oxidase on the strips. If the reagents they suggested in this assay are sensitive enough, a simple derived function would be all it took to translate the readings on the meter to serum cortisol levels. It may be that "garage level" technology is all it takes to make this work. It also may just be impossible.

 

Forgive my bluntness, but Zhen, do you have any ideas here? (I think there are several obvious reasons why I ask!)

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I guess this is one of those times where I'm actually more cynical about the endos than everyone else. I was thinking they wouldn't trust something that was submitted online because it could be so easily tampered with, and they're so resistant to diagnosing Cushing's that they might accuse someone of faking really high reads. I guess that's unreasonable. I mean, I can hack my iPod touch Nike+ mileage reports if I want it to look like I'm running 10 miles a day (there's no point in that) but the concept is the same. I was thinking it would be most helpful in tracking/proving cycles and knowing when to test, but it might actually be better for your endo to see the live data. It may actually save time and money in testing.

 

The thing is, the way I understand how they work, the meter doesn't read the level of the serum glucose, but rather the level of the reaction of the glucose in the blood to the glucose oxidase on the strips. If the reagents they suggested in this assay are sensitive enough, a simple derived function would be all it took to translate the readings on the meter to serum cortisol levels. It may be that "garage level" technology is all it takes to make this work. It also may just be impossible.

 

Forgive my bluntness, but Zhen, do you have any ideas here? (I think there are several obvious reasons why I ask!)

 

I have ideas, but no time to post them now. As with diabetes, a meter would only be used so the individual could track his/her cycles and cortisol levels. I think how many times I would have loved to have one to decide if my trip to the lab or doing a UFC is worth doing at the time. I think for episodic/cyclic Cushing's patients (which tends to be most of us), it would be a treasure and make it so much easier to figure out when to test. Also, I think it would help us determine if we might have a recurrence, taking away the guessing game and sending us back to our endos.

 

It's hard to refute a diabetic who shows his/her meter showing high blood sugars. I think that a meter would have to be approved by the FDA to be reputable enough to be accepted, but once that hurdle was passed, it would be used and accepted. Some will resist, obviously. I'm sure much testing to validate the levels the meter shows to lab-tested results would have to happen. Shoot , it woul be awesome if it only did increments of 5ug/dL.... a "less than" or "greater than" kind of thing.

 

Later....must run...students coming in.

 

Robin

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I guess this is one of those times where I'm actually more cynical about the endos than everyone else. I was thinking they wouldn't trust something that was submitted online because it could be so easily tampered with, and they're so resistant to diagnosing Cushing's that they might accuse someone of faking really high reads.

 

Doctors take the data directly from the meters, using a cable connection during office visits. Or at least it's an option. But I cannot imagine why they wouldn't accept the same info about cortisol meters that they accept from diabetics.

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My Endo has been very receptive to my conversation about the rhythyms of cortisol and bg/other symptoms, especially as this has been an on-going issue for me post-op with intense exercise.

 

My dd and SIL are scientists/bio-engineer that have worked with nanotechnology, pharmas, and microarrayers. They are pretty busy, but I'm going to try and get their ear.

 

Sheila

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Look...it's been done for free cortisol in saliva: http://www.icee-con.org/papers/2008/pdf/O-216.pdf

 

hugs...

There was actually an episode of Mythbusters when they were in Alaska where they use some sort of test to measure the amount of cortisol in their saliva, they had the name of the device covered so I don't know who made it.

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I don't know if you can view the attached file or not, but that's the full text journal article about what Tofu just posted. Excellent find, Tofu!

 

The range is 1pM to 10 nM. 2.78 nM = 1ng/ml. I'll do the conversion to units we know (ug/dL) after while. Can't right now...

 

Robin

C0AN00242A.pdf

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I was interested in reading about this, but can't get the pdf to download.

 

 

Ditto. I clicked on it and got this message:

[#10171] You do not have permission to view this attachment.

 

Thanks for finding the entire article. Hopefully we can get this figured out so we can read it...

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Hi, folks...

 

Try here: https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&chrome=true&srcid=0B3VeLPLQdbGhZGJhODU4YmQtZjgxZS00ZDYwLThjOGItYTY5NmY1YTVlYTdl&hl=en

 

If you want to download it, go to the left and click "file" and use the download option.

 

Hugs,

Robin

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Hi, folks...

 

Try here: https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&chrome=true&srcid=0B3VeLPLQdbGhZGJhODU4YmQtZjgxZS00ZDYwLThjOGItYTY5NmY1YTVlYTdl&hl=en

 

If you want to download it, go to the left and click "file" and use the download option.

 

Hugs,

Robin

 

 

Thank you! So it looks like this is a saliva test. "Saliva" is one of the few words I could understand in that article. ;)

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