Jump to content

Our Picks

Top content from across the community, hand-picked by us.

The treatment of adrenal insufficiency with hydrocortisone granules in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) was associated with an absence of adrenal crises and normal growth patterns over a 2-year period, according to study findings published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

The study included a total of 17 children with CAH and 1 child with hypopituitarism. All included participants were <6 years old who were receiving current adrenocortical replacement therapy, including hydrocortisone with or without fludrocortisone. Hydrocortisone medications used in this population were converted from pharmacy compounded capsules to hydrocortisone granules without changing the dose.

These study participants were followed by study investigators for 2 years. Glucocorticoid replacement therapy was given three times a day for a median treatment duration of 795 days. Treatment was adjusted by 3 monthly 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) profiles in children with CAH.

There were a 150 follow-up visits throughout the study. At each visit, participants underwent assessments that measured hydrocortisone dose, height, weight, pubertal status, adverse events, and incidence of adrenal crisis.

 



A total of 40 follow-up visits had changes in hydrocortisone doses based on salivary measurements (n=32) and serum 17-OHP levels (n=8).

At time of study entry, the median daily doses of hydrocortisone were 11.9 mg/m2 for children between the ages of 2 to 8 years, 9.9 mg/m2 for children between 1 month and 2 years, and 12.0 mg/m2 for children <28 days of age. At the end of the study, the respective doses for the 3 age groups were 10.2, 9.8, and 8.6.
...

The researchers concluded that “hydrocortisone granules are an effective treatment for childhood adrenal insufficiency providing the ability to accurately prescribe pediatric appropriate doses.”
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Dr. Friedman wants to update his patients about natural desiccated thyroid (NDT) recalls based on new information from the FDA. Dr. Friedman prescribes various thyroid hormone preparations to his patients with hypothyroidism. This includes natural desiccated thyroid (NDT) of which two preparations are WP Thyroid and Nature-Throid, both made by RLC Labs. On August 25, 2020, RLC Labs announced a voluntary, consumer-level recall of all lots of Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid tablets because some lots contain less than the required 90% of the active ingredient as determined by the FDA. The RLC spokesperson said to Dr. Friedman that one lot of WP Thyroid and 5 lots of Nature-Throid contained between 87% and 90% of the labeled amount of levothyroxine (T4) or liothyronine (T3). Recently the FDA announced which lots are recalled that are listed below. According to the recall, if a patient receives a sub-potent tablet, hypothyroid symptoms may not be controlled. To date, there have been no reports of adverse events related to this recall. Patients who have had an adverse event should contact RLC Labs. The lot numbers are listed on the bottles of Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid.
 
With this information about which lots are recalled, Dr. Friedman is only recommended those taking the effective lots to discontinue them. Currently no lots of Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid tablets are commercially available, so a replacement with the same product is not an option. It is unknown how long it will be before Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid become commercially available.
 
 
 
  • 0 replies

Presented by

Dr. Magge, Assistant Professor of Neurology at Weill Cornell Medical College and an Assistant Attending Neurologist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Ranakrishna, Chief of Neurological Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital, Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery at Avina and Willis Murphy at Weill Cornell Medicine

Click here to attend.

Date: Tuesday, October 13, 2020

Time: 10:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time

Learning objectives:

-          the basic characteristics of the different types of pituitary adenomas

-          the potential predictors of recurrence and aggressiveness in pituitary adenomas

-          the surgical and radiotherapy options for recurrent pituitary adenomas

-          the potential medical interventions, including chemotherapy, for recurrent pituitary adenomas
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Health Condition: All Conditions

Demographics: Ages 18+, United States Resident

Special Request(s): Everyone who has taken part in a clinical trial is asked to share. We are interested in learning why you decided to take part in a clinical trial and how your experience went.

Honoraria: Some respondents may be asked to participate in a clinical trial awareness network where there are paid opportunities to tell their stories.

 Apply to learn more. 
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Michael P Catalino 1 2, David M Meredith 3 4, Umberto De Girolami 3 4, Sherwin Tavakol 1 5, Le Min 6, Edward R Laws 1 4

PMID: 32886921
DOI: 10.3171/2020.5.JNS201514

Abstract

Objective: This study was done to compare corticotroph hyperplasia and histopathologically proven adenomas in patients with Cushing disease by analyzing diagnostic features, surgical management, and clinical outcomes.

Methods: Patients with suspected pituitary Cushing disease were included in a retrospective cohort study and were excluded if results of pathological analysis of the surgical specimen were nondiagnostic or normal. Cases were reviewed by two experienced neuropathologists. Total lesion removal was used as a dichotomized surgical variable; it was defined as an extracapsular resection (including a rim of normal gland) in patients with an adenoma, and for hyperplasia patients it was defined as removal of the presumed lesion plus a rim of surrounding normal gland. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Recurrence-free survival was compared between the two groups.

Results: The final cohort consisted of 63 patients (15 with hyperplasia and 48 with adenoma)...


Keywords: ACTH = adrenocorticotropic hormone; CRH = corticotropin-releasing hormone; Cushing disease; HPA = hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal; HR = hazard ratio; IPSS = inferior petrosal sinus sampling; ROC = receiver operating characteristic; UFC = urinary free cortisol; corticotroph adenoma; corticotroph hyperplasia; diagnosis; pathology; pituitary surgery; surgical outcomes.

From https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32886921/
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Presented by

Ahmad Sedaghat, MD, PhD - Associate Professor and Director of the Division of Rhinology, Allergy and Anterior Skull Base Surgery in the Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and UC Health.

 


Norberto Andaluz, MD, MBA, FACS - Professor of Neurosurgery and Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery - Director, Division of Skull Base Surgery University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and University of Cincinnati Gardner Neuroscience Institute - UC Health


 

Click here to attend

Date: Wednesday, Sept 23, 2020

Time: 3:00 PM  Eastern Daylight Time

Learning objectives:

1.  To understand the surgical steps of endoscopic pituitary surgery
2.  To understand how the surgical steps of endoscopic pituitary surgery translate to post-operative outcomes
3.  To understand surgical factors that can modify post-operative outcomes after endoscopic pituitary surgery
4.  To understand post-operative care that can modify post-operative outcomes after endoscopic pituitary surgery
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome who stopped using Recorlev (levoketoconazole) and moved to a placebo in a study started having their urine cortisol levels rise in response to lack of treatment, compared with those who remained on Recorlev, according to top-line data from the Phase 3 LOGICS trial.

Based on these findings and data from a previous Phase 3 trial of Recorlev called SONICS (NCT01838551), the therapy’s developer, Strongbridge Biopharma, is planning to submit a new drug application requesting its approval to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) early next year.

If approved, Recorlev could be available to patients in the U.S. in 2022.

“We are delighted to announce the positive and statistically significant top-line results of the LOGICS study, which add to the growing body of evidence supporting the potential of Recorlev (levoketoconazole) as an effective and well tolerated cortisol synthesis inhibitor to treat Cushing’s syndrome,” Fredric Cohen, MD, chief medical officer of Strongbridge Biopharma, said in a press release.

Recorlev, also known as COR-003, is an investigational oral treatment for endogenous Cushing’s syndrome that inhibits the production of cortisol, the glucocorticoid hormone that is overly produced in patients with the disorder.

The safety, tolerability, effectiveness, and pharmacological properties of Recorlev in people with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome are currently being assessed in the LOGICS trial (NCT03277690).

LOGICS enrolled patients who had never been treated with Recorlev, as well as those given the medication in SONICS.

...
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Adults with adrenal insufficiency who are adequately treated and trained display the same incidence of COVID-19-suggestive symptoms and disease severity as controls, according to a presenter.

“Adrenal insufficiency is supposed to be associated with an increased risk for infections and complications,” Giulia Carosi, a doctoral student in the department of experimental medicine at Sapienza University of Rome, said during a presentation at the virtual European Congress of Endocrinology Annual Meeting. “Our aim was to evaluate the incidence of COVID symptoms and related complications in this group.”

In a retrospective, case-control study, Carosi and colleagues evaluated the incidence of COVID-19 symptoms and complications among 279 adults with primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency (mean age, 57 years; 49.8% women) and 112 adults with benign pituitary nonfunctioning lesions without hormonal alterations, who served as controls (mean age, 58 years; 52.7% women). All participants lived in the Lombardy region of northern Italy. Participants completed a standardized questionnaire by phone on COVID-19-suggestive symptoms, such as fever, cough, myalgia, fatigue, dyspnea, gastrointestinal symptoms, conjunctivitis, loss of smell, loss of taste, upper respiratory tract symptoms, thoracic pain, headaches and ear pain. Patients with primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency were previously trained to modify their glucocorticoid replacement therapy when appropriate.

From February through April, the prevalence of participants reporting at least one symptom of viral infection was similar between the adrenal insufficiency group and controls (24% vs. 22.3%; P = .788).

Researchers observed “highly suggestive” symptoms among 12.5% of participants in both groups.

No participant required hospitalization and no adrenal crisis was reported. Replacement therapy was correctly increased for about 30% of symptomatic participants with adrenal insufficiency.
...
    • Like
  • 0 replies

The first ever prospective study to test the safety and efficacy of metyrapone in patients with Cushing’s Syndrome in a real-life setting has shown successful results.

HRA Pharma Rare Diseases SAS, of Paris, has presented data from PROMPT, the first ever prospective study designed to confirm metyrapone efficacy and good tolerance in patients with endogenous Cushing’s Syndrome, with results confirming that metyrapone controlled 80% of the patients at week 12 with either normalisation or at least 50% decrease of urinary free cortisol. These initial results are being published to coincide with HRA Pharma Rare Diseases’ participation in the e-ECE conference 2020.

Cushing’s Syndrome is a rare condition where patients have too much cortisol in their blood. Endogenous Cushing’s Syndrome is most often caused by hormone-releasing tumours of the adrenal or the pituitary glands. To manage this condition, controlling high cortisol levels in patients is important.

Successful results with metyrapone

Metyrapone is an inhibitor of the 11-beta-hydroxylase enzyme, which majorly contributes to cortisol synthesis and is approved in Europe for the treatment of endogenous Cushing’s Syndrome based on observational retrospective studies published over more than 50 years. As this prospective study took place over five years from April 2015 to April 2020, the longitudinal format reduced potential sources of bias and helped determine the risk factors of metyrapone when compared to the previous retrospective studies.

The first results of this study showed that at the end of the 12 weeks, metyrapone therapy is a rapid-onset, effective and safe medical treatment in patients living with the syndrome.

Evelina Paberze, COO of HRA Pharma Rare Diseases, said: “At HRA Pharma Rare Diseases, we are dedicated to building comprehensive evidence of our products. The first results of this prospective study clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of metyrapone in treating Cushing’s Syndrome.”...
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Abnormally high levels of cortisol in the urine — one of the hallmarks of Cushing’s syndrome — seem to be associated with alterations in blood sugar metabolism in obese patients, a study found.

The study, “Hypercortisolism and altered glucose homeostasis in obese patients in the pre-bariatric surgery assessment,” was published in the journal Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews.
    • Like
  • 1 reply

Context



Late-night salivary cortisol (LNSC) measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA-F) is a first-line screening test for Cushing’s syndrome (CS) with a reported sensitivity and specificity of >90%. However, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, validated to measure salivary cortisol (LCMS-F) and cortisone (LCMS-E), has been proposed to be superior diagnostically.

Objective, Setting, and Main Outcome Measures



Prospectively evaluate the diagnostic performance of EIA-F, LCMS-F, and LCMS-E in 1453 consecutive late-night saliva samples from 705 patients with suspected CS.

Design



Patients grouped by the presence or absence of at least one elevated salivary steroid result and then subdivided by diagnosis.

Results



We identified 283 patients with at least one elevated salivary result; 45 had an established diagnosis of neoplastic hypercortisolism (CS) for which EIA-F had a very high sensitivity (97.5%). LCMS-F and LCMS-E had lower sensitivity but higher specificity than EIA-F. EIA-F had poor sensitivity (31.3%) for ACTH-independent CS (5 patients with at least one and 11 without any elevated salivary result). In patients with Cushing’s disease (CD), most non-elevated LCMS-F results were in patients with persistent/recurrent CD; their EIA-F levels were lower than in patients with newly diagnosed CD.

Conclusions



Since the majority of patients with ≥1 elevated late-night salivary cortisol or cortisone result did not have CS, a single elevated level has poor specificity and positive predictive value. LNSC measured by EIA is a sensitive test for ACTH-dependent Cushing’s syndrome but not for ACTH-independent CS. We suggest that neither LCMS-F nor LCMS-E improves the sensitivity of late-night EIA-F for CS.

Cushing’s disease, ectopic ACTH, adrenal Cushing’s syndrome, diagnosis, assay performance




Issue Section:



Clinical Research Article

From https://academic.oup.com/jes/advance-article/doi/10.1210/jendso/bvaa107/5876040
    • Like
  • 1 reply

Dr. Friedman prescribes various thyroid hormone preparations to his patients with hypothyroidism. This includes natural desiccated thyroid (NDT) of which two preparations are WP Thyroid and Nature-Throid, both made by RLC Labs. On August 25, 2020, RLC Labs announced a voluntary, consumer-level recall of all lots of Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid tablets because some lots contain less than the required 90% of the active ingredient as determined by the FDA. The RLC spokesperson said to Dr. Friedman that one lot of WP Thyroid and 5 lots of Nature-Throid contained between 87% and 90% of the labeled amount of levothyroxine (T4) or liothyronine (T3). The recall did not disclose which of the lots were affected and all lots are recalled, not just the affected lots. According to the recall, if a patient receives a sub-potent tablet, hypothyroid symptoms may not be controlled. To date, there have been no reports of adverse events related to this recall. Patients who have had an adverse event should contact RLC Labs.

RLC Labs advised that patients should talk to their healthcare professional before they stop taking their Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid medicine. Consumers with questions about the recall can email RLC at recall@rlclabs.com or RLC Customer Service  (877) 797-7997. Patients may return unexpired Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid tablets to their pharmacy who are legally required to refund the cost of the tablets. Currently no lots of Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid tablets are commercially available, so a replacement with the same product is not an option. It is unknown how long it will be before Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid become commercially available.

Dr. Friedman has several comments about this recall. This is the second recall of desiccated thyroid as some lots of NP thyroid were recalled in May 2020. Dr. Friedman sees this as unfortunate, but still believes desiccated thyroid is a good option for patients with hypothyroidism...
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Thanks for being a member of Rare Patient Voice, LLC. We have an opportunity for you to take part in a Cushing Syndrome interview (NEON_4470) for Patients. Our project number for this study is NEON_4470.

Project Details:

Telephone interview


Interview is 60-minutes long


One Hundred Dollar Reward


Looking for Patients diagnosed with Endogenous Cushing Syndrome 


Things to Note:

Patient study only, Caregivers please pass the link along


Unique links, please do not pass along for 2nd use


Want to share this opportunity? Let us know and we can provide a new link


Please use a laptop/computer ONLY. No smartphones or tablets - Preliminary questions are Mobile Friendly!


Save this email to reference if you have any questions about the study!


If you have any problems, email michael.taylor@rarepatientvoice.com and reference the project number.  If you hit reply, you will get an auto do-not-reply email.


If you are interested in this study, please click the link below to answer a few questions to see if you qualify.

Study Link: Link

OR if the Study Hyperlink is not clickable above, please copy/paste this URL below.
https://panel.rarepatientvoice.com/newdesign/site/rarepatientvoice/surveystart.php?surveyID=9mth6d868qpc&panelMemberID=trfnbc7mvduh1gseff1h&invite=email


Thanks as always for your participation! Please be aware that by entering this information you are not guaranteed that you will be selected to participate. As always, we do not share any of your contact information without your permission.

Not Interested in this study? (Click link below so we do not send you any reminders for this study)

Study Reminder Opt Out Link: Link

We truly appreciate the time you set aside to interact with our company and don’t take it for granted. Receive a $5 gift card for referring others who may want to participate in this or future studies. Invite them to join Rare Patient Voice: https://www.rarepatientvoice.com/sign-up. They, too, receive a gift card.

    • Like
  • 0 replies

Osilodrostat treatment was found to be associated with a rapid and sustained reduction in mean concentration of urinary free cortisol (UFC) and improved clinical symptoms in patients with Cushing’s disease, according to the results of a prospective, multicenter, open-label, phase 3 study published in the Lancet Diabetes Endocrinology.

Osilodrostat is an oral inhibitor of 11-β hydroxylase cytochrome P450. Adults aged 18 to 75 years of age with diagnosed persistent or recurrent Cushing’s disease were recruited between 2014 and 2017 at 66 hospitals in 19 countries. Cushing’s disease was defined by a mean UFC concentration over a 24-hour period >1.5 times greater than the upper limit of normal (ULN) and morning plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone level above normal limits.

Participants (n=137) received 30 mg osilodrostat twice daily, dose which was adjusted every 2 weeks until week 12 on the basis of mean 24-hour UFC concentration. The determined maintenance dose was continued until week 24. At week 26, participants who had achieved 24-hour UFC concentration ≤ ULN and did not need titration after week 12 were randomly assigned in an equal ratio to maintain osilodrostat treatment or were switched to a placebo for 8 weeks. This 8-week period of the study was double-blinded. During weeks 35 to 48, all patients were returned to osilodrostat treatment.

In this cohort, mean age was 40.0 years (range, 19.0-70.0 years), 77% of participants were women, the average time since diagnosis was 47.2 months (interquartile range [IQR], 19.0-88.3), 88% had previous pituitary surgery, 16% had pituitary radiation therapy, and 74% had medicinal therapy. At baseline, the mean 24-hour UFC concentration was 1006±1590 nmol/24 h.

...
    • Like
  • 0 replies

...
Starting sometime around 2017, my “normal” levels of fatigue and concentration/memory issues started becoming increasingly worse. Around the time that these symptoms started becoming more noticeable, I was over committing myself in all aspects of my life and my job was very stressful (although in hindsight, I may have just not been able to do as much as I was used to doing). After several months of trying to convince myself that my symptoms were stress related, I finally went to my PCP to get blood work done since I have an extensive family history of thyroid disorders. My thyroid results were fine, but I was diagnosed with hypertension, vitamin D deficiency, and obesity. I kept going back to my doctor to try to figure out what was causing these symptoms. Long story short, I eventually got so frustrated with being told it was my fault and there wasn’t an underlying medical cause that I gave up trying for several years.

Fast forward to the end of last year, my symptoms got to be so bad that I could no longer function in my day-to-day life. In addition to the increasingly debilitating fatigue and brain fog, I started having irregular periods even though my menstrual cycle has always been EXTREMELY regular. So in January, I started the process again to figure out what was happening. After several months and numerous appointments with my PCP and endocrinologist, I had no more answers than I did before and was getting increasingly depressed and frustrated with my situation. I recently went to a different endocrinologist, who ordered a late night (midnight) saliva cortisol test. I dropped it off at the lab on Monday and am anxiously waiting for the results...
    • Welcome!
  • 1 reply

Hypercortisolism Quickly Reversed With Oral Tx

Oral osilodrostat (Isturisa) normalized cortisol levels in Cushing's disease patients who were ineligible for or not cured with pituitary surgery, according to the phase III LINC 3 trial.

After 24 weeks of open-label treatment with twice-daily osilodrostat, 53% of patients (72 of 137; 95% CI 43.9-61.1) were able to maintain a complete response -- marked by mean 24-hour urinary free cortisol concentration of the upper limit of normal or below -- without any uptitration in dosage after the initial 12-week buildup phase, reported Rosario Pivonello, MD, of the Università Federico II di Napoli in Italy, and colleagues.
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Dr. Theodore Friedman (The Wiz) will host a webinar on Growth Hormone Deficiency, PCOS or Cushing’s: How do You Tell Them Apart?

Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including:

Signs and Symptoms of Cushing’s Syndrome


Testing for Cushing’s


Signs and Symptoms of Growth Hormone Deficiency


Testing for Growth Hormone Deficiency


Signs and Symptoms of PCOS


Testing for PCOS


How do you tell them apart?


Sunday • August 2 • 6 PM PDT
Click here on start your meeting or
https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=m4eda0c468071bd2daf33e6189aca3489
OR
Join by phone: (855) 797-9485
<br clear="ALL">
      Meeting Number (Access Code): 133 727 0164 Your phone/computer will be muted on entry.
Slides will be available on the day of the talk here
There will be plenty of time for questions using the chat button. Meeting Password: pcos
For more information, email us at mail@goodhormonehealth.com
    • Like
  • 0 replies

This event has been postponed to Dec. 5, 2020

You are Cordially Invited!

The PNA is pleased to announce our participation in this event!

Saturday, December 5, 2020
8:30am – 4:30pm
Zuckerman Research Center
417 E. 68th St. New York, NY
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Target Audience

This course is intended for endocrinologists, neurosurgeons, otolaryngologists, radiation oncologists, neurologists, ophthalmologists, neuro-oncologists, family medicine and internal medicine physicians, physicians in training and other allied health professionals who treat and manage patients with pituitary diseases. We also invite patients with pituitary disease and their caregivers to attend this educational activity and participate in our interactive afternoon breakout sessions. 

Overall this course aims to improve patient care and outcomes through evidence-based discussion of clinical practice guidelines and emerging therapies. Our goal is to assess and update current practices to promote earlier diagnosis and treatment of pituitary diseases. The multidisciplinary nature of the course will allow for the dissemination of knowledge across the variety of practitioners caring for pituitary patients, and for the patients themselves.

Pituitary patients will be able to review treatment options, learn about ongoing clinical trials, and discuss their comprehensive care with providers and other patients. The educational objective of this patient session is to provide a forum for pituitary patients to discuss treatment options and new therapies with providers and other patients.

Patients with pituitary disease and their caregivers are invited to attend this educational activity FREE of charge. If you are a patient or caregiver interested in attending, please email cme@mskcc.org to register (registration is required in order to attend).

Medical Professionals who wish to attend must register online: 
mskcc.org/PituitaryCourse

View Course Flyer
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Abstract

Despite various approaches to immunoassay and chromatography for monitoring cortisol concentrations, conventional methods require bulky external equipment, which limits their use as mobile health care systems. Here, we describe a human pilot trial of a soft, smart contact lens for real-time detection of the cortisol concentration in tears using a smartphone. A cortisol sensor formed using a graphene field-effect transistor can measure cortisol concentration with a detection limit of 10 pg/ml, which is low enough to detect the cortisol concentration in human tears. In addition, this soft contact lens only requires the integration of this cortisol sensor with transparent antennas and wireless communication circuits to make a smartphone the only device needed to operate the lens remotely without obstructing the wearer’s view. Furthermore, in vivo tests using live rabbits and the human pilot experiment confirmed the good biocompatibility and reliability of this lens as a noninvasive, mobile health care solution...
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the viral strain that has caused the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, has presented healthcare systems around the world with an unprecedented challenge. In locations with significant rates of viral transmission, social distancing measures and enforced ‘lockdowns’ are the new ‘norm’ as governments try to prevent healthcare services from being overwhelmed. However, with these measures have come important challenges for the delivery of existing services for other diseases and conditions. The clinical care of patients with pituitary disorders typically involves a multidisciplinary team, working in concert to deliver timely, often complex, disease investigation and management, including pituitary surgery. COVID-19 has brought about major disruption to such services, limiting access to care and opportunities for testing (both laboratory and radiological), and dramatically reducing the ability to safely undertake transsphenoidal surgery. In the absence of clinical trials to guide management of patients with pituitary disease during the COVID-19 pandemic, herein the Professional Education...
    • Like
  • 0 replies

I think we always knew Cushing's and pregnancy were related...

Abstract

Cushing’s syndrome (CS) during pregnancy is very rare with a few cases reported in the literature.

Of great interest, some cases of CS during pregnancy spontaneously resolve after delivery. Most studies suggest that aberrant luteinizing hormone (LH)/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) receptor (LHCGR) seems to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of CS during pregnancy.

However, not all women during pregnancy are observed cortisol hypersecretion. Moreover, some cases of adrenal tumors or macronodular hyperplasia with LHCGR expressed, have no response to hCG or LH. Therefore, alternative pathogenic mechanisms are indicated. It has been recently reported that estrogen binding to estrogen receptor α (ERα) could enhance the adrenocortical adenocarcinoma (ACC) cell proliferation.

Herein, we hypothesize that ERα is probably involved in CS development during pregnancy.

Better understanding of the possible mechanism of ERα on cortisol production and adrenocortical tumorigenesis will contribute to the diagnosis and treatment of CS during pregnancy.

Read the entire article here: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306987720303893?via%3Dihub
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Presented by

Georgios A. Zenonos, MD

Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery
Associate Director, Center for Skull Base Surgery
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh PA, 15217
Presbyterian Hospital, Suite B400

No Registration is Required.  It will be webcast by Microsoft Teams.

Click here to attend.

 




Date: Friday, July 17, 2020

Time: 10:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time, 1:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
    • Like
  • 0 replies

What should you do if an Addison crisis threatens? How do you prepare an emergency injection and how do you administer it?

If you have a gastro-intestinal infection, accompanied by diarrhoea and vomiting, there is a big risk of an Addison crisis. Always discuss with your specialist what you have done and what else needs to be done. Explain to your family, colleagues and friends what illness you have, and what they should do if necessary.

Show them the animated clip.

 

 
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Can someone please offer help, ive been suffering for a year and just got blood results today with a high cortisol reading. My doctor said that my contraceptive pill could have caused this, however, I am not on the regular pill but on the POP progesteron only pill.

Is anyone aware of if this raises cortisol levels the same way the regular combined pill does?

Any help would be so very much appreciated!

 

Please respond here, on the message boards, or in the original post.

 

Thanks!
    • Like
  • 0 replies

Mr. Goacher's Son returns after 13 years to tell more of this story. Family's Despair over Rare Disease
Exclusive By Benjamin Parkes
THE family of a Chippenham man who died of a rare hormonal disorder have told of the despair his illness caused before it was diagnosed.
 
An inquest held in Flax Bourton on Tuesday ruled that John Goacher, 51, of Stonelea Close, died of natural causes on May 18 last year, after having surgery at Frenchay Hospital in Bristol.
 
The operation was intended to ease the symptoms of Cushing's Disease, which included obesity, a rounded face, increased fat around the neck and thinning arms and legs.
    • Like
  • 13 replies

Announcements

×
×
  • Create New...